Morris Family Tree

My Aunt Alice Visited Me After All These Years… And I Think I Know Why

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My Aunt Alice Visited Me After All These Years…

And I Think I Know Why

Alice Claire Frank and David Harkness Morris of Mississippi Gulf Coast

 

I woke up this morning with my Aunt Alice on my mind. At first, I had no idea why she came to me. But, it was fun thinking about her and her love for me was comforting. I thought of all the fun we had I had when I visited my Uncle Dad and Aunt Alice Morris in Pineville, Mississippi – an area of what was “country” to me in the Long Beach area of the Mississippi Gulf Coast. When I was a girl, they lived on the property established by Aunt Alice’s father as a dairy farm and business. Her folks were still living there in the house – the Franks – and I enjoyed visiting with them and getting to know them when I was younger. The Franks were good people! I thought their farm was paradise. There was a large pecan grove, a big barn, outbuildings and plenty of animals. Glorious!

At one time, my Uncle David started raising quail in the big barn. He would let us go out and look at the quail operation. He sold the quail for meat. When it was Easter time, we brought quail eggs back home and dyed them just for fun. Quail eggs are pretty small, but, they are beautiful! We boiled them and dyed them along with our regular chicken eggs. My grandmother, Mamaw, would even pickle quail eggs. I would bring home quail eggs and twice used them as elementary level school science projects that landed me in the city-wide science fair. Once, I made first place! I loved raising the baby quail I hatched in my little incubator. Uncle David and Aunt Alice were proud of me.

My Aunt Alice had a smile that radiated through her eyes – the joy shone through. She had a way of making me feel good about myself. She appreciated the way I would watch over her little girls as a big sister would. This would give her some freedom and rest for a little bit. She and Uncle David had four girls –  my sweet cousins – built in best friends. But that is a handful! Did I mention Renee and Rhonda’s spunkiness? It was a thing. A FUN thing. I felt close to that family and they loved me ever bit as much as I loved them. It is something that is hard to put in words sometimes. I can hear the laughter still today and it has been many, many years that have passed since I saw last saw my Aunt Alice and her girls together.

On the occasion of my high school graduation, my Aunt Alice gave me a questionable and definitely unexpected gift that made me scratch my head. (I have to bust out laughing every time I think about it now.) She gave me a sea-foam green negligee. I was shocked! I hate sea-foam green, always have. Sea-foam green reminds me of hospital walls. The negligee, well, okay, then. I would not know what women wore those things for until a few years passed. I was still in my flannel phase when it came to pajamas. Momma, a Southern Baptist, was floored. I opened it and very appreciatively and respectfully gave my sweet Aunt Alice thanks. She was so proud! She fully expected to flabbergast my mother, I could see it in her eyes. She meant to rile my mother up. She laughed! She said that I would need that in the years to come. Aunt Alice was full of life and passion! Enough said. I loved her all the more for her gumption. I don’t remember ever wearing the negligee and I don’t know what happened to it. I suspect my mother intervened, don’t you?

Although I never got “preached to” by her, Aunt Alice had a way of conveying her spiritual beliefs and I went to church with the her and Morris girls a few times when I spent the weekends with them, which was several times a year. And. I. Loved. Going. To. Pineville. I loved going to their little church in Pineville, too. 

I felt freedom at the Frank/Morris farm. I fell in love with everything to do with country life. Even mucking out the chicken house. But, I felt the true sense of what it was like to grow up with a momma and daddy at a time I was living in a fatherless home. I saw the love in Aunt Alice’s face when she was with Uncle David. I learned from her that you could love a man whole-heartedly even when you disagreed with him. And I saw my Uncle David’s love for Aunt Alice. I saw she loved her parents very, very much and they loved her. It did my soul such good to see a family living together. Two generations with much respect going both ways. Aunt Alice had a good soul and shared her joy with all of us.

