Wings of Angels Family Tree

Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth 1832-1908

Posted on Updated on

Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth
Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth, wife of Mayor Franklin Smith Bosworth and mother of Mayor Frank Hunt Bosworth

 

Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth

On October 17th, 1832 Sarah Emeline Hunt was born to Ward Ensign and Mary (Bascom) Hunt in Perrysburg, Cattaraugus, New York, USA. Ward Ensign Hunt was from Vermont and Mary Bascom from Massachusetts. Ward and Mary (Bascom) Hunt were very early pioneers of western New York.

Sarah’s parents had 12 children: Hiram Bascom Hunt (1818-1852), Henry Ensign Hunt (1819-1893), Rev. Ward Isaac Hunt(1820-1904), William Edwin Hunt (1822-1889), an infant-unknown name (1824-1824), Reuben Gay Hunt (1826-1861), Mary Elizabeth Hunt (1827-____), Joshua Bascom Hunt (1830-1835), George Hunt (1832-____), Sarah Emeline Hunt (1832-1908), Ellen Hunt (1834-1854) and Aaron Bascom Hunt (1837-1900).

Sarah Emeline Hunt was a teacher by training and experience. In the book “Biography of a Mind: Bosworth of Oberlin,” Sarah wrote an account of her life and in it she spoke of her mother “keeping abreast of current events. I remember her telling us that the Civil War was inevitable.” Widowed early in life, the mother was deeply religious and practically poised. “She would take me on horseback, in front or behind her,” to attend the Presbyterian church some four miles from the family farm in northwestern New York state. Sarah writes of her mother, Mary Bascom’s, influence upon her own life: “Parents should remember that in training children they are also training grandchildren indirectly.” 

In Cleveland, Cuyahoga, Ohio, Miss Hunt was a public school teacher and teacher at Collamer Academy. Later, Sarah Emeline Hunt taught at Notre Dame located in St. Joseph County, Indiana. It was there Sarah met her future husband, Franklin Smith Bosworth who was actually a student of hers. Both were of the same age at the time.

Sarah Emeline Hunt and Franklin Smith Bosworth (1832-1919) were joined in marriage Jan. 4, 1859 in Dundee, Kane County, Illinois. At that point it appears Sarah’s career in teaching ended.

In 1852, Franklin S. Bosworth was engaged in business with his uncle, Increase C. Bosworth, in Dundee.  A home tour in 1975 featured the Franklin Bosworth home at West Main and Fourth Streets in Dundee, Illinois as one of their homes of interest.

After about 20 years, Franklin and Sarah established their home in Elgin. An 1880 U. S. Census shows the couple and their daughter, Mary Abbie, along with a servant, Mary Moran, living at 37 Fulton Street. Franklin is listed on that census as a hardware merchant. Another census shows them at that home with their son, Frank Hunt Bosworth.

The Bosworths had four children: Reuben Hunt Bosworth (1859-1860), Dr. Edward Increase Bosworth (1861-1927) of Oberlin College, Mary Abbie Bosworth (1867-1942) and Frank Hunt Bosworth (1870-1919) a mayor of Elgin, Kane County, Illinois.

Sarah’s husband, Franklin S. Bosworth, held several terms as mayor of Elgin, Kane County, Illinois and her son Frank Hunt Bosworth was mayor of Elgin for one term.

In an 1877 newspaper article in the “Inter Ocean” mentioned Sarah’s membership in the Women’s Temperance Union in Kane County, Illinois.

The family attended the Congregational Church in Elgin, in which Franklin S. Bosworth held several official positions. We learn from another newspaper clipping that Sarah E. (Hunt) Bosworth, at the age of 57 years old, gave the welcoming speech at the local Baptist Church for the fifth annual meeting of The Ladies Home Missionary of the Congregational Church on May 21, 1890.

Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth passed away June 25, 1908 in Elgin, Kane County, Illinois. She is buried with her husband in Dundee Township Cemetery West in Kane County, the place they began their life together and raised their family.

