Frank Hunt Bosworth 1933-____

Fred Judson Hoagland by Grandson Frank H. Bosworth

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Fred Judson Hoagland
by 

Grandson Frank H. Bosworth – 1985


I became first truly aware of my grandfather as a real person, when he was able to spend time with me after our 1947 Kankakee, Illinois auto accident. I’ll always remember his looking to be about 7 feet tall at my hospital bedside, standing next to my Uncle Bob Mogler. He lit a cigar and offered one to me before he thought of my age (14), looked piercingly at me, and asked if I smoked. I stated that I did not and his penetrating eyes that were kindly but seemed to see through me, he chuckled and smiled and said, “You’d better not!” He really loved my mom, my brother, and me. He later came to the Gulf Coast, Biloxi, to see us with his dogs “Taxi” and “Chevy”-a matching pair of beautiful boxers.

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John Mosiman 1931-2012

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John Mosiman bore a strong family resemblance to both of his biological parents and brothers.

John Mosiman

1931–2012

 John Mosiman was an uncle I never met and did not know much of anything about until I began my family history research. It broke my heart to know I had an uncle I never knew and cousins I never knew living in Texas. I had no other cousins or uncles on my father’s side of the family tree. I reached out to John Mosiman in the final years of his life, when I finally located him. I thought my father would be overjoyed to be in touch with John as he had mentioned him in a kind a loving way. I thought John would be happy to connect with my father, but, I think maybe my reaching out to him via e-mail was a great shock to him. I’ve saved those e-mails. They mean the world to me, however, frankly, I desperately wanted to meet him and his family. That was never to be.

I gave my father John’s contact information and I gave John my father’s contact information urging them to reach out to each other. I felt certain they would because of their strong religious faith and dedication to family. I was concerned that due to their age, one would pass and they would never have the opportunity to meet. And that is just what happened. It just hurt my heart so much. I had felt my Grandmother Helen holding my hand as I did this work of reunification of the two brothers. A few years have passed and I still hurt to have had this experience. I have learned you can’t fix some things, especially when it comes to broken family relations. I have let go and let God…

 
My father had noted in his family history notes he had a brother that was placed for adoption at birth. My mother had told me that my father had had a brother born before him in Chicago when my grandfather, Wilder Morris Bosworth, was in dental school. She told me my grandfather made my Grandmother Helen give him up for adoption. This is still a bit of a mystery to me because my father was born a year later and they raised him and another brother after this adoption took place.
 
I have a copy of a news article my grandmother kept with her family history research and collection of genealogy notes that my father came into possession of after my Grandmother Helen passed away. My father went through her things and saved what he felt was important. This article was included when my father wrote his version of the family history. His version of the family history was a work of opinion in several cases. 


John Mosiman (1931 – 2012)
uncle
 
Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
father of John Mosiman
(Adoptive parents: Fred and Lucille Mosiman of Elgin, Illinois)
 
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.
 
Me
the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

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This is the photo of John Mosiman from an article my Grandmother Helen had kept in her keepsakes until she passed away.

 


 

 

Mosiman-John The Daily Herald-Chicago IL USA 1974 December 27 Photo
The Daily Herald-Chicago Illinois 1974 January 27  “John Mosiman: his painting comes from the heart”

 

The Daily Herald-Chicago Illinois 1974 January 27

John Mosiman: his painting comes from the heart

By Eleanor Rives

One spectator called it “ballet on a palette.”

John Mosiman, Elgin artist who has made thousands of appearances before clubs, schools, conventions, banquets and churches, entitles it “Musical Paintings.”

More than music, more than art, Mosiman’s program holds an audience enthralled. At his recent appearance at the Des Plaines Ladies of Elks Christmas dinner, one could hear a pin drop.

He dramatically combines stereophonic music, “painting” with colored chalks and theatrical lighting units that he manipulates to produce various moods in an almost dreamlike sequence.