Uncle David and Aunt Alice did love their beer on the weekends. Uncle David turned us girls lose in the pecan grove with big burlap sacks and told us to pick up pecans that had fallen on the ground. He gave us fifty cents for a full bag. The bags were waist high on me and I was the tallest one of us kids in my family and theirs because I was the oldest. That was a lot of work, but, it was fun. I have never forgotten the smell of the pecan grove. I don’t know how to describe it, but, I have dearly missed it. Every fall, is still pecan time for me. I noticed Uncle David and Aunt Alice would leave us in the grove (right next to the house) and they would go drink beer with Momma and Mamaw on their front porch. Momma and Mamaw did not drink beer. At. All. They had coffee, thank you very much! That must have been a respite for all four of them to let us run wild while they rested from work.

The days I am thinking’ of were before the youngest daughter was born. She was born when I was around 17 and I loved to hold her. But, even after the youngest was born and was a toddler, I went camping with them on the Wolf River on our Uncle Johnny Morris’ private property – it even had a beach! They loved to fish, I loved to swim. Heaven. Some of the best days of my childhood were spent loving the Morris cousins and my beloved uncle and aunt. They were so good to me. I associate the word “freedom” with that family.

My Aunt Alice and Uncle David married when she was just 16 according to Mamaw. He was a tall and very  handsome man. She was a stunning beauty. They both had the most beautiful eyes and smile. I did some of Aunt Alice’s family tree in connection with my family tree on Ancestry.com. Her ancestry was fascinating and her family history surprised me because I knew so little, really, about her background. I remember associating the Franks with German background when I was growing up. And I seem to remember some sort of foreign accent with Poppa Frank, but, that memory is now too far away in my mind and I may not be remembering correctly. I just know that marriages were strong in that family. And family was everything…

Except… the bowling alley (and church). I was luck enough to be the one in my family that got to hang out with the Morris cousins the most. They would pick me up and we’d all go to the bowling alley in Gulfport. My aunt and uncle were dang near professional when it came to bowling. They were in leagues. That was professional in my mind. They had their own bowling shoes and bowling ball. I was so going to have my own bowling equipment one day. I wanted to follow in their footsteps. But, actually, when they were bowling, they were all business. They won prizes for bowling while I ran with their daughters as what I now would call being “bowling alley rats”. We played in the background and I kept an eye on my cousins as my aunt and uncle seriously bowled. They were in tournaments. I was so amazed at them.

Aunt Alice went to tech school to get her diploma in medical records transcription. She went to work at Gulfport Memorial Hospital. She was “smart-as-a-whip”, as my mother liked to say about her. All four of my Morris cousins were smart-as-a-whip, too. I saw my Aunt Alice as a “women’s libber” and I saw she raised her daughters that way, too. She did not take any sh*t from nobody. That was something I admired in her. She could have a hot-temper, but, only if it was deserved. She had a strong will and a strong mind. I hope I have incorporated Aunt Alice into my life. I think I have, but, I could use more of her personality in my life. She knew how to have fun. I miss her laughter. And the expressions she made with her face. She could be so funny.

My Uncle David was in the Air Force and was a staff sergeant at Keesler Air Force Base. I remember visiting him at his office at Keesler. I was raised an Air Force Brat, so, anytime we had to go to the doctor, it was to Keesler A.F.B. hospital and clinic. Uncle David’s office (in an old barracks building) nearby. He was very handsome in a uniform I must say! Aunt Alice was proud of him, I could tell even if she did not say it out loud.

So, this was all in my head as I lie in bed this morning thinking about her. Sometimes I feel the angels in our lives come to us in the nighttime. Are they truly guardian angels? That is what I believed as a child. I think it is true now as well. I feel them the most in the morning and sometimes during the night. I will experience the need to get up and write about the special one I have on my mind. I think they are there for a reason. They seem so fresh in my memory. No years have passed, we have not aged. Sometimes I cry because I miss them so much, but, comforted that they have come back to visit.

In the 1990’s my mother sent me a precious ceramic figurine one year for Christmas from Mississippi when I lived in Palm Harbor, Florida. She said my Aunt Alice had made it in her sister’s ceramic shop. I had no idea Aunt Alice was crafty! Such painting talent! Is Aunt Alice’s spirit attached to that ceramic cow? All these years I have kept that Holstein cow on my kitchen window sill, until sometime a year or go I had moved it to my dining room hutch fearing I might accidentally break it. But, yesterday, I moved the cow back to my kitchen window sill, to make room for a little memorial shelf dedicated to my little Westie, Polie, who went to Rainbow Bridge last week. Was she sending me a sign that she was happy to be back on her window sill? I often thought of her as I washed dishes. Did she help me fix the memorial for Polie knowing she loved critters as much as I do?

