American History

Samuel Campbell Hoagland 1855–1940, Early Elgin, Illinois, Livery and Transportation

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“Sam was a prudent businessman who maintained a card index of every animal and piece of equipment. He retired in 1913. He owned 26 horses, 11 full-sized closed carriages, 3 hearses, 3 fancy conveyances, opera hacks, pallbearer wagons, two seat carriages and one-seat light driving rig.”

Wagons to taxicabs: 4 generations of Hoaglands haul Elginites by E. C. Mike Alft


Samuel Campbell Hoagland was my great great grandfather.

Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND (1880 – 1961)
son of Samuel Campbell HOAGLAND
 
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
 
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
 
Me
the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II
 

 

Samuel Campbell Hoagland was born on December 22, 1855, in Elgin, Illinois. His parents were Zephaniah and Celia (Sears) Hoagland.

Sam married Maria Elizabeth Blow on June 25, 1879 in his hometown. According to family history notes by my grandmother, the couple was married at the residence of D.R. Jencks, Rev. D.B. Cheney officiating. However, Robert B. Mogler, another Sam Hoagland descendant, has stated their marriage certificate shows they were married a the First Baptist Church in Elgin. They had two children during their marriage, a son Frederick Judson “Fred,” was born on June 12, 1880, and a daughter, Jennie May “Jane,”born on November 14, 1881. Both children were born in Elgin.

 


 

Hoaglands

For more than a century, through four generations and changing modes of transportation, the Hoaglands hauled freight and people around Elgin.

Zephania Hoagland’s aunt and uncle pioneered east of town in Hanover Township in 1837. Born in Steuben County, New York, Zeph also was an early arrival here, but didn’t settle down in Elgin until he had tried his luck as a’49er seeking gold in California. Zepbania became a teamster whose horse-drawn wagon carried goods around the little mill town that grew into an industrial city during his lifetime.

Zeph’s son, Sam C. Hoagland, was born in Elgin in 1855. He worked for his father and then purchased his own one-horse express wagon in 1876. The livery (a stable keeping horses and vehicles for hire) he bought four years later became one of Elgin=s largest. He also ran buses to and from the factories and supplied a big Tally-Ho wagon for picnics.

Sam Hoagland was a prudent businessman who maintained a card index on the cost of every animal and piece of equipment in his stable. His records indicated what each horse had eaten and earned. He also knew each one’s habits. When a drummer had rented a rig to go to Dundee, be complained on returning that the horse had balked. Sam charged him more than originally agreed because the rig had gone all the way to Algonquin. How did Sam know? Old Betsy never stalled except on the Algonquin bill.

Some customers desired well-dressed drivers as well as a carnage. In the Hoagland wardrooms were 15 outfits of fur coats, gloves, and caps. There were enough neatly brushed silk hats to costume a half-dozen minstrel shows.

By the time be retired in 1913, Sam Hoagland owned 26 horses, 11 full-sized closed carriages, three hearses, three fancy conveyances, opera hacks, pallbearer wagons, two-seat carriages, picnic wagons, and one-seat light driving rigs of all descriptions.

Sam’s son, Fred J. Hoagland, was born in Elgin in 1880 and joined the business after leaving high school. When the livery closed, he adapted to the motor age and started the Hoagland Taxicab Company with three Model-T Fords and two Reos, all black. Meters were introduced in 1919, and the original fare they tallied was 25 cents for the first mile and 10 cents for each succeeding two-fifths mile. After World War I, Fred began buying Yellow cabs manufactured in Chicago by John Hertz, and the firm’s name was changed to the Elgin Yellow Cab Company.

The early Yellows had tonneaus in which only the passenger compartment was enclosed. The driver was in the open air, exposed to rain and snow. After Hertz sold out to General Motors, Hoagland switched to Chevrolets.

Two-way radios, which reduced cost and response time, were introduced in 1946. At its operating peak in the 1950s, Elgin Yellow had about 60 full and part-time employees, including three full time dispatchers, two telephone operators, maintenance shop repairmen, and drivers. The firm had 18 cars on the streets in the summer and 25 in the winter. The cars averaged about 7,000 mile per month. Eight new cars were purchased each year. By the end of the decade, Elgin Yellow had switched from Chevrolets to Checkers made in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Fred’s son, Charles Hoagland, was born in Elgin in 1913. While still a boy, he learned the ropes by guiding new drivers around the city. He eventually became a partner in the business, withdrawing in 1964, but was driving his private livery until he reached the age of 70.

