Gulfport MS

Pleasant Surprise Party

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PS_JanetScott_PondLife_Flowers

Biloxi Daily Herald November 14, 1923

PLEASANT SURPRISE PARTY

A pleasant surprise party and miscellaneous shower was held at the handsome new bungalow of Misses Stella and Mae Harkness, on West Howard avenue, Monday night in which a number of their relatives and members of the Biloxi post office force participated. The event was given in honor of the birthday of Miss Stella Harkness, who has charge of the general delivery window of the local postoffice. The guests gathered at a designated point and marched to the Harkness bungalow where they were delightfully entertained. The guests with a huge birthday cake all lighted with candles entered the home, and were received by Miss Harkness with considerable surprise. During the several pleasant hours delicious hot chocolate and cake were served. Pleasing recitations were given by the Misses Irene and Martha Morris of Gulfport, who also presided at the piano. Many handsome and useful gifts were showered upon the honoree. Among the guests present included Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Harkness, Giles Harkness Peresich, Mrs. Walter G. Wilkes and daughter. Miss Laurie, Mrs. J. W. Swetman, Dr. and Mrs. B. Z. Welch, Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Thompson, Mrs. D. E. Morris and daughters, Misses Irene and Martha Morris, and son John Harkness Morris, of Gulfport, Misses Sadie, Harriet, Stella and Mae Harkness, Mamie Hannon and Messrs. J. R. Munier, J. C. Brent and Addison Jackson.

D.E. Morris Purchases 40 Lumber Railroad Cars for Dantzler Mills

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1912-10-14 Daily Herald – Gulfport, Mississippi

40 CARS FOR DANTZLER MILLS

D.E. Morris Purchases Cars to Be Used In Moving Lumber of Big Company’s Mills

Gulfport, October 14

D.E. Morris, manager of the Dantzler Foundry, returned last night from Chicago, where he went to buy 40 lumber cars for the Dantzler Mills. The deal for these cars was practically closed, but it is not known when they will come forward. “The big truck line railroads,” says Mr. Morris, “are getting freight cars to relieve the congestion of freights along their lines. In the pursuance of this practice they will get cars which are billed to the roads owning and operating them, and convert them to their own use. Not in the history of railroading in the west has there been such a wild scramble for cars with which to move the grain crop to the exporting centers. The movement of the cotton crop also is creating an additional demand for cars.”

 


 

David Edmund “D.E.” MORRIS (1866 – 1934)
(My great-grandfather)
John Harkness MORRIS (1901 – 1965)
son of David Edmund “D.E.” MORRIS
Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013)
daughter of John Harkness MORRIS
Me-the daughter of Janie Lucille MORRIS

1907 Easter Services at Main Street Church in Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi

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Easter 30 Mar 1907 Stella and May Harkness-Biloxi MS
1907 Easter Services at Main Street Church-Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi

Stella and May Harkness were my 2nd great aunts, sisters of my great great grandmother Edna Irene Harkness. They were daughters of John Rankin Harkness, Biloxi architect and engineer.

Me and My Daddy Jim

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“Old as she was, she still missed her daddy sometimes.”

—Gloria Naylor



 

I was born a Bosworth, but, my parents divorced before my first birthday and I never knew my biological father until I graduated from high school. So, my “Daddy Jim Estrada” is the father I knew as my special angel when I was growing up on the Mississippi Gulf Coast as an Air Force brat. My Daddy Jim adopted me when he married my mother – I was just a little tiny girl about 2 1/2 years old. I remember so much about him. He was a wonderful daddy to me. Sadly, he was killed as a pilot flying in the USAF flying Strategic Air Command program when we were stationed at Bunker Hill Air Force Base in Indiana. I was just six when a terrible accident happened. He was flying in a B-58 (“Hustler”) bomber. One day I’ll write the story of my Daddy Jim. I am just as devastated today by his death as I was when I was told he was killed. It is a difficult thing to remember back to his death, but, it is a story worth telling as it colored my whole life and my perceptions of life in general. Little girls need their daddies.

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Jim Estrada and Tenderly Rose
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Not a very good photo of a photo – but, it is priceless to me. This is Daddy Jim and me at the Biloxi Amusement Park.
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When we were stationed at the Air Force Base in Altus, Oklahoma we went on a picnic after my baby “tister” was born. This is me and Daddy Jim and my “Lambie”.

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Daddy Jim Estrada and Tenderly 1959 when we were stationed at the Air Force base in Altus, Oklahoma.

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Visiting Mamaw (Rosie S. Morris) at Easter Time. At this time we were living in Oklahoma, but, always visited Mamaw whenever we could. – In this photo: Me, Daddy Jim and my sister at Hungry Hill on Wisteria Street in Gulfport, Mississippi.