Did Aunt Alice come to me to comfort me after the death of my sweet little doggie this past week? She passed years ago. I had not thought of her for some time, since the cow was no longer on my kitchen window sill, and now she shows up at a time I am feeling very spiritual about my dog. She was one of the great animal lovers in my life. She always had a dog or two hanging around on the farm. She re-homed our mean Shetland Pony and told me the pony drank coffee with her on her front porch. She loved him when he bit most of us kids. This is why I woke up and went straight to my laptop to record my memories and thoughts of her, so I would not lose them. I smile because I am comforted by thinking of the love Aunt Alice and Uncle David gave me. Without a doubt, I am grateful and I am blessed.

And now, the cardinal couple just appeared at my bird feeder. Angels watchin’ over me…

 


 

Alice Claire “Frank” Morris (11 AUG 1938 – 13 OCT 1999)

Martha M (Park) Wright 1826-1909

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Martha M Park Wright 1826-1909
Martha M Park Wright 1826-1909, Moss Point, Mississippi

 

When Martha M. (Park) was born on June 17, 1826, in Athens, Georgia, her father was Baptist Park and her mother was Frances. She married James P. Wright in 1845 in Jackson, Butts, Georgia when she was 19 years old. They had one child, Frances M. “Fanny” during their marriage.

In 1840, when Martha was 14 years old, her mother, Frances “Fanny” (Chandler) Park, died. 

In 1845, Martha married James P. Wright. She was 19 years old. January 8, 1845 brought Martha a daughter in Georgia whom she named Frances “Fanny”.

According to an 1850 Census: Martha lived in Jackson,  Butts County, Georgia – Subdivision 45. The census lists Baptist Park 50 as a farmer, Martha M. Wright 22, Frances V. Parks 20, Nancy C. Parks 18, Frances M. Wright 5.
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The Grand Encampment and Grand Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of Mississippi Fifty-Seventh Annual Session, at Scranton, Mississippi, May 6, 1895

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1895-05-10 The Pascagoula Democrat Star

The Odd Fellows


Fifty-Seventh Annual Session,
AT SCRANTON, MISS., MAY 6, 1895


The Grand Encampment and Grand Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of Mississippi, held their annual session in Scranton this week. The attendance upon each has been larger than for many years, and although the past year has been one of much financial depression, the reports of the Grand Officers, and statements of Individual members of the Grand Bodies, all indicate a healthy growth, several new lodges having been organized and some dormant ones revived.
The Grand Encampment met in its forty-third annual session on Monday morning at 10 o’clock, in the Odd Fellows Hall. The following Grand Officers being in their respective stations:


T. C. Billups, Columbus, Grand Patriarch.
Samuel French, Vicksburg, Grand High Priest.
F. W. Olin, Jackson Grand Senior Warden.
Jacob Fach, Summit, Grand Junior Warden.
Isaac D. Blumenthal, Holly Springs, Grand Scribe.
J. L. Power, Jackson, Acting Grand Treasurer.
W. B. Bradberry, Holly Springs, Grand Marshal.
H. C. Orman, Grenada, Grand Sentinel.


The Grand Patriarch, Grand Scribe, Grand Treasurer and Grand Representative made their reports.
The death of John H. McKenzie, Grand Treasurer, on April 25th, was announced, and a committee appointed to prepare a suitable tribute to that prominent and useful member of the order.


