Elgin Illinois Pioneer

Jane May (Hoagland) Bailey (1881 – 1986): Possunt quia posse videntur

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The Press Democrat

Santa Rosa, California

December 20, 1981

Page 21

***

20th Century woman still one who can

By Celia Ersland

***

Jane Bailey’s motto in high school was “Possunt quia posse videntur.” Loosely translated, it  means, “He who thinks he can.”

Recently, Mrs. Bailey, a resident of Martin’s Retirement Home, 3357 Hoen Ave., rounded out a century of her life. Two parties were given for the centenarian – one for her friends of the retirement home and another at the home of her daughter, Betty Schreiber of Oakmont.

The party at her daughter’s home was attended by Mrs. Bailey’s grandchildren and great grandchildren, and for this occasion, she wrote a history of her life and of her family. She was assisted by Mrs. Schreiber.

“My high school motto has proven true many times in my life for when you live in a mining camp there are many challenges. I once remember sewing up a deep gash in a miner’s hand with an ordinary needle and thread to stop the bleeding. The hard rock miner who was holding the victim’s hand for me fainted!”

Mrs. Bailey who is alert and uses only her walker when she moves about, adds, “Our graduating class was called ‘The Twentieth Century Class’ as we were the first class to graduate in Elgin (Illinois) in this century. One of the highlights of my life was playing Hermes, the lead in our class play, ‘Midsummer Night’s Dream.’” It played two nights at the Elgin Opera House and we were directed by an actor from Chicago.”

“I must not have been as great as I thought I was, for I tried out for an elocution scholarship to the University of Chicago and lost. I did win a scholarship to the University of Illinois in home economics. My father didn’t believe that girls needed a college education, but he finally let me go. So in the fall of 1902, he took me by train to Urbana, Ill. I joined Chi Omega Sorority and had a wonderful time.”

Mrs. Bailey, who has four grandchildren and eight great grandchildren, was born in Elgin on Nov. 14, 1881. Her father Samuel Hoagland had a livery stable with “matched teams and equipment for all occasions – wedding, funeral, holidays … he finally owned the Yellow Cab Taxi Co. there.”

Her mother, Maria Blow Hoagland was “only five feet tall and always full of fun.” Her grandmother, Lucy Flude Knott, came from Leicester, England at the age of 20. She and her husband, Mrs. Bailey’s grandfather, who sailed aboard a sailing vessel to America in 1848, had 10 children and lived in Dundee, Ill. Grandmother Blow advised Mrs. Bailey when she was married “not to have such a large family as she always had one baby on her lap and one under her apron.”

Grandmother Hoagland was born Celia Sears and was related to the Sear, Roebuck & Founders. Grandmother Blow had Roebuck relatives.

One of Mrs. Bailey’s “happiest childhood memories is of riding over the snow to Thanksgiving and Christmas celebrations in Dundee with the sleigh bells ringing.”

Another recollection involved her freshman year at the University of Illinois in 1902. “At my first dance I met a tall handsome Sig Alph who asked me for a dance and put his name on my dance card – and then stood me up.”

“He must have had a good alibi, as we later became engaged and were married June 5, 1906, just before Tom Bailey graduated with a bachelor of science degree in chemistry. I didn’t graduate as after two years in school we had become engaged and my father didn’t see any reason for me to continue my education.

The Bailey’s had been bitten by the mining bug and we took a job as assayer with a mining company in Silverton, Colo.

Mrs. Bailey remembers the trip to the west in 9105. Indians stood around “wrapped in blankets at the train station and she was frightened a bit by the narrow gauge railroad they rode in the Colorado mountains.

“Silverton was a rough mining town in 1905…We took up residence in a rooming house.” Later they found a furnished home and eventually had their first daughter, Mary Elizabeth. But she lived only a few days. Two years later the couple moved to Wallstreet, another Colorado mining town.

Their children, Thomas, Dorothy and Betty, were born there.

“Wallstreet was about nine miles from Boulder,” Mrs. Bailey recalls, “but it took about a half a day to make the trip by horse and buggy – lots of resting the horse, as it was a steep road. Then we moved to Boulder where Tom opened a custom assay office and Bob was born.”

During World War I and II, the Baileys were involved in volunteer work. After World War I, he sold the assay office and took up metallurgy full time. During World War II, Tom Bailey went to work for the Bureau of Mines in Washington, D. C.

Later they moved to Oxford, N. C., for a few years and eventually back to Colorado. Tom Bailey died in 1965, after almost 60 years of marriage. Mrs. Bailey lived in Colorado until three years ago, when she came to Santa Rosa to be near her one remaining child, Betty Schreiber, and Mrs. Schreiber’s husband and children.