His movements coincide with the rhythms and interpretations of such orchestral sound tracks as “Carmen”

His Scenes are realistic 00 the vastness and grandeur of America’s West; landscapes from Venice, Ecuador, Spain; a Midwestern farm scene; vistas of natural beauty he has encountered in his travels from coast to coast and in seven foreign countries.

Let’s look in on Mosiman’s Christmas program.

“I have my orchestra with me tonight in there two boxes,” Mosiman chats with the audience, with modest reference to his new stereophonic speakers, part of the 200 pounds of equipment – easel, sound system and theatrical lighting units – he brings with him.

The only illumination in the room falls on the large canvas in the gold frame.

Matching his strokes and pace to the music, the lefthanded artist proceeds to depict the manger scene on a background already aswirl with muted color. Mosiman matches mood for mood, slashing in bold, dramatic lines to the beat, excitement building as the music crescendos. The finished scene is viewed in quiet awe through a succession of lighting effects – now dim, now fiery, now fluorescent – to a musical background of “What Child is This?”

And so it is with the Wise Men following a star, then with the shepherds tending their flocks in the fields, ending with the stirring music of Handel’s “Messiah.”

House lights go up, the audience returns to reality to pop questions at Mosiman, who explainds the ‘more mundane aspects of how to use the vinyl-backed canvas over and over, how to make one’s own chalk, how the lights are operated.

“Making chalk is easier than making a cake…all except black, I buy that,” he says.

Back in 1952, John Mosiman, a student at Wheaton College, was drawing I the black ghettos on the south side of Chicago. Then, with art degree tucked under his arm, he took off for Ecuador to work with a missionary radio station.

“I was doing missionary work in a specialized way,” he said. He was sent by the mission to give art programs in Peru, Bolivia, Colombia, Panama, Costa Rico. He presented them to a background of classical music.

Gradually he began moving with the music. When the mission got late television, John was responsible for all the art work, the title cards, the backdrops and a program of his own.

When he saw his own program on TV, he realized he was not identifying with the music nearly as much as he supposed. “From that time on I just let go,” he said. “I really threw myself into it.

Mosiman met his wife, a nurse with the mission, at language school in Costa Rica where he was studying Spanish. They married, lived 10 years in Quito, Ecuador, then moved back to the states with their three children, settling in Algonquin (later in Elgin).

At that time, Johns life was at crossroads, with three possible directions. He was a partner and craftsman in a small printing shop; he had returned to school, Northern Illinois University, to work on his master’s degree; he could continue performing. Which route to go?

“I really liked performing best,” he said.

H attained his master’s degree, ended his print shop affiliation and began performing again. In the next few years his programs mushroomed from none to 250 a year.

Since then he has performed in San Francisco, Las Vegas, Dallas, Miami, New York and host of other places including numerous engagements in the northwest suburbs. He has appeared before approximately 200 organizations this past year, 25 of them schools. For the convenience of club program chairmen, he is listed in Paddock Publications Program Directory. He may be reached at 805-7341.

His programs vary from 15 to 75 minutes. Some are light and gay, some serious and sedate. All involve weeks of preparation designing color sketches, lighting sequences, musical sound tracks, scripts and choreography. But more than this makes John Mosiman’s performance exhilarating.

He summed it simply. “I feel the pictures. They come from inside.”

 


 

In Memory of  John Mosiman

September 12, 1931 – December 26, 2012

Obituary

John Mosiman, devoted husband, father, and grandfather went to be with his Lord on December 26, 2012.

John was the adopted son of Fred and Lucille Mosiman of Elgin, Illinois. He leaves a legacy of faith and love to his wife of 57 years, Gloria.

John is survived by his sister Sue Wyld of Wheaton, Illinois; three adult children, his daughter Elizabeth Adkins of Summerville, South Carolina; his daughter Marianne and her husband John Sullivan of Austin, Texas; his son John Douglas Mosiman and his wife Ajeli of Fort Mill, South Carolina; and five grandchildren.