There were twelve Encampments represented, as follows:
Vicksburg, No. 2.—W. E. Blything, C. C. Kent.
Choctaw, No. 3.—A. Fichelman.
Tombigbee, No. 6.—J. L. Walker
Monroe, No. 9.—Phil. Chrisman.
Morning Star, No. 14.—S. R. Stewart.
Pontotoc, No. 17.—John Rowzee.
Theobold, No. 20.—J. W. Cunningham, J. D. Cleary.
Mt. Sinai, No. 21.—Geo. L. Gray.
Eureka, No. 22.—C. H. Garland.
Mamre, No. 28.—M. C. Oolgaardt.
Cyclone, No. 31.—H. M. Buckley.
Scranton, No. 32.—H. S. Rourke, S. H. Bugge, J. P. Fox.
At the night session the Grand Encampment was formally received by Scranton Encampment No. 32. The welcome address being delivered by Vincent Ros, and responded to by Wm. M. Strickland, of Holly Springs.
The following were elected Grand officers:
Samuel French, Vicksburg, Grand Patriarch.
F. W. Olin, Jackson, Grand High Priest.
W. B. Bradberry, Holly Springs, Grand Senior Warden.
Isaac D. Blumenthal, Holly Springs, Grand Scribe.
J. L. Power, Jackson, Grand Treasurer.
J. H. Rolls, Scranton, Grand Junior Warden.
H. C. Orman, Grenada, Grand Marshal.
H. M. Blything, Vicksburg, Grand Sentinel.

THE GRAND LODGE
The fifty-seventh annual session of the Grand Lodge met at 10 o’clock on Tuesday morning, the following Grand officers being in their respective stations:
Ellis T. Har, Grand Master.
C. L. Lincoln, Deputy Grand Master.
Simon Fried, Grand Warden.
Walter S. P. Doty, Grand Secretary.
J. L. Power, Acting Grand Treasurer.
W. J. Webb, Grand Chaplain.
William Jackson, Grand Marshall.
Theo. Baker. Grand Conductor.
Samuel French, Grand Guardian.
H. C. Nelson, Grand Herald.
Lodges were represented, as follows:
Mississippi, No. 1.—Wm. James.
Warren, No. 3.—F. A. Musgrove, J. W. Short.
Franklin, No. 5.—Geo. W. Acker.
Grenada, No. 6.—W. B. Barnes.
Macon, No.3.—F. C. Kent.
Wilkinson, No. 10.—Martin Rotschild.
Capitol, No. 11.—L. Schwartz, J. H. Taylor.
Jefferson, No. 14.—Jas. McClure
Stockman, No. 19.—W. B. Patty.
Wildy, No. 21.—O. L. McKay.
Ridgely, No. 23.—B. L. H. Wright.
Holly Springs, No. 30.—W. C. Tilton.
Union. No. 35.—T. B. Franklin.
Quitman, No. 36.—Jno. E. McClurg.
Okolona, No. 37.—Jno. D. Cleary.
Carrollton, No. 40.—C. C. Doty.
Pontontoc, No. 44.—H. C. Stanford.
Scranton, No. 45.—S. H. Bugge.
Central, No. 49.—T. P. Terry.
New Albany, No.73—W. A. Liddell.
Enterprise, No. 79.—Jas. McGee.
Meridian, No. 80.—J. P. Young, O. F. Temple.
Water Valley, No. 82.—J. S. Wilkes.
Star, No. 84.—Tal Hibbler.
Summit, No. 95.—J. R. Jewell.
Greenville, No. 94.—J. A. Newman.
Yazoo City, No. 102.—E. Schaefer.
Goodwille, No. 104.—H. L. Arnold.
Reliance, No. 107.—J. W. Sandell.
Charleston, No. 108.—Jas. McCorkle.
Copiah, No. 109.—J. Dampeer.
A. B. Longstreet, No. 113.—W. H. Baird.
L. Q. C. Lamar, No. 114.—W. B. Bailey.
Amory, No. 115.—R. P. Dilworth.
Jackson, No. 116.—Wm. Hemingway.
Moss Point, No. 117.—D. E. Morris.
Greenwood, No. 118.—M. Anderson.
Three Oaks, No. 121.—Jno. S. Davis.
Bay St. Louis, No. 122.—J. Heitzman.