——–

Respectfully submitted by Tenderly Rose Robin Melissa Bosworth, great great granddaughter of Franklin Smith and Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth – September 26, 2018


 

Sarah Emeline HUNT (1832 – 1908)
2nd great-grandmother

—–
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH I (1870 – 1919)
Son of Sarah Emeline HUNT
Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr. (1905 – 1990)
Son of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
Son of Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr.
Tenderly Rose Robin Melissa BOSWORTH
Tthe daughter of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

Advertisements

Dundee Pioneer Charles Blow A Hero at 94 Years Old

Posted on

Mr and Mrs Charles Blow of Dundee - 63rd Wedding Anniv
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Blow of Dundee, Illinois

 

The Rock Island Argus

July 18, 1913

Page 9

***

HUSBAND, 94, SAVES WIFE FROM FLAMES

Stairway Crashes as Aged Man Bears Helpmate Away from Burning House.

***

Muscatine, Iowa, July 18

Heroism which parallels that of genuine fiction was exhibited by Charles Blow, 94 years old, from possible death in a fire which totally destroyed the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Contriman at Fruitland yesterday.

The aged people were in the home alone at the time of the fire. They have been guests at the Contriman home for the past several weeks, coming here from their home at Elgin, Ill. Their daughter, Mrs. Contriman was out in the pasture while Mr. Contriman was in the field.

The fire was discovered by Mr. Blow just as he had descended to the kitchen preparatory toward securing his breakfast. Considerable headway has already been made by the fire, a gust of flame enveloping him as he opened the kitchen door. Staggering from the noxious fumes he pluckily made his way upstairs where his wife was dressing. The aged woman was almost prostrated by the smoke which filled the upstairs portion of the dwelling and her husband practically carried her down the flight of the stairs. The passageway was dense with smoke and the two old people were compelled to fight their way to safety blindly. Flames singed the hair of both although neither was otherwise injured.

Barely a minute after they reached fresh air, the stairway crashed in.

The home was burned to the ground in its entirety. Nothing was saved. The loss to the furniture is estimated at about $1,500, while to the dwelling about $1,2000. The house was owned by Theodore Drake, a well known Muscatine Island resident. But a small amount of insurance was carried. The dwelling had recently been remodeled but since the improvements the insurance had not been increased.

Mr. and Mrs. Contriman had made their home in Fruitland since last February coming here from Chicago.


Charles BLOW (1820 – 1919)
My 3rd great-grandfather
 
Maria Elizabeth BLOW (1854 – 1953)
daughter of Charles BLOW
 
 
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
 
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
 
Robin Melissa BOSWORTH
Me, the daughter of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH

Mr. Charles Blow and his wife, Lucy Flude Knott, are my 3x great grandparents.

 


 

Submitted by Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa Bosworth Reininger

Dundee Pioneer Charles Blow Member of the Old-Time Jimmy-Pipers Club at age of 94

Posted on Updated on

Charles Blow of Dundee and Elgin Illinois
This is an advertisement featuring Charles Blow of Dundee Illinois.

 

4 May 1915, Decatur, Illinois

The text insert located on the lower left-hand corner of this advertisement, just under the drawing illustrating Charles Blow, states:

“This is Charles Blow of Dundee, Ill., who tips the scales at 94 years. Mr. Blow is today, and always has been, a man who smoked his pipe liberally–and enjoyed it mightily. Mr. Blow qualifies for the Prince Albert “old-time jimmy-pipers club” and has been elected to full-fledged membership. We would like to hear from other old-time smokers.”


 

Charles Blow was married to Lucy Flude Knott

“Wings of Angels”

https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/5680810/person/-1416081224/facts

Charles BLOW (1820 – 1919)
My 3rd great-grandfather

 Maria Elizabeth BLOW (1854 – 1953)
daughter of Charles BLOW

 Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND (1880 – 1961)
son of Maria Elizabeth BLOW

 Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND

 Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND

Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa Bosworth
the daughter of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH

 

“The Flames” – Biloxi Business District in Ashes – October 13, 1894

Posted on Updated on

 

Biloxi Daily Herald

October 13, 1894

THE FLAMES

A PORTION OF THE PRINCIPAL STREET OF BILOXI IN ASHES.


Business Houses and Residences Were Burned Like so Much Chaff


LOSS ABOUT $75,000—INSURANCE $28,000.

