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The Little Boy and the Old Man

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Jane May (Hoagland) Bailey (1881 – 1986): Possunt quia posse videntur

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The Press Democrat

Santa Rosa, California

December 20, 1981

Page 21

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20th Century woman still one who can

By Celia Ersland

***

Jane Bailey’s motto in high school was “Possunt quia posse videntur.” Loosely translated, it  means, “He who thinks he can.”

Recently, Mrs. Bailey, a resident of Martin’s Retirement Home, 3357 Hoen Ave., rounded out a century of her life. Two parties were given for the centenarian – one for her friends of the retirement home and another at the home of her daughter, Betty Schreiber of Oakmont.

The party at her daughter’s home was attended by Mrs. Bailey’s grandchildren and great grandchildren, and for this occasion, she wrote a history of her life and of her family. She was assisted by Mrs. Schreiber.

“My high school motto has proven true many times in my life for when you live in a mining camp there are many challenges. I once remember sewing up a deep gash in a miner’s hand with an ordinary needle and thread to stop the bleeding. The hard rock miner who was holding the victim’s hand for me fainted!”

Mrs. Bailey who is alert and uses only her walker when she moves about, adds, “Our graduating class was called ‘The Twentieth Century Class’ as we were the first class to graduate in Elgin (Illinois) in this century. One of the highlights of my life was playing Hermes, the lead in our class play, ‘Midsummer Night’s Dream.’” It played two nights at the Elgin Opera House and we were directed by an actor from Chicago.”

“I must not have been as great as I thought I was, for I tried out for an elocution scholarship to the University of Chicago and lost. I did win a scholarship to the University of Illinois in home economics. My father didn’t believe that girls needed a college education, but he finally let me go. So in the fall of 1902, he took me by train to Urbana, Ill. I joined Chi Omega Sorority and had a wonderful time.”

Mrs. Bailey, who has four grandchildren and eight great grandchildren, was born in Elgin on Nov. 14, 1881. Her father Samuel Hoagland had a livery stable with “matched teams and equipment for all occasions – wedding, funeral, holidays … he finally owned the Yellow Cab Taxi Co. there.”

Her mother, Maria Blow Hoagland was “only five feet tall and always full of fun.” Her grandmother, Lucy Flude Knott, came from Leicester, England at the age of 20. She and her husband, Mrs. Bailey’s grandfather, who sailed aboard a sailing vessel to America in 1848, had 10 children and lived in Dundee, Ill. Grandmother Blow advised Mrs. Bailey when she was married “not to have such a large family as she always had one baby on her lap and one under her apron.”

Grandmother Hoagland was born Celia Sears and was related to the Sear, Roebuck & Founders. Grandmother Blow had Roebuck relatives.

One of Mrs. Bailey’s “happiest childhood memories is of riding over the snow to Thanksgiving and Christmas celebrations in Dundee with the sleigh bells ringing.”

Another recollection involved her freshman year at the University of Illinois in 1902. “At my first dance I met a tall handsome Sig Alph who asked me for a dance and put his name on my dance card – and then stood me up.”

“He must have had a good alibi, as we later became engaged and were married June 5, 1906, just before Tom Bailey graduated with a bachelor of science degree in chemistry. I didn’t graduate as after two years in school we had become engaged and my father didn’t see any reason for me to continue my education.

The Bailey’s had been bitten by the mining bug and we took a job as assayer with a mining company in Silverton, Colo.

Mrs. Bailey remembers the trip to the west in 9105. Indians stood around “wrapped in blankets at the train station and she was frightened a bit by the narrow gauge railroad they rode in the Colorado mountains.

“Silverton was a rough mining town in 1905…We took up residence in a rooming house.” Later they found a furnished home and eventually had their first daughter, Mary Elizabeth. But she lived only a few days. Two years later the couple moved to Wallstreet, another Colorado mining town.

Their children, Thomas, Dorothy and Betty, were born there.

“Wallstreet was about nine miles from Boulder,” Mrs. Bailey recalls, “but it took about a half a day to make the trip by horse and buggy – lots of resting the horse, as it was a steep road. Then we moved to Boulder where Tom opened a custom assay office and Bob was born.”

During World War I and II, the Baileys were involved in volunteer work. After World War I, he sold the assay office and took up metallurgy full time. During World War II, Tom Bailey went to work for the Bureau of Mines in Washington, D. C.

Later they moved to Oxford, N. C., for a few years and eventually back to Colorado. Tom Bailey died in 1965, after almost 60 years of marriage. Mrs. Bailey lived in Colorado until three years ago, when she came to Santa Rosa to be near her one remaining child, Betty Schreiber, and Mrs. Schreiber’s husband and children.

She attributes her century of life to her forebearers.