Also, the following Past Grands, not representatives:
Leland Henderson, No. 22; J. P. Fox, C. L. Price, Jos. W. Allman, ___ Cunningham, No. 45; S. T. Holberg, No. 19; C. W. Garner, No. 117; N. S. Walker, No. 5.
The report of Grand Master, Grand Secretary, Grand Treasurer and Grand Representatives were submitted and referred to the appropriate committees.
Grand Secretary reported three new lodges and two revived during the year, and total membership to last December term 1,616.
The report of Grand Representatives. Sowed an addition of nearly thirty thousand members to the order during the past year, with a total membership of nearly one million in the jurisdiction of the Sovereign Grand Lodge. The benefits during 1895 amounting to about $3, 500, 000.
Aberdeen was selected as the place of next session, by unanimous vote. The lodge at that place will then celebrate its fiftieth anniversary.


The following were elected Grand officers:
C. L. Lincoln, Columbus, Grand Master.
Simon Fried, Starkville, Deputy Grand Master.
L. F. Chiles, Jackson, Grand Warden.
Walter S. P. Doty, Grenada, Grand Secretary.
J. L. Power, Jackson, Grand Treasurer.
Dr. A. D. Hutchinson, Columbus, Grand Representative.
Other officers to be appointed by the Grand Master elect.


A formal reception took place at the Courthouse at 5 o’clock, p.m., when Mayor Allman delivered the address of welcome, responded to by Past Grand Master Wiley N. Nash.
After a ride to Moss Point, and enjoying its hospitalities, the brethren returned to Scranton, where all the Coast Lodges united in a public reception in the Odd FellowsHll. Vincent Ros delivered the address of welcome, and Hon. M. M. Evans responded.
The secret work of the Order was then exemplified by Grand Representative Isaac D. Blumenthal.
The Grand Lodge, after a brief business session on Wednesday morning, entered upon the program arranged for the day—the excursion to Horn Island. A special train took the Grand Lodge and Grand Encampment, resident members of the Order and invited guests, to Moss Point, where they were joined by Moss Point Lodge and friends. The fleet for the excursion consisted of five steam tugs—Leo, Fox, Native Victor and Eva, two large barges and a schooner, and when these returned to Colle’s wharf, at Scranton, and took on the large party there waiting, the excursionists numbered fully one thousand. It was an afternoon of supreme pleasure to all. The committees of arrangements were indefatigable in their attention to their guests. The Escatawpa band discoursed excellent music, and if the young people had dancing space they certainly would have taken advantage of it.
On nearing the Island the “basket dinner” was spread on one of the barges, and there was not only an abundance for the party, but scores of baskets were not opened. And it was all of the very best, and never was a feast better served or more thoroughly enjoyed. The waiters included a Lieutenant-Governor, and many other gentlemen and ladies, who seemed to be expert in the business of feeding the hungry.
The Leo took quite a large party out into the Gulf, but none complained of sea-sickness. All got back in good time, and all expressed themselves delighted—one enthusiastic visitor from North Mississippi remarking, “this is a red-letter day in the history of our Order in Mississippi.”
The Grand Lodge re-assembled at 8 o’clock, and remained in session until 11 o’clock, when it finally adjourned. Many important reports were considered and adopted. The representatives made verbal reports as to the condition of their Lodges. A committee was appointed to prepare special resolutions of thanks for the innumerable courtesies of the sessions. The Grand Officers elect were duly installed, after which Past Grand Master J. L. Power made a brief address of congratulation and exhortation, and then the new Grand Master announced the appointive Grand Officers and standing committees, as follows:
Grand Marshal—Wm. James, Natchez.
Grand Conductor—W. B. Bradberry, Holly Springs.
Grand Herald—N. H. Bryant.
Grand Guardian—Samuel French.
The Grand Chaplain will be heretofore announced.
Judicial Committee—Isaac T. Hart, Percy Somerville, C. L. Tubb.
Finance Committee—O. L. Kimbrough, O. L. McKay, Jas. McClure.