John graduated from Wheaton College in 1953 and later earned his Master of Art degree in art at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, Illinois.

John and Gloria met in San José, Costa Rica. They studied Spanish prior to mission work in Ecuador South America. They were married in Quito, Ecuador where they served as missionaries for twelve years.

John created an art form he called “Musical Paintings.” It was a blend of chalk paintings with theatrical lighting and choreographed to music, captivating audiences at clubs, conventions, churches and schools. He performed from New York to Dallas, Miami to San Francisco, also to Canada and seven countries in Latin America crossing a span of forty-one years.

John was an accomplished artist and created pencil drawings and acrylic paintings. He enjoyed hiking and camping in the wilderness. During his career he climbed forty-seven peaks in the Rocky Mountains. He was well-known for sleeping under the stars in his hammock instead of a tent. He greatly enjoyed carving intricate designs and Bible verses on walking sticks.

John opted to spend his retirement years ministering in Ciudad Acuña, Mexico. A major part of his work was building houses for destitute families, enabling them to move out of their cardboard shacks and into frame houses. He recruited and spearheaded volunteer construction teams, supervising them and working with his own hands as well. They constructed over one hundred fifty houses. John gather financial donation of over one million dollars.

John sponsored hundreds of Mexican youths for high school and university education. Through his life, God radically changed the life of many people; both those in need and those who came to help.

John completed his work in Mexico in 2010 when his illness prevented him from travelling. Since that time, being confined at home, he enjoyed teaching the Bible to small groups at his home and mentoring several individuals.

John will be missed by his family and friends worldwide. John often mentioned this Bible verse: “There is nothing in us that allows us to claim that we are capable of doing this work. The capacity we have comes from God. It is he who made us capable of serving…” – 2 Corinthians 3.5, 6 TEV.

A memorial service celebrating John’s life will be held at 2:00 P.M. on Saturday, January 5, 2013 at Hillcrest Baptist Church, 3838 Steck Ave, Austin, Texas. 78759.

In lieu of flowers, John has requested donations be made out to His Work, Inc., 13217 Dime Box Trl. Austin, TX 78729, with a memo designating the check for Acuña Mexico Ministry, Building and or Education. Website: http://hisworkinc.org or for aiding persecuted Christians around the world, send donations to the Voice of Martyrs, PO Box 443, Bartlesville, OK 74005-0443, phone 800-747-0085, memo John Mosiman memorial.

Condolences may be made at www.cookwaldenchapelofthehills.com

http://obits.dignitymemorial.com/dignity-memorial/obituary.aspx?n=John-Mosiman&lc=4885&pid=161990150&mid=5357326#

 


 

I still have deep sadness when I think of my Grandmother Helen’s tremendous sacrifice of having to place her son for adoption. I have sadness that there was a family I never knew and whom I would have loved with all my heart. It is just a heartbreaking story that haunts me. While I am grateful and appreciative I was able to find out who my uncle was and how he spent his life, I just wish I could have helped those two brothers to unite. 


Here are some bits of information I gleaned from my research:

 

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John Mosiman at Wheaton College
Florida, Passenger Lists 1898-1963 for John Mosiman
Florida, Passenger Lists 1898-1963 for John Mosiman

 

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Two Pumps by John Mosiman 8×16 inch serigraph
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Grand Canyon by John Mosiman, 6×8 serigraph
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Signed JOHN MOSIMAN ” Door County Barn ” Original Serigraph
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John Mosiman Serigraph Numbered Misty Autumn Morning LE 69/225 Woods Cabin 13×10

 

The Daily Herald-Chicago IL USA 1
John Mosiman “Musical Painter” – The Daily Herald/Chicago Illinois 1971 January 21

 

http://sacredartpilgrim.com/collection/view/86

https://reachbeyond.org/content/news/read/compassion-and-brush-strokes-of-artist-brightened-lives-of-others-1

http://www.graceofgiving.org/Newsletters/Newsletter%20April%202005.pdf

 

So many of John Mosiman’s works of art are available to view just by Googling his name. I especially love the barn and Wisconsin scenes, of course. My style of painting is much like his. 