Heroic Action of Firemen and Citizens


Biloxi has again been visited by a conflagration more sweeping in extent and entailing a financial loss greater than that of the fire of June, 1889. Friday morning about 2 o’clock a private watchman discovered flames issuing from the two-story building of Jos. W. Swetman, located on Pass Christian st., main thoroughfare, and in the most densely populated portion of the city. The alarm was sounded and the fire department turned out in quick order, but the flames had gained such headway that it was impossible to save the building and efforts of the firemen were directed to those adjoining. The Swetman building was occupied by J. W. Swetman a drug-store with sleeping apartments on the second floor occupied by his family, and so rapidly did the fire eat its way that the family were only able to hastily gather a few articles of clothing and make their escape. Another portion of this building on the first floor was occupied John W. Henley, as a oyster saloon. Adjoining the Swetman building, and on the west the fire quickly communicated to the engine room of Mechanics Fire Co., and from that to the Masonic Opera House, a large frame structure. Continuing its course west, on Pass Christian street, the two buildings owned by John Eistetter, one occupied by J. H. Murphy as a blacksmith shop, and the other by P. Ferzar, as a lunch house, were consumed as was also the tin shop belonging to Dan Markey, and a small residence, both in the rear and owned by Jno. Eistetter. Crossing Magnolia street the storehouse and dwelling of Miss St. Tual was soon in ashes. The fire in its eastern course was checked with the burning of the market-house of Felix Borries, by the most desperate and heroic work on the part of both firemen and citizens.


Before this time, however, buildings were burning in all directions, and it looked as if the larger portion of the city would be consumed before the wrath of the fiery monster was appeased. Opposite the Opera House the large two-story business house and dwelling of S. Picard was in flames, and in the flying cinders the intense heat almost immediately ignited the residence of W. K. M. Dukate, on the east and a cottage on Magnolia street, owned by N. Voivedich and occupied by F. W. Eaton. With the destruction of the last named building the flames were, checked on Magnolia street, although the house south of it and occupied by T. E. Colline, was badly scorched.

On the south side of Pass Christian street the residence of Mrs. Rich and a small building adjoining, occupied as a candy store were being rapidly reduced to ashes only to be followed in quick succession by the building occupied by Joseph Lawrence as a shoe shop, and the barber shop J. Kilk both owned by George Ohr, Sr. From the barber shop the next to fall a prey to the fiery demon was the large two-story building owned by Chas. Redding and occupied by him as a residence and grocery store. South of Redding’s a cottage belonging to Dr. J. J. Lemon and occupied by Mrs. Kelty, was burned as was also a two-story cottage adjoining, belonging to Geo. Ohr, Sr. On the north side of Pass Christian st., and east of the Swetman building, four small buildings owned by the same gentlemen, were destroyed—one of these was without a tenant and the other occupied by Sing Lee as a laundry; H. Eikel, merchant tailor; and Mrs. Ohr, grocer.


The fire in this direction was checked at the building owned by Mrs. Amare and occupied by Keel & Jennett, grocers. This building was damaged to the extent of about $100, and it seemed at times beyond the power of human beings to save the structure and it was only by almost superhuman efforts that the flames were checked at this point. The destruction of this building would have followed by the loss of many more, and with this appalling fact staring them in the face the firemen worked with redoubled vigor and until their hands and faces were scorched and blistered by the devouring element.


In the rear of the property last destroyed stood the famous pottery of Geo. E. Ohr, whose shop during the past severel [sic] years has been visited by hundreds of visitors from other sections and from almost every State in the Union, seeking relics in artistic pottery. In a few moments the toil and work of Ohr, the artistic potter, was reduced to ashes.

In the rear of the opera-house the planning mills of John R. Harkness & Sons, together with a large amount of finished work and lumber, was destroyed.


In the upper story of the opera-house were the lodge rooms of the Masons and Knights of Pythias. The regalia and all paraphernalia of both orders were completely destroyed, only the secretary’s and treasurer’s books of the Masonic order being saved.


On the ground floor of the opera-house was the office of the Postal Telegraph Co., and the watch-maker shop of B. M. Root, both suffering a total loss.


Fortunately there was but little wind during the conflagration, else the damage would have been more than doubled. As it was, houses several blocks away from the seat of the fire were ignited by flying cinders, and it was only by the closest surveillance that many other buildings were not added to the conflagration.