She attributes her century of life to her forebearers.

“They say if you want to live to a ripe old age, you should choose your ancestors for longevity. My grandfather Blow lived within 10 days of his 99th birthday, and four of his children lived into their late 90s – my mother lived the longest: 99 and four months.”

She adds, “Grandfather Blow smoked a pipe most of his life – a fact which some would say should have shortened his life. When he was 95, Prince Albert Smoking Tobacco used his picture in their ad.”

Mrs. Bailey, however, has never smoked and has never fancied alcoholic beverages.

If you ask her what vices she does have, she laughs and says with a twinkle in her eye. “Oh. I’ve had many!”

Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Getting ready for her 100th birthday party
Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Centenarian needs only a walker to get around
Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Life has taught Jane Bailey-He who thinks he can
Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Mrs Bailey watches her daughter Betty Schreiber cut her birthday cake

 


 

Relationship between Jennie “Jane” May Hoagland & Robin Melissa BOSWORTH:

Jennie “Jane” May Hoagland (1881 – 1986)
2nd great-aunt

***

Maria Elizabeth BLOW (1854 – 1953)
Mother of Jennie “Jane” May Hoagland
Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND (1880 – 1961)
Son of Maria Elizabeth BLOW
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
Daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
Son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa BOSWORTH
The daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH

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Dundee Pioneer Charles Blow A Hero at 94 Years Old

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Mr and Mrs Charles Blow of Dundee - 63rd Wedding Anniv
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Blow of Dundee, Illinois

 

The Rock Island Argus

July 18, 1913

Page 9

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HUSBAND, 94, SAVES WIFE FROM FLAMES

Stairway Crashes as Aged Man Bears Helpmate Away from Burning House.

***

Muscatine, Iowa, July 18

Heroism which parallels that of genuine fiction was exhibited by Charles Blow, 94 years old, from possible death in a fire which totally destroyed the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Contriman at Fruitland yesterday.

The aged people were in the home alone at the time of the fire. They have been guests at the Contriman home for the past several weeks, coming here from their home at Elgin, Ill. Their daughter, Mrs. Contriman was out in the pasture while Mr. Contriman was in the field.

The fire was discovered by Mr. Blow just as he had descended to the kitchen preparatory toward securing his breakfast. Considerable headway has already been made by the fire, a gust of flame enveloping him as he opened the kitchen door. Staggering from the noxious fumes he pluckily made his way upstairs where his wife was dressing. The aged woman was almost prostrated by the smoke which filled the upstairs portion of the dwelling and her husband practically carried her down the flight of the stairs. The passageway was dense with smoke and the two old people were compelled to fight their way to safety blindly. Flames singed the hair of both although neither was otherwise injured.

Barely a minute after they reached fresh air, the stairway crashed in.

The home was burned to the ground in its entirety. Nothing was saved. The loss to the furniture is estimated at about $1,500, while to the dwelling about $1,2000. The house was owned by Theodore Drake, a well known Muscatine Island resident. But a small amount of insurance was carried. The dwelling had recently been remodeled but since the improvements the insurance had not been increased.

Mr. and Mrs. Contriman had made their home in Fruitland since last February coming here from Chicago.


Charles BLOW (1820 – 1919)
My 3rd great-grandfather
 
Maria Elizabeth BLOW (1854 – 1953)
daughter of Charles BLOW
 
 
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
 
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
 
Robin Melissa BOSWORTH
Me, the daughter of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH

Mr. Charles Blow and his wife, Lucy Flude Knott, are my 3x great grandparents.

 


 

Submitted by Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa Bosworth Reininger

Celia M. Sears Hoagland, Death Notice- Nov. 9, 1889

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Elgin Every Saturday

Elgin, Kane, Illinois, USA

Celia M. Sears Hoagland, Death Notice
9 Nov 1889

Celia M., wife of Zephaniah C. Hoagland, died very suddenly at her home 186 Kimball Street, Nov. 4th, aged 64 years. Two weeks ago she had a paralytic stroke, though up to that time in good health. She was apparently recovering, when a second stroke carried her off. She came to Elgin in 1849 and has always been much respected and beloved. She leaves five children to mourn for her.


Celia Mary SEARS (1825 – 1889)

My 3rd great-grandmother

Samuel Campbell HOAGLAND (1855 – 1940)
son of Celia Mary SEARS

Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND (1880 – 1961)
son of Samuel Campbell HOAGLAND

Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND

Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND

Me – the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

Maria Elizabeth (Blow) Hoagland of Dundee, Illinois, Pioneer Family

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Maria Elizabeth (Blow) Hoagland (1854-1953)
Maria Elizabeth (Blow) Hoagland (1854-1953) cited in the Chicago Tribune for turning 98 years old. My father wrote “Chicago Tribune” on the photocopy. This clipping was in my grandmother, Helen Hoagland’s, family history collection.