I just wish I could have met him. I wish my father and grandmother could have known him. At least I feel I kind of know him.

 

 

 

Capt. Increase Graham Child 1740–1810

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Capt. Increase Graham Child

1740–1810

 5th Great Grandfather

Olive Pease CHILD (1775 – 1847)
daughter of Increase Graham CHILD
Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D. (1801 – 1843)
son of Olive Pease CHILD
Franklin Smith BOSWORTH (1832 – 1919)
son of Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D.
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1870 – 1919)
son of Franklin Smith BOSWORTH
Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
son of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.
Me
the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

When Increase Graham CHILD was born on December 13, 1740, in Woodstock, Connecticut, his father, Dr. Ephraim, was 29 and his mother, Mary, was 28. He married Olive PEASE on November 3, 1762, in Milton, New York. They had eight children in 17 years. He died on June 10, 1810, in Greenfield, New York, at the age of 69, and was buried in Saratoga County, New York.

Source Citation – Connecticut Soldiers, French and Indian War, 1755-62:

Given Name Increase
Surname Child
Page # 242
Company Carpenter’s
Co.Command Carpenter, John Capt.
Comments Muster Roll of Company of late recruits of Aug.1757.

Connecticut Soldiers, French and Indian War, 1755-62:

Given Name Increase
Surname Child
Page # 63
Location Connecticut
Regiment Third
Regt.Command Fitch, Eleazer Colonel & Captain
Company Sixth
Co.Command Holmes, David Captain
Campaign Year 1758
Source List Muster Roll

Connecticut Soldiers, French and Indian War, 1755-62:

Given Name Increase
Surname Child
Page # 168
Location Connecticut
Regiment Fourth
Regt.Command Fitch, Eleazer Colonel & Captain
Company Seventh
Co.Command Holmes, David Captain
Campaign Year 1759
Source List Muster Roll

Increase Graham Child fought against the British during the Revolutionary War.
Capture
Increase Graham Child – Source Citation for Index of the Rolls of Honor (Ancestor’s Index) in the Lineage Books of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Vol. I

Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots:

Name Increase Capt Child
Cemetery North Milton Cem
Location Milton, Saratoga Co NY 41
Increase Child-Salmon Child Fold3_Page_17_Revolutionary_War_Pension_and_BountyLand_Warrant_Application_Files
Increase Child and Salmon Child Fold3_Page_17_Revolutionary_War_Pension_and_BountyLand_Warrant_Application_Files
Capt. Childs Fold3_Page_1_Compiled_Service_Records_of_Soldiers_Who_Served_in_the_American_Army_During_the_Revolutionary_War (1)
Capt. Childs Fold3_Page_1_Compiled_Service_Records_of_Soldiers_Who_Served_in_the_American_Army_During_the_Revolutionary_War (1)

 

Increase Childs Fold3_Page_1_Compiled_Service_Records_of_Soldiers_Who_Served_in_the_American_Army_During_the_Revolutionary_War
Increase Childs Fold3_Page_1_Compiled_Service_Records_of_Soldiers_Who_Served_in_the_American_Army_During_the_Revolutionary_War
Increase Child Fold3_Page_18_Revolutionary_War_Rolls_17751783
Increase Child Fold3_Page_18_Revolutionary_War_Rolls_17751783

Richard Warren 1579–1628: Mayflower Passenger

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Richard Warren

Unknown Birthdate – 1628

Unknown Birth Place

Death 20 October 1628 Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA

my 10th great-grandfather – Bosworth Line

Mayflower Passenger


 