The Convent of Mercy, situated some distance from the scene, was on fire twice, but before gaining any headway, the flames were extinguished.


During the height of the fire, and until it was well under control, much excitement prevailed among residents in the neighborhood. Houses were emptied of their contents, and vehicles of all sorts were pressed in service to aid in conveying the goods to a place of safety. In many instances this was found to be unnecessary. Household goods were piled helter-skelter in every direction, and when daylight came, the scene presented cannot be described. The area of the fire covers the larger portion of four squares in the heart of the city and as the buildings destroyed were all of wood, there was little resistance to the flames.


[Partially illegible paragraph] paraphernalia, $500; insurance on opera-house, $1500.
Knights of Pythias, $1000; insurance, $600.
Geo. Ohr, Sr., $5000; no insurance.
John R. Harkness & Sons, $3000; no insurance.
Miss St. Tual, $700; insurance, $2000.
Geor E. Ohr, $3000; no insurance.
H. Eikel, $2800; insurance $1000.
J. Kilk, $400; no insurance.
Jos. Lawrence, $100; no insurance.
Mrs. Rich (2 houses), loss unknown.
Dan Markey, $250; no insurance.
Mechanics’ Steam Fire Co., $400; no insurance.
J. H. Murphy, $100; no insurance.
Felix Borries, $400, no insurance.
N. Voivedich, $700; no insurance.
F. W. Eaton, $00; no insurance.
J. Eistetter, $1000; no insurance.
B. M. Root, $400; no insurance.
P. Ferrar, $800; no insurance.


The insurance is divided among the following companies of E. W. Morrill’s agencies:
Royal $00; Harford, $6450; American Fire, $2345; Phoenix of London, $2275; Phenix of Brooklyn, $2550; Lancashire, $2000; Queen, $1500; Liverpool, London and Globe, $3500; Mechanics and Traders, $3200.


In but few instances was any portion of the contents of the burned buildings saved, and then only in a damaged condition. There is also considerable loss in the way of outhouses, stables, fences, etc.


The Electric Light Co. lose [sic] about $6000 in the destruction of poles wires, transformers, etc.


Many of those burned out will commence rebuilding at once. The loss is a severe one to our people, and to many is the loss of all their possessions. The business men who own property along Pass Christian st., to whom a Herald reporter has talked to on the subject signify their willingness to widen the street ten feet on either side than its present width.


The Herald building was threatened by flying cinders, and had it not been covered with abestos [sic], there is but little doubt that the roof would have ignited and it would have been almost impossible to have saved the building from destruction, and that or other and valuable property. Owners having property in the west end of town can thank their lucky stars that this office was covered by asbestos [sic], for had it burned the destruction would have been three fold greater than now recorded.


 

My great great grandfather John Rankin Harkness’s business is mentioned as destroyed in this article. Capt. John Rankin Harkness (1830-1903) was one of the founders of the Biloxi Fire Dept. He was born in Pelham, Hampshire, Massachusetts, the son of William Harkness and Abigail Turner.

Capt. John Rankin HARKNESS (1830 – 1903) — My 2nd great-grandfather

Edna Irene HARKNESS (1880 – 1952), daughter of Capt. John Rankin HARKNESS

John Harkness MORRIS (1901 – 1965), son of Edna Irene HARKNESS

Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013), daughter of John Harkness MORRIS

Me, the daughter of Janie Lucille MORRIS

 

 

The Grand Encampment and Grand Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of Mississippi Fifty-Seventh Annual Session, at Scranton, Mississippi, May 6, 1895

Posted on Updated on

1895-05-10 The Pascagoula Democrat Star

The Odd Fellows


Fifty-Seventh Annual Session,
AT SCRANTON, MISS., MAY 6, 1895


The Grand Encampment and Grand Lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of Mississippi, held their annual session in Scranton this week. The attendance upon each has been larger than for many years, and although the past year has been one of much financial depression, the reports of the Grand Officers, and statements of Individual members of the Grand Bodies, all indicate a healthy growth, several new lodges having been organized and some dormant ones revived.
The Grand Encampment met in its forty-third annual session on Monday morning at 10 o’clock, in the Odd Fellows Hall. The following Grand Officers being in their respective stations:


T. C. Billups, Columbus, Grand Patriarch.
Samuel French, Vicksburg, Grand High Priest.
F. W. Olin, Jackson Grand Senior Warden.
Jacob Fach, Summit, Grand Junior Warden.
Isaac D. Blumenthal, Holly Springs, Grand Scribe.
J. L. Power, Jackson, Acting Grand Treasurer.
W. B. Bradberry, Holly Springs, Grand Marshal.
H. C. Orman, Grenada, Grand Sentinel.