 

Maria Elizabeth (BLOW) Hoagland (1854 – 1953), my 2nd great-grandmother
 
Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND (1880 – 1961), son of Maria Elizabeth BLOW
 
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965), daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
 
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – ), son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
Me, the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

Franklin Smith Bosworth (1832-1919)

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Franklin Smith Bosworth (1832-1919)

 

Commemorative Record, Biographies, Portraits, Kane and Kendall Counties, Illinois 2
Photo of the book Commemorative Record, Biographies, Portraits, Kane and Kendall Counties, Illinois that I found in the Milwaukee Library. The entry for Franklin Smith Bosworth is contained therein.
Franklin Smith Bosworth Entry Commemorative Record etc
Entry for Franklin Smith Bosworth in the Commemorative biographical and historical record of Kane County, Illinois

 

Franklin S. BOSWORTH – a native of Boston, Erie Co., New York, and son of Benjamin F. and Almira SMITH BOSWORTH.  The father was born in Greenfield, New York, and was the son of Alfred BOSWORTH, born in Bristol, Rhode Island, of English parentage.  Alfred came west in the fall of 1839, to Dundee, Ill. where he died in June 1861.  He followed the hatter’s trade, and later farming.  He married Olive CHILD of New York, and they had 6 children: Benjamin F., Oliver C., Increase C., Lucinda C., Mary C. wife of Harry WEED, Lucinda wife of Alfred EDWARDS and Abbie M, wife of Benj. SIMONDS; all are now deceased.      

Dr. Benjamine F. BOSWORTH the father practiced medicine til his removal to Illinois; locating in Chicago in 1856, he engaged in merchandising in that place until his removal to McHenry, Ill where he conducted a mercatile establishment until his death in Sept. 1843. (transcribers note: these dates are as given. Perhaps reversed?)His wife was the daughter of Amos SMITH, of NY.        

Franklin S. BOSWORTH, their only child, was born Dec. 17, 1832. He began merchandising in 1852, in connection with I.C. BOSWORTH, at Dundee, Ill. until June 1871, when he removed to Elgin.  There he pruchased [sic] interest in an east side hardware store, until Sept. 1883 when he sold to Metcalf and Reed.  1888 he purchased part of a coal and lumber yard – 1896 he became partners with his son Frank H. BOSWORTH.      

Jan 1859 he married Miss Sarah E. HUNT of Dundee, daughter of Ward E. and Mary HUNT, her father a native of Vermont. 4 BOSWORTH children: Reuben H., Edward, married to Bertha McCLURE of Elgin;  Mary, wife of Walter SKEELE; and Frank H. 

Mr. BOSWORTH was elected mayor of Elgin in 1880, for 2 terms. 

Biographical Record of Kane Co., Ill.S.J. Clarke Publishing Co.Chicago, Ill  1898 page 42


 

Franklin Smith Bosworth-Genealogy of the Child Childs and Childe families of the past and present in the United States and the Canadas
Franklin Smith Bosworth Entry in the Genealogy of the Child Childs and Childe families of the past and present in the United States and the Canadas book

Franklin Smith Bosworth-Kane County Illinois History
Entry for Franklin Smith Bosworth-Kane County Illinois History

Franklin Smith BOSWORTH (1832 – 1919)
2nd great-grandfather

Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1870 – 1919)
son of Franklin Smith BOSWORTH

Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
son of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH

Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.
 
Me, the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

A Letter from Alfred Bosworth (1773-1861) – to His Brother Hezekiah

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Alfred Bosworth’s Letter to His Brother Hezekiah

 

Alfred BOSWORTH (1773 – 1861)
4th great-grandfather
Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D. (1801 – 1843)
son of Alfred BOSWORTH
Franklin Smith BOSWORTH (1832 – 1919)
son of Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D.
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1870 – 1919)
son of Franklin Smith BOSWORTH
Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
son of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.
Me

James Knott 1804–1874, Elgin’s Grocer

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b23bec8d-2a68-48e0-923a-b5f781b3c24f
James Knott – Grocery Store Advertisement “The Past and present of Kane County, Illinois : containing a history of the county, its cities, towns, &c., a directory of its History of Kane County, Ill. – The northern counties gazetteer and directory, for 1855-6 – November, 1855”

When James Knott was born about 1804, in Leicester, Leicestershire, England, his father, Thomas, was 13 and his mother, Anna, was 17. He was married three times and had three sons and two daughters. He died on March 5, 1874, in Elgin, Illinois, at the age of 70, and was buried there.