Elizabeth WARREN (1617 – 1670)
daughter of Richard WARREN
 
Benjamin CHURCH (1637 – 1717)
son of Elizabeth WARREN
 
Charles CHURCH (1682 – 1746)
son of Benjamin CHURCH
 
Constant CHURCH (1708 – 1740)
son of Charles CHURCH
 
Mary Reynolds CHURCH (1741 – 1781)
daughter of Constant CHURCH
 
Alfred BOSWORTH (1773 – 1861)
son of Mary Reynolds CHURCH
 
Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D. (1801 – 1843)
son of Alfred BOSWORTH
 
Franklin Smith BOSWORTH (1832 – 1919)
son of Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D.
 
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1870 – 1919)
son of Franklin Smith BOSWORTH
 
Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
son of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH
 
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.
Me
the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

Richard & Elizabeth Warren

Richard Warren was a passenger on the Mayflower, arriving in Plymouth in 1620. We know he was from London and the evidence seems to indicate that he was a man of some wealth.

His wife, Elizabeth, arrived in Plymouth on the Anne in 1623 with the couples’ daughters Abigail, Anna, Elizabeth, Mary and Sarah. Two sons, Nathaniel and Joseph, were born to the Warrens in Plymouth.

Richard Warren died in 1628. His wife Elizabeth outlived him by 45 years, dying at Plymouth in 1673. Her death was noted in the Records of Plymouth Colony (PCR 8:35) : “Mistris Elizabeth Warren, an aged widdow, aged above 90 yeares, deceased on the second of October, 1673, whoe, haveing lived a godly life, came to her grave as a shocke of corn fully ripe.”

During the long period of her widowhood, Elizabeth Warren’s name appears in the records of Plymouth Colony. She appears first as executor of her husband’s estate, next paying taxes owed by a head of household, and finally as an independent agent in her own right.

An article by Edward J. Davies in the April 2003 issue of The American Genealogist gives evidence that Elizabeth Warren may have been the daughter of Augustine Walker.   An Elizabeth Walker, daughter of Augustine Walker, married a Richard Warren in Great Amwell, Hertfordshire, on April 14, 1610.  The will of Augustine Walker, dated April 19, 1613, refers not only to his daughter Elizabeth Warren but also her 3 daughters: Mary, Ann and Sarah.  These three Warren daughters correspond to three of the Warren daughters who were passengers on the Anne in 1623.

http://www.pilgrimhall.org/richard_elizabeth_warren.htm

Alice (Carpenter) Bradford 1590–1670: Plymouth Colony

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Alice Carpenter (Southworth) Bradford

1590–1670

 my 10th great-grandmother

Constant SOUTHWORTH (1615 – 1679)
son of Alice CARPENTER
 
Alice SOUTHWORTH (1647 – 1719)
daughter of Constant SOUTHWORTH
 
Charles CHURCH (1682 – 1746)
son of Alice SOUTHWORTH
 
Constant CHURCH (1708 – 1740)
son of Charles CHURCH
 
Mary Reynolds CHURCH (1741 – 1781)
daughter of Constant CHURCH
 
Alfred BOSWORTH (1773 – 1861)
son of Mary Reynolds CHURCH
 
Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D. (1801 – 1843)
son of Alfred BOSWORTH
 
Franklin Smith BOSWORTH (1832 – 1919)
son of Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D.
 
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1870 – 1919)
son of Franklin Smith BOSWORTH
 
Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
son of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH
 
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.
 
Me
the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

Alice Carpenter was born on August 3, 1590, in Wrington, Somerset, England, the child of Alexander and Priscilla. She married Edward Southworth and they had two children together. She then married Governor William Bradford on August 14, 1623, in Plymouth, Massachusetts. She died on March 26, 1670, in Plymouth, Massachusetts, having lived a long life of 79 years.