The Grand Patriarch, Grand Scribe, Grand Treasurer and Grand Representative made their reports.
The death of John H. McKenzie, Grand Treasurer, on April 25th, was announced, and a committee appointed to prepare a suitable tribute to that prominent and useful member of the order.


There were twelve Encampments represented, as follows:
Vicksburg, No. 2.—W. E. Blything, C. C. Kent.
Choctaw, No. 3.—A. Fichelman.
Tombigbee, No. 6.—J. L. Walker
Monroe, No. 9.—Phil. Chrisman.
Morning Star, No. 14.—S. R. Stewart.
Pontotoc, No. 17.—John Rowzee.
Theobold, No. 20.—J. W. Cunningham, J. D. Cleary.
Mt. Sinai, No. 21.—Geo. L. Gray.
Eureka, No. 22.—C. H. Garland.
Mamre, No. 28.—M. C. Oolgaardt.
Cyclone, No. 31.—H. M. Buckley.
Scranton, No. 32.—H. S. Rourke, S. H. Bugge, J. P. Fox.
At the night session the Grand Encampment was formally received by Scranton Encampment No. 32. The welcome address being delivered by Vincent Ros, and responded to by Wm. M. Strickland, of Holly Springs.
The following were elected Grand officers:
Samuel French, Vicksburg, Grand Patriarch.
F. W. Olin, Jackson, Grand High Priest.
W. B. Bradberry, Holly Springs, Grand Senior Warden.
Isaac D. Blumenthal, Holly Springs, Grand Scribe.
J. L. Power, Jackson, Grand Treasurer.
J. H. Rolls, Scranton, Grand Junior Warden.
H. C. Orman, Grenada, Grand Marshal.
H. M. Blything, Vicksburg, Grand Sentinel.

THE GRAND LODGE
The fifty-seventh annual session of the Grand Lodge met at 10 o’clock on Tuesday morning, the following Grand officers being in their respective stations:
Ellis T. Har, Grand Master.
C. L. Lincoln, Deputy Grand Master.
Simon Fried, Grand Warden.
Walter S. P. Doty, Grand Secretary.
J. L. Power, Acting Grand Treasurer.
W. J. Webb, Grand Chaplain.
William Jackson, Grand Marshall.
Theo. Baker. Grand Conductor.
Samuel French, Grand Guardian.
H. C. Nelson, Grand Herald.
Lodges were represented, as follows:
Mississippi, No. 1.—Wm. James.
Warren, No. 3.—F. A. Musgrove, J. W. Short.
Franklin, No. 5.—Geo. W. Acker.
Grenada, No. 6.—W. B. Barnes.
Macon, No.3.—F. C. Kent.
Wilkinson, No. 10.—Martin Rotschild.
Capitol, No. 11.—L. Schwartz, J. H. Taylor.
Jefferson, No. 14.—Jas. McClure
Stockman, No. 19.—W. B. Patty.
Wildy, No. 21.—O. L. McKay.
Ridgely, No. 23.—B. L. H. Wright.
Holly Springs, No. 30.—W. C. Tilton.
Union. No. 35.—T. B. Franklin.
Quitman, No. 36.—Jno. E. McClurg.
Okolona, No. 37.—Jno. D. Cleary.
Carrollton, No. 40.—C. C. Doty.
Pontontoc, No. 44.—H. C. Stanford.
Scranton, No. 45.—S. H. Bugge.
Central, No. 49.—T. P. Terry.
New Albany, No.73—W. A. Liddell.
Enterprise, No. 79.—Jas. McGee.
Meridian, No. 80.—J. P. Young, O. F. Temple.
Water Valley, No. 82.—J. S. Wilkes.
Star, No. 84.—Tal Hibbler.
Summit, No. 95.—J. R. Jewell.
Greenville, No. 94.—J. A. Newman.
Yazoo City, No. 102.—E. Schaefer.
Goodwille, No. 104.—H. L. Arnold.
Reliance, No. 107.—J. W. Sandell.
Charleston, No. 108.—Jas. McCorkle.
Copiah, No. 109.—J. Dampeer.
A. B. Longstreet, No. 113.—W. H. Baird.
L. Q. C. Lamar, No. 114.—W. B. Bailey.
Amory, No. 115.—R. P. Dilworth.
Jackson, No. 116.—Wm. Hemingway.
Moss Point, No. 117.—D. E. Morris.
Greenwood, No. 118.—M. Anderson.
Three Oaks, No. 121.—Jno. S. Davis.
Bay St. Louis, No. 122.—J. Heitzman.