—–

ElginHistory.com – Elgin: Days Gone By – E. C. Alft

 


 

At the age of 84 years old, Sam died and was buried, alongide his wife, Maria, in Elgin’s Bluffside Cemetery. The following was transcribed by my grandmother, Helen Marie Hoagland who was his granddaughter, from a newspaper article at the time of his death. She did not state the source of the death notice:

Sam Hoagland Death Notice Transcribed by Helen Hoagland-his granddaughter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Capt. John Rankin Harkness 1830-1903

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Capt. John Rankin Harkness 1830–1903 / Biloxi Pioneer / Architect and builder of many homes, the school and businesses in Biloxi. Harkness was street commissioner on the Biloxi City Council and was a member of the school board as evidenced in The Biloxi Herald newspaper at the time.

 

 


Capt. John Rankin Harkness

 

1830–1903

Birth 26 Mar 1830 Pelham, Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA

Death 11 Jun 1903 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA

my great-great grandfather

 


Edna Irene HARKNESS (1880 – 1952)
daughter of Capt. John Rankin HARKNESS
 
John Harkness MORRIS (1901 – 1965)
son of Edna Irene HARKNESS
 
Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013)
daughter of John Harkness MORRIS
 
Me
the daughter of Janie Lucille MORRIS

J.R. Harkness is a descendant of two proved Mayflower passengers:
Francis Cooke and John Turner

 

When Capt. John Rankin Harkness was born on March 26, 1830, in Pelham, Massachusetts, his father, William, was 37 and his mother, Abigail, was 36. He married Irene Jordan on November 19, 1868, in Harrison County, Mississippi. They had seven children in 14 years. He died on June 11, 1903, in Biloxi, Mississippi, at the age of 73, and was buried there.

 

Capt. John Rankin Harkness Family Chart
Capt. John Rankin Harkness of Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi. Biloxi Pioneer.

J.R. Harkness resided in Biloxi.

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25 Feb 1888 The Biloxi Daily Herald – J.R. Harkness, Biloxi, MS

 

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23 Jun 1888 The Biloxi Daily Herald / Mississippi / J.R. Harkness

In 1888 the state of Mississippi began providing pensions to former Confederate soldiers and sailors, as well as their widows and wartime servants residing in the state.

1888 JR Harkness designed this building. Howard Memorial School-Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi

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J.R. Harkness – Architect – Biloxi, Mississippi 1888
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John Rankin Harkness – 23 Jun 1888 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA – Newspaper Article from the Biloxi Daily Herald-Contractor & Builder

 

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John Rankin Harkness-President of Mechanics Steam Fire Engine Company No. 2 – 19 Sep 1891 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA Newspaper Article from the Biloxi Daily Herald, Also show W.T. Harkness as 2nd Assistant.
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Confederate Veterans-J.R. Harkness is listed as part of committee of arrangements for a barbecue for ex-Confederates, their families and friends. 8 Oct 1892

Biloxi Herald – November 19, 1892 states J.R. Harkness ran for Alderman.

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1893 John R. Harkness & Sons Planing and Milling Co. of Biloxi, Mississippi Daily Herald Newspaper, Biloxi, MS

 

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Capt. J. R. Harkness Contracted to Repair Damages-The Daily Herald, Biloxi, MS 24 Feb 1894
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The Harkness Boys Have Always Been Sailors 7 Aug 1897 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA Daily Herald Newspaper, Biloxi, MS Note: Their boat was named the May H. (May Harkness?)
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William Harkness Family in History of Pelham History of Pelham, Page 421. Mention of John Harkness in Pelham as William Harkness’ son.