THE ODD FELLOWS AT PASCAGOULA
An informal meeting of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of the village of Pascagoula was held at 11 o’clock a.m. Tuesday. Messrs. W. O. Clark, C. L. Johnson, H. F. Krebs and F. B. Walker were appointed a committee to tender the visiting Odd Fellows and their brethren a reception at Pascagoula, Captain G. H. Howze having tendered a free train on the Moss Point and Pascagoula railroad for that purpose. The invitation was extended and accepted at the evening session of the Grand Lodge, and the Odd Fellows arrived at Pascagoula at 6:15 p.m., when they were escorted to the “Cottage by the Sea” to partake of a sumptuous supper prepared for them in the spacious dining hall of that popular hostelry, Mayor Volney Brown, on behalf of the village, and Mr. H. F. Krebs made a few remarks of welcome, which were answered in a well delivered speech by Mr. C. L. Tubb, of Aberdeen.
Supper was proceeded with and the wants of the guests were attended to by the hostess, Mr. A. C. Bradford, assisted by Mrs. G. F. Southard, Mrs. E. D. Dean and Miss Addie Clark.

 

Moss Point Odd Fellows’ Celebration at the residence of Mr. John Wesley Morris

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The Pascagoula Democrat Star

May 4, 1894

Odd Fellows’ Celebration.


Last Friday night at the residence of Mr. John W. Morris Moss Point Lodge N. 117 I. O. O. F. gave a grand celebration in honor of the 75th anniversary of the order. The lodge occupied the spacious gallery of the residence and the guests were seated under the large oaks. The grounds were beautifully lighted. After the opening ceremonies of the lodge, readings descriptive of the objects and purposes of Odd Fellowship were given by Messrs. C. M. Fairley and R. W. Cowan, and the exercises concluded with an able, interesting and instructive address on the past, present and future of Odd Fellowship by Prof. M. Caldwell, whose remarks were warmly applauded. After its conclusion all present were invited to partake of the good things prepared for their entertainment. It was the unanimous expression that the occasion had been a most delightful and profitable one and will be the means of increasing interest in this noble order. Moss Point Lodge No 117 was organized with six members Sept. 13, 1893, and during its short life has increased to thirty-four members, and its good influence has been felt in this community. The present officers are: J. W. Stewart, P. G.; D. E. Morris, N. G.; C. W. Garner, V. G.; A. F. Dantzler, secretary and Chas H. Wood, treasurer.


John Wesley MORRIS (1839 – 1896) was my great-great grandfather.

David Edmund “D.E.” MORRIS (1866 – 1934), son of John Wesley MORRIS

John Harkness MORRIS (1901 – 1965), son of David Edmund “D.E.” MORRIS

Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013), daughter of John Harkness MORRIS

Me,  the daughter of Janie Lucille MORRIS

 

 

D. E. Morris in Moss Point Odd Fellows Lodge

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The Pascagoula Democrat-Star
May 04, 1894

Moss Point Secret Societies


Moss Point Lodge N. 117 I. O. F. [sic] meets every Monday night at K. of H. hall. D. E. Morris, N. G.; A. F. Dantzler, Secretary.


 

“I. O. O. F.” is an abbreviation of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. David Edmund “D. E.” Morris was my great grandfather and was best friends with the Dantzler family. – Note from TRose

D.E. Morris Purchases 40 Lumber Railroad Cars for Dantzler Mills

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1912-10-14 Daily Herald – Gulfport, Mississippi

40 CARS FOR DANTZLER MILLS

D.E. Morris Purchases Cars to Be Used In Moving Lumber of Big Company’s Mills

Gulfport, October 14

D.E. Morris, manager of the Dantzler Foundry, returned last night from Chicago, where he went to buy 40 lumber cars for the Dantzler Mills. The deal for these cars was practically closed, but it is not known when they will come forward. “The big truck line railroads,” says Mr. Morris, “are getting freight cars to relieve the congestion of freights along their lines. In the pursuance of this practice they will get cars which are billed to the roads owning and operating them, and convert them to their own use. Not in the history of railroading in the west has there been such a wild scramble for cars with which to move the grain crop to the exporting centers. The movement of the cotton crop also is creating an additional demand for cars.”

 


 

David Edmund “D.E.” MORRIS (1866 – 1934)
(My great-grandfather)
John Harkness MORRIS (1901 – 1965)
son of David Edmund “D.E.” MORRIS
Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013)
daughter of John Harkness MORRIS
Me-the daughter of Janie Lucille MORRIS