Also, the following Past Grands, not representatives:
Leland Henderson, No. 22; J. P. Fox, C. L. Price, Jos. W. Allman, ___ Cunningham, No. 45; S. T. Holberg, No. 19; C. W. Garner, No. 117; N. S. Walker, No. 5.
The report of Grand Master, Grand Secretary, Grand Treasurer and Grand Representatives were submitted and referred to the appropriate committees.
Grand Secretary reported three new lodges and two revived during the year, and total membership to last December term 1,616.
The report of Grand Representatives. Sowed an addition of nearly thirty thousand members to the order during the past year, with a total membership of nearly one million in the jurisdiction of the Sovereign Grand Lodge. The benefits during 1895 amounting to about $3, 500, 000.
Aberdeen was selected as the place of next session, by unanimous vote. The lodge at that place will then celebrate its fiftieth anniversary.


The following were elected Grand officers:
C. L. Lincoln, Columbus, Grand Master.
Simon Fried, Starkville, Deputy Grand Master.
L. F. Chiles, Jackson, Grand Warden.
Walter S. P. Doty, Grenada, Grand Secretary.
J. L. Power, Jackson, Grand Treasurer.
Dr. A. D. Hutchinson, Columbus, Grand Representative.
Other officers to be appointed by the Grand Master elect.


A formal reception took place at the Courthouse at 5 o’clock, p.m., when Mayor Allman delivered the address of welcome, responded to by Past Grand Master Wiley N. Nash.
After a ride to Moss Point, and enjoying its hospitalities, the brethren returned to Scranton, where all the Coast Lodges united in a public reception in the Odd FellowsHll. Vincent Ros delivered the address of welcome, and Hon. M. M. Evans responded.
The secret work of the Order was then exemplified by Grand Representative Isaac D. Blumenthal.
The Grand Lodge, after a brief business session on Wednesday morning, entered upon the program arranged for the day—the excursion to Horn Island. A special train took the Grand Lodge and Grand Encampment, resident members of the Order and invited guests, to Moss Point, where they were joined by Moss Point Lodge and friends. The fleet for the excursion consisted of five steam tugs—Leo, Fox, Native Victor and Eva, two large barges and a schooner, and when these returned to Colle’s wharf, at Scranton, and took on the large party there waiting, the excursionists numbered fully one thousand. It was an afternoon of supreme pleasure to all. The committees of arrangements were indefatigable in their attention to their guests. The Escatawpa band discoursed excellent music, and if the young people had dancing space they certainly would have taken advantage of it.
On nearing the Island the “basket dinner” was spread on one of the barges, and there was not only an abundance for the party, but scores of baskets were not opened. And it was all of the very best, and never was a feast better served or more thoroughly enjoyed. The waiters included a Lieutenant-Governor, and many other gentlemen and ladies, who seemed to be expert in the business of feeding the hungry.
The Leo took quite a large party out into the Gulf, but none complained of sea-sickness. All got back in good time, and all expressed themselves delighted—one enthusiastic visitor from North Mississippi remarking, “this is a red-letter day in the history of our Order in Mississippi.”
The Grand Lodge re-assembled at 8 o’clock, and remained in session until 11 o’clock, when it finally adjourned. Many important reports were considered and adopted. The representatives made verbal reports as to the condition of their Lodges. A committee was appointed to prepare special resolutions of thanks for the innumerable courtesies of the sessions. The Grand Officers elect were duly installed, after which Past Grand Master J. L. Power made a brief address of congratulation and exhortation, and then the new Grand Master announced the appointive Grand Officers and standing committees, as follows:
Grand Marshal—Wm. James, Natchez.
Grand Conductor—W. B. Bradberry, Holly Springs.
Grand Herald—N. H. Bryant.
Grand Guardian—Samuel French.
The Grand Chaplain will be heretofore announced.
Judicial Committee—Isaac T. Hart, Percy Somerville, C. L. Tubb.
Finance Committee—O. L. Kimbrough, O. L. McKay, Jas. McClure.