“They say if you want to live to a ripe old age, you should choose your ancestors for longevity. My grandfather Blow lived within 10 days of his 99th birthday, and four of his children lived into their late 90s – my mother lived the longest: 99 and four months.”

She adds, “Grandfather Blow smoked a pipe most of his life – a fact which some would say should have shortened his life. When he was 95, Prince Albert Smoking Tobacco used his picture in their ad.”

Mrs. Bailey, however, has never smoked and has never fancied alcoholic beverages.

If you ask her what vices she does have, she laughs and says with a twinkle in her eye. “Oh. I’ve had many!”

Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Getting ready for her 100th birthday party
Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Centenarian needs only a walker to get around
Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Life has taught Jane Bailey-He who thinks he can
Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Mrs Bailey watches her daughter Betty Schreiber cut her birthday cake

 


 

Relationship between Jennie “Jane” May Hoagland & Robin Melissa BOSWORTH:

Jennie “Jane” May Hoagland (1881 – 1986)
2nd great-aunt

***

Maria Elizabeth BLOW (1854 – 1953)
Mother of Jennie “Jane” May Hoagland
Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND (1880 – 1961)
Son of Maria Elizabeth BLOW
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
Daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
Son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa BOSWORTH
The daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH

Two GHS Girls Participate In Jr. Miss

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The Helm-GHS 1974
Gulfport High School’s “The Helm” 1974

The Helm

Gulfport High School – Gulfport, Mississippi

January 1974

*****

TWO GHS GIRLS PARTICIPATE IN JR. MISS

Linda Broadus and Violet Clark were the two participants in the 1973 Junior Miss Pageant from GHS. Each of the girls were awarded a silver plate with their initials on it for their participation.

The Junior Miss Pageant is held every year to determine a representative to the State Junior Miss Pageant. The girls participating must be seniors in high school and must fill out applications regarding their age, grades, and personality. They are required to show some form of talent and to present a dance routine. A tea and a judge’s conference is scheduled later for the girls to attend. The winner is partially determined by the number of points she gets for attending the scheduled events and for their performances.

 


 

Violet Clark and I were best friends all throughout our school days. When Gulfport High School did not have a prom due to “integration issues”, she invited me to be her date at the prom the African Americans were planning. I was disappointed my mother made other plans for me for that date. I know Violet and I would have had a blast! I’ll never forget our friendship and keep her in my heart.

Submitted by Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa Bosworth Estrada Reininger

Mamaw’s Sweetheart Soap Crocheted Turtles

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Just A Little Turtle Poem

A Sweetheart Soap Crocheted Turtle made by Rosie Smith Morris, R.N. of Gulfport
A “Sweetheart Soap Crocheted Turtle” made by Mrs. Rosie Smith Morris, R.N. of Gulfport, Mississippi. She sold hundreds of these little turtles in the gift shop of Gulfport Memorial Hospital for years and years during the 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s. She had a little card printed with the little poem on it that accompanied the turtles.

The turtle in the photo above is one of the turtles I was given by my grandmother, Mrs. Rosie Smith Morris, R.N. I still remember that little poem, memorized by heart. It is a great way to teach children how to bathe themselves. This turtle is in use today even after 45 years in my possession. Sweetheart Soap is hard to come by these days, so I have filled mine with special scented soap. Great to stick in lingerie drawers as a sachet, too!

 

Irma Francis Dupre – Author and Historian – Passes Away in 1980

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Cardunal Free Press

Wednesday, April 16, 1980

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Local historian dies

Irma F. Dupre, author, historian, reporter and editor, passed away Saturday, April 5, 1980, in the Elgin Mental Health Center.

Miss Dupre, 89, formerly of 129 S. Second St., West Dundee, spent much of her illustrious life with the written word. She wrote the book, “The Romance of Dundee Township,” for the township’s centennial celebration. For many years, until the close of her writing career, she wrote the column, “Suburbiana” for the Cardunal Free Press. She had also worked for the Evanston newspaper, and the defunct Dundee Review. At one time she reported the news over the radio.

Miss Dupre contributed to the written history of St. James Episcopal Church of Dundee in the 1964 Parish Centennial Booklet. She wrote many press releases for various organizations, and at one time for the Dundee Township Public Library and the Dundee Township Historical Society.

She was born Oct. 10, 1890, in Dundee, the daughter of Peter F. and Lucy Blow Dupre and had lived in the Dundee area most of her life.

She was a member of the St. James Episcopal Church of Dundee and a former member of the Zonta Club and the Dundee Historical Society.

There are no immediate survivors.

She was preceded in death by her parents and a brother Rae.

Memorial services will be held today, Wednesday, at 2 p.m. in St. James Episcopal Church of Dundee, the Rev. Chester Boynton officiating.