J.R. Harkness was a member of the Freemasons

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Downtown Biloxi 1902-Photo from The Daily Herald Twentieth Century Coast Edition-Historical and Biographical 1902 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA The building on the right side of this photo, on the corner, is one built by J.R. Harkness and his son.
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J. R. Harkness – Biloxi Street Commissioner 1902 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA Twentieth century coast edition of the Biloxi Daily Herald … historical and biographical: “one of the oldest and most respected citizens”

 

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List of Biloxi Pioneers – “HARKNESS” is on the list.
John R. Harkness born-Massachusetts Town and Vital Records 1620-1988
John R. Harkness born-Massachusetts Town and Vital Records 1620-1988 / Biloxi Pioneer
John R. Harkness born-Massachusetts Town and Vital Records 1620-1988  2
John R. Harkness born-Massachusetts Town and Vital Records 1620-1988 Zoom
U.S. City Directories 1822-1995 Biloxi Mississippi Listing for J.R. Harkness' Widow Irene
U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 Biloxi, Mississippi listing for John R Harkness’ widow, Irene.

The Carson edifice at Belle Fontaine, was designed and built by John R. Harkness & Sons of Biloxi.  John .Rankin Harkness (1827-1903), a native of Amherst, Massachusetts, had commenced his contracting business at Biloxi in 1868.  The two-story residence cost $5000 and was shingled from the ground to the cone.  Mr. Harkness and his family and friends occasionally sailed to the construction site, often referred to as “New Chicago”, for a days outing.  J.R. Harkness & Sons completed the Carson home in October 1892.(Dyer, 1895, “Biloxi”, The Biloxi Herald, April 9, 1892, p. 4, July 30, 1892, p. 4, and September 28, 1892, p. 4)

http://www.oceanspringsarchives.com/osfamilies.htm taken from several issues of the Biloxi Daily Herald 1892


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John R. Harkness / Irene Jordan Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA Old Biloxi City Cemetery
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John Rankin Harkness Death Notice 12 Jun 1903 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA Newspaper Notice from the Daily Herald

 

Memorial on Find-A-Grave for John Rankin Harkness:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=29276167&ref=acom

 

Capt. Increase Graham Child 1740–1810

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Capt. Increase Graham Child

1740–1810

 5th Great Grandfather

Olive Pease CHILD (1775 – 1847)
daughter of Increase Graham CHILD
Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D. (1801 – 1843)
son of Olive Pease CHILD
Franklin Smith BOSWORTH (1832 – 1919)
son of Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D.
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1870 – 1919)
son of Franklin Smith BOSWORTH
Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
son of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.
Me
the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

When Increase Graham CHILD was born on December 13, 1740, in Woodstock, Connecticut, his father, Dr. Ephraim, was 29 and his mother, Mary, was 28. He married Olive PEASE on November 3, 1762, in Milton, New York. They had eight children in 17 years. He died on June 10, 1810, in Greenfield, New York, at the age of 69, and was buried in Saratoga County, New York.

Source Citation – Connecticut Soldiers, French and Indian War, 1755-62:

Given Name Increase
Surname Child
Page # 242
Company Carpenter’s
Co.Command Carpenter, John Capt.
Comments Muster Roll of Company of late recruits of Aug.1757.

Connecticut Soldiers, French and Indian War, 1755-62:

Given Name Increase
Surname Child
Page # 63
Location Connecticut
Regiment Third
Regt.Command Fitch, Eleazer Colonel & Captain
Company Sixth
Co.Command Holmes, David Captain
Campaign Year 1758
Source List Muster Roll

Connecticut Soldiers, French and Indian War, 1755-62:

Given Name Increase
Surname Child
Page # 168
Location Connecticut
Regiment Fourth
Regt.Command Fitch, Eleazer Colonel & Captain
Company Seventh
Co.Command Holmes, David Captain
Campaign Year 1759
Source List Muster Roll

Increase Graham Child fought against the British during the Revolutionary War.
Capture
Increase Graham Child – Source Citation for Index of the Rolls of Honor (Ancestor’s Index) in the Lineage Books of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Vol. I

Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots:

Name Increase Capt Child
Cemetery North Milton Cem
Location Milton, Saratoga Co NY 41
Increase Child-Salmon Child Fold3_Page_17_Revolutionary_War_Pension_and_BountyLand_Warrant_Application_Files
Increase Child and Salmon Child Fold3_Page_17_Revolutionary_War_Pension_and_BountyLand_Warrant_Application_Files
Capt. Childs Fold3_Page_1_Compiled_Service_Records_of_Soldiers_Who_Served_in_the_American_Army_During_the_Revolutionary_War (1)
Capt. Childs Fold3_Page_1_Compiled_Service_Records_of_Soldiers_Who_Served_in_the_American_Army_During_the_Revolutionary_War (1)