THE ODD FELLOWS AT PASCAGOULA
An informal meeting of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of the village of Pascagoula was held at 11 o’clock a.m. Tuesday. Messrs. W. O. Clark, C. L. Johnson, H. F. Krebs and F. B. Walker were appointed a committee to tender the visiting Odd Fellows and their brethren a reception at Pascagoula, Captain G. H. Howze having tendered a free train on the Moss Point and Pascagoula railroad for that purpose. The invitation was extended and accepted at the evening session of the Grand Lodge, and the Odd Fellows arrived at Pascagoula at 6:15 p.m., when they were escorted to the “Cottage by the Sea” to partake of a sumptuous supper prepared for them in the spacious dining hall of that popular hostelry, Mayor Volney Brown, on behalf of the village, and Mr. H. F. Krebs made a few remarks of welcome, which were answered in a well delivered speech by Mr. C. L. Tubb, of Aberdeen.
Supper was proceeded with and the wants of the guests were attended to by the hostess, Mr. A. C. Bradford, assisted by Mrs. G. F. Southard, Mrs. E. D. Dean and Miss Addie Clark.

 

D. E. Morris in Moss Point Odd Fellows Lodge

Posted on Updated on

The Pascagoula Democrat-Star
May 04, 1894

Moss Point Secret Societies


Moss Point Lodge N. 117 I. O. F. [sic] meets every Monday night at K. of H. hall. D. E. Morris, N. G.; A. F. Dantzler, Secretary.


 

“I. O. O. F.” is an abbreviation of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. David Edmund “D. E.” Morris was my great grandfather and was best friends with the Dantzler family. – Note from TRose

Me and My Daddy Jim

Posted on Updated on

 

“Old as she was, she still missed her daddy sometimes.”

—Gloria Naylor



 

I was born a Bosworth, but, my parents divorced before my first birthday and I never knew my biological father until I graduated from high school. So, my “Daddy Jim Estrada” is the father I knew as my special angel when I was growing up on the Mississippi Gulf Coast as an Air Force brat. My Daddy Jim adopted me when he married my mother – I was just a little tiny girl about 2 1/2 years old. I remember so much about him. He was a wonderful daddy to me. Sadly, he was killed as a pilot flying in the USAF flying Strategic Air Command program when we were stationed at Bunker Hill Air Force Base in Indiana. I was just six when a terrible accident happened. He was flying in a B-58 (“Hustler”) bomber. One day I’ll write the story of my Daddy Jim. I am just as devastated today by his death as I was when I was told he was killed. It is a difficult thing to remember back to his death, but, it is a story worth telling as it colored my whole life and my perceptions of life in general. Little girls need their daddies.

67-daddy-jim-tenderly-59-2
Jim Estrada and Tenderly Rose
tenderly-and-jim-estrada
Not a very good photo of a photo – but, it is priceless to me. This is Daddy Jim and me at the Biloxi Amusement Park.
tenderly-daddy-jim-2
When we were stationed at the Air Force Base in Altus, Oklahoma we went on a picnic after my baby “tister” was born. This is me and Daddy Jim and my “Lambie”.

daddy-jim-estrada-and-tenderly-1959-altus-oklahoma

Daddy Jim Estrada and Tenderly 1959 when we were stationed at the Air Force base in Altus, Oklahoma.

me-jim-and-angie
Visiting Mamaw (Rosie S. Morris) at Easter Time. At this time we were living in Oklahoma, but, always visited Mamaw whenever we could. – In this photo: Me, Daddy Jim and my sister at Hungry Hill on Wisteria Street in Gulfport, Mississippi.