There will be no visitation.

Cremation was in Elmlawn Crematory, Elmhurst.

Sharp-Schmidt Funeral Home, West Dundee was in charge of arrangements.

Memorials may be made in her memory to the Dundee Township Historical Society.

 


 

Lucy Flude Blow (1857 – )
Mother of Irma Frances Dupre
Father, Peter Stephen Dupre
Charles BLOW (1820 – 1919)
Father of Lucy Flude Blow
Maria Elizabeth BLOW (1854 – 1953)
Daughter of Charles BLOW
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
Daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
Son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa BOSWORTH – Me
the daughter of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH

Seventy-First Graduation Exercises Planned

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The Helm-GHS 1974
Gulfport High School’s “The Helm” 1974

The Helm

Gulfport High School – Gulfport, Mississippi

June 1974

*****

Seventy-First Graduation Exercises Planned

The seventy-first annual GHS graduation exercises will be held at the B. Frank Brown Gymnasium at 8:00 p.m. Friday, May 31. For the 1974 seniors, graduation represents a giant step in their lives.

An invocation by Mr. Harry Tartt will precede the presentation of special awards by Mr. W. L. Rigby, Superintendent of Gulfport City Schools.

Then two seniors that have been selected by competitive competition will give orations designed as commentaries and challenges to the graduating class.

Mr. Martin J. Gendron, Principal, will present the graduation class after which a member of the Board of Education will award the diplomas.

The recessional will be played by the Commodore band under the direction of Mr. Blain Curry.

PRACTICES:

Mr. Gendron would like to remind seniors that attendance at the two graduation rehearsals should be prompt. Those graduating should be at the gymnasium on May 28 and May 30, the seniors will practice in their caps and gowns, after which time their class picture will be taken.

SENIOR AWARDS DAY:

Wednesday, May 15, the annual Senior Awards Day was held in the auditorium honoring seniors who had achieved special recognition in scholarship and leadership.

Dennis Miller, president of the senior class, presented the class gift to the school. Then Mr. Rigby presented the awards to the graduation class.

Under the direction of Mr. Chris Lewis, the GHS choir sang a special selection and led the seniors in Gulfport High’s Alma Mater.

Officers of the Class of 1974 are: Dennis Miller, president; Sammy Cucurullo, vice-president; Robin Richardson, treasurer, and Pam McLendon, secretary.

— Donna Pearce

 

Dundee Pioneer Charles Blow A Hero at 94 Years Old

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Mr and Mrs Charles Blow of Dundee - 63rd Wedding Anniv
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Blow of Dundee, Illinois

 

The Rock Island Argus

July 18, 1913

Page 9

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HUSBAND, 94, SAVES WIFE FROM FLAMES

Stairway Crashes as Aged Man Bears Helpmate Away from Burning House.

***

Muscatine, Iowa, July 18

Heroism which parallels that of genuine fiction was exhibited by Charles Blow, 94 years old, from possible death in a fire which totally destroyed the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Contriman at Fruitland yesterday.

The aged people were in the home alone at the time of the fire. They have been guests at the Contriman home for the past several weeks, coming here from their home at Elgin, Ill. Their daughter, Mrs. Contriman was out in the pasture while Mr. Contriman was in the field.

The fire was discovered by Mr. Blow just as he had descended to the kitchen preparatory toward securing his breakfast. Considerable headway has already been made by the fire, a gust of flame enveloping him as he opened the kitchen door. Staggering from the noxious fumes he pluckily made his way upstairs where his wife was dressing. The aged woman was almost prostrated by the smoke which filled the upstairs portion of the dwelling and her husband practically carried her down the flight of the stairs. The passageway was dense with smoke and the two old people were compelled to fight their way to safety blindly. Flames singed the hair of both although neither was otherwise injured.

Barely a minute after they reached fresh air, the stairway crashed in.

The home was burned to the ground in its entirety. Nothing was saved. The loss to the furniture is estimated at about $1,500, while to the dwelling about $1,2000. The house was owned by Theodore Drake, a well known Muscatine Island resident. But a small amount of insurance was carried. The dwelling had recently been remodeled but since the improvements the insurance had not been increased.

Mr. and Mrs. Contriman had made their home in Fruitland since last February coming here from Chicago.


Charles BLOW (1820 – 1919)
My 3rd great-grandfather
 
Maria Elizabeth BLOW (1854 – 1953)
daughter of Charles BLOW
 
 
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
 
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
 
Robin Melissa BOSWORTH
Me, the daughter of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH

Mr. Charles Blow and his wife, Lucy Flude Knott, are my 3x great grandparents.

 


 

Submitted by Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa Bosworth Reininger