James KNOTT (1804 – 1874)

My 4th great-grandfather

 
Lucy Flude KNOTT (1828 – 1916)
daughter of James KNOTT & Deborah FLUDE
 
Maria Elizabeth BLOW (1854 – 1953)
daughter of Lucy Flude KNOTT
 
Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND (1880 – 1961)
son of Maria Elizabeth BLOW
 
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
 
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
 
Me
The daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

 

James Knott married Deborah Flude in 1822 in Leicester, Leicestershire, when he was 18 years old.

St. Nicholas Church – “England Marriages, 1538–1973 ,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NJ8W-TQK : accessed 24 February 2016), James Knott and Debora Flude, 25 Aug 1822; citing St. Nicholas, Leicester, Leicester, England, ref

Read about Deborah Flude by clicking on this link:

https://thetenderlyrosecollection.wordpress.com/2016/08/30/deborah-flude-1800-1847/


 

Excerpt from British History Online

“Of the other early shoemakers, James Knott advertised himself in 1842 as a ‘Fashionable Boot and Shoe Manufacturer’, who supplied the trade as well as private customers and executed shipping orders. He continued to appear with his son, Thomas, in the lists of boot and shoe manufacturers until 1850.”

‘The City of Leicester: Footwear manufacture’, A History of the County of Leicester: volume 4: The City of Leicester (1958), pp. 314-326. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.

My note: Is it possible that the author of this history may have listed James as the father of Thomas in error. In my research, Thomas Knott was the father of James Knott. But, I am just beginning to gather information on this family, so I may be incorrect in my information. Would love to hear from anyone familiar with this family.


 

After Deborah’s death in 1847, James Knott arrived in America on June 28, 1849 in New York, New York after a 38 day voyage on the ship named Guy Mannering. The ship’s manifest lists James Knott 45, William Knott 18, Anne Knott 20, Eliz. Knott 16 and Fred Knott 12. His oldest child, Lucy, my GGG Grandmother, was not listed on the manifest with her family. I found she had traveled ahead of the family to America and was living with her Uncle John Knott in Chicago at the time of her family’s arrival.


Around 1849-1851, James Knott married Elizabeth Anne Hawly (1800-1852) in Illinois.


On the 1850 U.S. Federal Census the family is living in the Town of Elgin, Kane County, Illinois. The census lists James Knott 46, Elisabeth Knott 26, Elisabeth Knott 18, Frederick J. Knott 13. Only James is listed as having been born in Illinois. On the ship’s manifest for James Knott upon arrival to the U.S., an Elizabeth is listed, so at least that would indicated she was born in England, not Illinois. The same page of the census also shows his father, Thomas Knott 61 with Ann Knott 63-both born in England-his occupation is “Tanner or Tuner”.

James Knott 1850 US Federal Census
1850 U.S. Federal Census entry for James Knott, Elgin, Kane, Illinois

 


 

After the death of James’ second wife, Elizabeth Hawly, he then married Charlotte Bunce on November 18, 1852.

Charlotte Bunce-James Knott Marriage Cook County IL Marriage and Death Indexes 1833-1889
Charlotte Bunce-James Knott Marriage, Cook County IL Marriage and Death Indexes 1833-1889

 


 

James Knott is listed on the Illinois State Census for 1855 as residing in Elgin, Kane, Illinois.


 

A U.S. IRS Tax Assessment List for Illinois, District 2, for 1862-1864 lists James Knott as “Retail Dealer”, but then that was crossed out and it looks like “Butcher” was written beside it. Another U.S. IRS Tax Assessment List for the same district lists James Knott as “Retail Dealer”.


On the 1870 U.S. Census for Elgin, Kane, Illinois, James Knott is listed as “Retired Merchant” with possible wife (3 years younger), Charlotte Knott & Margaret Bunce (whom I found on a census in PA with George F. Knott on same page – Marg. was listed as domestic) at same address.


James Knott is listed as buried in the Channing Street Cemetery (Channing Street Cemetary Sexton’s Certificates) on March 5, 1874, however, the Channing Street Cemetery was “repurposed” for the building of a school. The story is here:

http://www.elginroots.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=18&Itemid=146


James Knott - Elgin Pioneer Grocer 1
James Knott – Elgin, IL, “The Pioneer in the Exclusive Grocery Trade”
James Knott - Elgin Pioneer Grocer 2
James Knott – Elgin, IL, “The Pioneer in the Exclusive Grocery Trade”
James Knott - Elgin Pioneer Grocer 3
James Knott – Elgin, IL, “The Pioneer in the Exclusive Grocery Trade”
James Knott - Elgin Pioneer Grocer 4
James Knott – Elgin, IL, “The Pioneer in the Exclusive Grocery Trade”