William Bradford and Alice (Carpenter) Southworth: Gov. William Bradford, the son of William Bradford and Alice Hanson, was born in about 1590 and was baptized on Thursday, 19 March 1590 o.s. in St. Helen’s chapel, Austerfield, Yorkshire. He immigrated in 1620 to Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. He died at the age of about 67 on Tuesday, 19 May 1657 o.s. in Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. William Bradford (aged about 33) married Alice (Carpenter) Southworth (aged about 33) on Thursday, 14 August 1623 o.s. in Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. Alice (Carpenter) Southworth, the daughter of Alexander Carpenter, was born in about 1590 and was baptized on Monday, 3 August 1590 o.s. in Wrington [Wrentham], Somerset. She immigrated in July 1623 to Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. She died at the age of about 80 on Saturday, 26 March 1670 o.s. in Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. She was buried on Tuesday, 29 March 1670 o.s. in Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. Their children were: Maj. William Bradford, born on Thursday, 17 June 1624 o.s. in Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony, died on Sunday, 20 February 1704 o.s., buried in Burial Hill cemetery in Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He married Mary (Atwood) Holmes in 1677 in Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. Mercy Bradford, born before 1627. She married Benjamin Vermayes on Thursday, 21 December 1648 o.s. in Plymouth, New Plymouth Colony. Joseph Bradford, born in 1630, died on Sunday, 10 July 1715 o.s. in Kingston, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, buried in Burial Hill cemetery in Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts. He married Jael Hobart on Wednesday, 25 May 1664 o.s. in Hingham, New Plymouth Colony. Research Notes: William Bradford came over on the Mayflower. Torrey lists William Bradford (1590 (1588?) – 1657) m. Dorothy May, 9 Dec 1613, Amsterdam, Holland Alice was a widow. William, her son is listed with the surnames of both her husbands in the IGI. IGI lists William and Alice married as follows: William Bradford m. Alice Southworth 14 Aug 1623 William Bradford m. Alice Carpenter 14 Aug 1623 William Bradford m. Alice Southwaite 15 Aug 1623 William Bradford m. Alice Carpenter 24 Aug 1623 William Bradford m. Alice Richards 17 Jun 1624 Torrey lists: William Bradford m. Alice (Carpenter) Southworth 14 Aug 1623 1590-1657 c 1590-1670 IGI lists William (the son) both as William Bradford son of William Bradford and Alice Carpenter and as William Southworth son of Edward Southworth and Alice Carpenter. Since he was born ~44 weeks after William and Alice married, he would appear to be a legitimate Bradford. According to AHD: John Bradford (son of Gov. Bradford) m. Martha Browne Martha Browne 2nd m. Thomas Tracy (82-12)

Alice Carpenter Southworth Bradford

Alice Carpenter and her sisters (Agnes, Juliana, Mary and Priscilla) were part of the Leiden Separatist community. Alice married Edward Southworth; they had two sons, Constant and Thomas.

After Edward Southworth died, Alice Carpenter Southworth sailed to Plymouth on the Anne in 1623. Shortly after her arrival, she married Plymouth Governor William Bradford.
The marriage of William Bradford and Alice Carpenter Southworth was noted in a letter written by Emmanuel Altham to his brother Sir Edward Altham in September, 1623:
“Upon the occasion of the Governor’s marriage, since I came, Massasoit was sent for to the wedding, where came with him his wife, the queen, although he hath five wives. With him came four other kings and about six score men with their bows and arrows – where, when they came to our town, we saluted them with the shooting off of many muskets and training our men. And so all the bows and arrows was brought into the Governor’s house, and he brought the Governor three or four bucks and a turkey. And so we had very good pastime in seeing them dance, which is in such manner, with such a noise that you would wonder…
“And now to say somewhat of the great cheer we had at the Governor’s marriage. We had about twelve pasty venisons, besides others, pieces of roasted venison and other such good cheer in such quantity that I could wish you some of our share. For here we have the best grapes that ever you say – and the biggest, and divers sorts of plums and nuts which our business will not suffer us to look for.”
Sidney V. James, Jr., editor, Three Visitors to Early Plymouth
(Plymouth, Mass.: Plimoth Plantation, 1963), p. 29-30.
Constant and Thomas Southworth came to Plymouth sometime after 1627, they probably lived with their mother and stepfather. Alice and William Bradford had three children: William, Mercy and Joseph. William Bradford died in 1657, Alice died in 1670. Her death was noted in the Records of Plymouth Colony:
“On the 26th day of March, 1670, Mistris Allice Bradford, Seni’r, changed this life for the better, haueing attained to fourscore years of age, or therabouts. Shee was a godly matron, and much loued while shee liued, and lamented, tho aged, when shee died, and was honorabley enterred on the 29th day of the month aforsaid, att New Plymouth.”