 

Increase Childs Fold3_Page_1_Compiled_Service_Records_of_Soldiers_Who_Served_in_the_American_Army_During_the_Revolutionary_War
Increase Childs Fold3_Page_1_Compiled_Service_Records_of_Soldiers_Who_Served_in_the_American_Army_During_the_Revolutionary_War
Increase Child Fold3_Page_18_Revolutionary_War_Rolls_17751783
Increase Child Fold3_Page_18_Revolutionary_War_Rolls_17751783

Swamp Buddies Seth Matthews and Ed Morris – Gulfport Business Men of the Past

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One day I was doing research in the newspaper files and found this priceless nugget of gold. A dear friend and I had grown up together and were childhood buddies in Gulfport, Mississippi. We never knew our ancestors had known each other. Cathey’s great grandfather Seth Matthews and my great grandfather, D. Edmund Morris went hunting in the Pascagoula swamps in 1913. The serendipity of genealogy research often brings surprises like this to keep us hooked on hunting ancestors. What a sweet find!

Daily Herald Newspaper – Mississippi Gulf Coast

 


 

An old post card…

The Singing River
The Singing River, Pascagoula River, Gulf Coast

Richard Warren 1579–1628: Mayflower Passenger

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Richard Warren

1579–1628

Birth 1579 London, Middlesex, , England

Death 20 October 1628 Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

my 10th great-grandfather – Bosworth Line

Mayflower Passenger


 

Elizabeth WARREN (1617 – 1670)
daughter of Richard WARREN
 
Benjamin CHURCH (1637 – 1717)
son of Elizabeth WARREN
 
Charles CHURCH (1682 – 1746)
son of Benjamin CHURCH
 
Constant CHURCH (1708 – 1740)
son of Charles CHURCH
 
Mary Reynolds CHURCH (1741 – 1781)
daughter of Constant CHURCH
 
Alfred BOSWORTH (1773 – 1861)
son of Mary Reynolds CHURCH
 
Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D. (1801 – 1843)
son of Alfred BOSWORTH
 
Franklin Smith BOSWORTH (1832 – 1919)
son of Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D.
 
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1870 – 1919)
son of Franklin Smith BOSWORTH
 
Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
son of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH
 
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.
Me
the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

Richard & Elizabeth Warren

Richard Warren was a passenger on the Mayflower, arriving in Plymouth in 1620. We know he was from London and the evidence seems to indicate that he was a man of some wealth.

His wife, Elizabeth, arrived in Plymouth on the Anne in 1623 with the couples’ daughters Abigail, Anna, Elizabeth, Mary and Sarah. Two sons, Nathaniel and Joseph, were born to the Warrens in Plymouth.

Richard Warren died in 1628. His wife Elizabeth outlived him by 45 years, dying at Plymouth in 1673. Her death was noted in the Records of Plymouth Colony (PCR 8:35) : “Mistris Elizabeth Warren, an aged widdow, aged above 90 yeares, deceased on the second of October, 1673, whoe, haveing lived a godly life, came to her grave as a shocke of corn fully ripe.”

During the long period of her widowhood, Elizabeth Warren’s name appears in the records of Plymouth Colony. She appears first as executor of her husband’s estate, next paying taxes owed by a head of household, and finally as an independent agent in her own right.

An article by Edward J. Davies in the April 2003 issue of The American Genealogist gives evidence that Elizabeth Warren may have been the daughter of Augustine Walker.   An Elizabeth Walker, daughter of Augustine Walker, married a Richard Warren in Great Amwell, Hertfordshire, on April 14, 1610.  The will of Augustine Walker, dated April 19, 1613, refers not only to his daughter Elizabeth Warren but also her 3 daughters: Mary, Ann and Sarah.  These three Warren daughters correspond to three of the Warren daughters who were passengers on the Anne in 1623.

http://www.pilgrimhall.org/richard_elizabeth_warren.htm

Francis Cooke 1583–1663: Mayflower Passenger

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Francis Cooke

1583–1663

 my 11th great-grandfather

Mayflower Passenger


Jane COOKE (1616 – )
daughter of Francis COOKE
 
John Experience MITCHELL (1632 – 1719)
son of Jane COOKE
 
Elizabeth MITCHELL (1628 – 1684)
daughter of John Experience MITCHELL
 
Jane WASHBURN (1671 – 1698)
daughter of Elizabeth MITCHELL
 
Joanna ORCUTT (1690 – 1758)
daughter of Jane WASHBURN
 
William EDSON (1724 – 1800)
son of Joanna ORCUTT
 
Keziah EDSON (1755 – 1841)
daughter of William EDSON
 
William HARKNESS (1793 – 1831)
son of Keziah EDSON
 
Capt. John Rankin HARKNESS (1830 – 1903)
son of William HARKNESS
 
Edna Irene HARKNESS (1880 – 1952)
daughter of Capt. John Rankin HARKNESS
 
John Harkness MORRIS (1901 – 1965)
son of Edna Irene HARKNESS
 
Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013)
daughter of John Harkness MORRIS
Me
the daughter of Janie Lucille MORRIS

Francis Cooke was born in 1583 in Essex, the child of Richard and Alice. He married Hester Mahieu on June 30, 1603, in Netherlands. They had seven children in 18 years. He died on April 7, 1663, in Plymouth, Massachusetts, having lived a long life of 80 years.

 

Francis Cooke

Francis Cooke was born in England, around 1583.  By profession, he was a woolcomber.  He was in Leiden as early as 1603 (before the Pilgrim Separatist community emigrated to Holland) when he married Hester Mayhieu.  They were members of the Leiden Walloon Church, a congregation of French-speaking Belgian people whose beliefs were very similar to those of the English Separatists.

Francis arrived in Plymouth in 1620 on the Mayflower with his teenage son John.   Hester Mayhieu Cooke and the couple’s two other children, Jane and Jacob, arrived on the Anne in 1623.  Two more daughters, Hester and Mary, were born to Francis and Hester Cooke in Plymouth.

Francis Cooke died in 1663.

http://www.pilgrimhall.org/francis_cooke.htm

Alice (Carpenter) Bradford 1590–1670: Plymouth Colony

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Alice Carpenter (Southworth) Bradford

1590–1670

 my 10th great-grandmother

Constant SOUTHWORTH (1615 – 1679)
son of Alice CARPENTER
 
Alice SOUTHWORTH (1647 – 1719)
daughter of Constant SOUTHWORTH
 
Charles CHURCH (1682 – 1746)
son of Alice SOUTHWORTH
 
Constant CHURCH (1708 – 1740)
son of Charles CHURCH
 
Mary Reynolds CHURCH (1741 – 1781)
daughter of Constant CHURCH
 
Alfred BOSWORTH (1773 – 1861)
son of Mary Reynolds CHURCH
 
Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D. (1801 – 1843)
son of Alfred BOSWORTH
 
Franklin Smith BOSWORTH (1832 – 1919)
son of Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D.
 
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1870 – 1919)
son of Franklin Smith BOSWORTH
 
Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
son of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH
 
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.
 
Me
the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

Alice Carpenter was born on August 3, 1590, in Wrington, Somerset, England, the child of Alexander and Priscilla. She married Edward Southworth and they had two children together. She then married Governor William Bradford on August 14, 1623, in Plymouth, Massachusetts. She died on March 26, 1670, in Plymouth, Massachusetts, having lived a long life of 79 years.

William Bradford and Alice (Carpenter) Southworth: Gov. William Bradford, the son of William Bradford and Alice Hanson, was born in about 1590 and was baptized on Thursday, 19 March 1590 o.s. in St. Helen’s chapel, Austerfield, Yorkshire. He immigrated in 1620 to Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. He died at the age of about 67 on Tuesday, 19 May 1657 o.s. in Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. William Bradford (aged about 33) married Alice (Carpenter) Southworth (aged about 33) on Thursday, 14 August 1623 o.s. in Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. Alice (Carpenter) Southworth, the daughter of Alexander Carpenter, was born in about 1590 and was baptized on Monday, 3 August 1590 o.s. in Wrington [Wrentham], Somerset. She immigrated in July 1623 to Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. She died at the age of about 80 on Saturday, 26 March 1670 o.s. in Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. She was buried on Tuesday, 29 March 1670 o.s. in Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. Their children were: Maj. William Bradford, born on Thursday, 17 June 1624 o.s. in Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony, died on Sunday, 20 February 1704 o.s., buried in Burial Hill cemetery in Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He married Mary (Atwood) Holmes in 1677 in Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. Mercy Bradford, born before 1627. She married Benjamin Vermayes on Thursday, 21 December 1648 o.s. in Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. Joseph Bradford, born in 1630, died on Sunday, 10 July 1715 o.s. in Kingston, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, buried in Burial Hill cemetery in Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He married Jael Hobart on Wednesday, 25 May 1664 o.s. in Hingham, New Plymouth Colony. Research Notes: William Bradford came over on the Mayflower. Torrey lists William Bradford (1590 (1588?) – 1657) m. Dorothy May, 9 Dec 1613, Amsterdam, Holland Alice was a widow. William, her son is listed with the surnames of both her husbands in the IGI. IGI lists William and Alice married as follows: William Bradford m. Alice Southworth 14 Aug 1623 William Bradford m. Alice Carpenter 14 Aug 1623 William Bradford m. Alice Southwaite 15 Aug 1623 William Bradford m. Alice Carpenter 24 Aug 1623 William Bradford m. Alice Richards 17 Jun 1624 Torrey lists: William Bradford m. Alice (Carpenter) Southworth 14 Aug 1623 1590-1657 c 1590-1670 IGI lists William (the son) both as William Bradford son of William Bradford and Alice Carpenter and as William Southworth son of Edward Southworth and Alice Carpenter. Since he was born ~44 weeks after William and Alice married, he would appear to be a legitimate Bradford. According to AHD: John Bradford (son of Gov. Bradford) m. Martha Browne Martha Browne 2nd m. Thomas Tracy (82-12)

Alice Carpenter Southworth Bradford

Alice Carpenter and her sisters (Agnes, Juliana, Mary and Priscilla) were part of the Leiden Separatist community. Alice married Edward Southworth; they had two sons, Constant and Thomas.

After Edward Southworth died, Alice Carpenter Southworth sailed to Plymouth on the Anne in 1623. Shortly after her arrival, she married Plymouth Governor William Bradford.
The marriage of William Bradford and Alice Carpenter Southworth was noted in a letter written by Emmanuel Altham to his brother Sir Edward Altham in September, 1623:
“Upon the occasion of the Governor’s marriage, since I came, Massasoit was sent for to the wedding, where came with him his wife, the queen, although he hath five wives. With him came four other kings and about six score men with their bows and arrows – where, when they came to our town, we saluted them with the shooting off of many muskets and training our men. And so all the bows and arrows was brought into the Governor’s house, and he brought the Governor three or four bucks and a turkey. And so we had very good pastime in seeing them dance, which is in such manner, with such a noise that you would wonder…
“And now to say somewhat of the great cheer we had at the Governor’s marriage. We had about twelve pasty venisons, besides others, pieces of roasted venison and other such good cheer in such quantity that I could wish you some of our share. For here we have the best grapes that ever you say – and the biggest, and divers sorts of plums and nuts which our business will not suffer us to look for.”
Sidney V. James, Jr., editor, Three Visitors to Early Plymouth
(Plymouth, Mass.: Plimoth Plantation, 1963), p. 29-30.
Constant and Thomas Southworth came to Plymouth sometime after 1627, they probably lived with their mother and stepfather. Alice and William Bradford had three children: William, Mercy and Joseph. William Bradford died in 1657, Alice died in 1670. Her death was noted in the Records of Plymouth Colony:
“On the 26th day of March, 1670, Mistris Allice Bradford, Seni’r, changed this life for the better, haueing attained to fourscore years of age, or therabouts. Shee was a godly matron, and much loued while shee liued, and lamented, tho aged, when shee died, and was honorabley enterred on the 29th day of the month aforsaid, att New Plymouth.”

Before her death, Alice Carpenter Southworth Bradford wrote a will.
Click here for that will as well as for the inventory of her estate at the time of her death.

Great source of information –