Before her death, Alice Carpenter Southworth Bradford wrote a will.
Click here for that will as well as for the inventory of her estate at the time of her death.

Great source of information – 

My paternal grandmother, Helen Marie Hoagland (1907 – 1965)

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Helen Hoagland in Tom Thumb Wedding
Helen Marie Hoagland, second child on the left side of this photo, was my biological paternal grandmother. She took part in this “Tom Thumb Wedding” in Elgin, Kane County, Illinois.

When Helen Marie HOAGLAND was born on June 22, 1907, in Elgin, Illinois, her father, Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND, was 27 and her mother, Mabel Gladys HAWLEY, was 26.

She was married three times and had four sons. 

Helen Marie HOAGLAND married William Benjamin Shales, Jr. on March 22, 1924, in Elgin, Illinois, when she was 16 years old. They had one son, William David “Bill” Shales on March 17, 1925, in Elgin, Illinois. Helen and William Benjamin Shales, Jr., were divorced on June 27, 1927, in Elgin, Illinois, after 3 years of marriage. She was 20 years old. 

Helen Marie HOAGLAND married Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH on February 7, 1931, in Elgin, Illinois, when she was 23 years old. They had a son born September 21, 1931, in Chicago, Illinois. That son was placed for adoption, later to be adopted by the Mosiman family. His first name was John. Helen and Wilder had a son, Frank Hunt Bosworth was born on June 19, 1933, in Chicago, Illinois. Another son was born to the couple, Wilder Morris Bosworth II, on September 7, 1935, in Chicago, Illinois. His nickname was “Tuffy”.

Helen Marie HOAGLAND married Millard Ayres “Boots” Mason on May 5, 1945, in Biloxi, Mississippi, when she was 37 years old.

She died on September 13, 1965, in her hometown, Elgin, Illinois, at the age of 58 of Leukemia at St. Joseph’s Hospital. 

—–

Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
married names: Shales, Bosworth and Mason
paternal grandmother
 
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
 
Me
the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II
Helen Marie Hoagland Family Tree
Helen Marie Hoagland (1907 – 1965) – Elgin, IL and Biloxi, Mississippi residences. She was married to Dr. Wilder Morris Bosworth, D.D.S., my paternal grandfather.

 


Helen Marie Hoagland’s family history was a lively part of  the pioneer days of Elgin, Illinois.

1e6eecc9-6236-48ca-9784-c475111a15ab
The Story About the Balking Horse and Sam Hoagland – Elgin, Kane, Illinois, USA Composed By Merrill O Calame ~ A Poem originally printed in the Elgin Daily Courier copied by Granddaughter Helen Hoagland. Helen was Samuel Hoagland’s grandaughter. A copy of this poem was taken from “The Bosworth Family History” written by Frank Hunt Bosworth II and designed by Robin Melissa Bosworth Reininger (Granddaughter of Helen Marie Hoagland) into this printing.

 


Occupation: Interior Decorator, Proprietor of Mason Interiors in Biloxi, Mississippi with her husband, Millard Ayes “Boots” Mason. As my grandmother, I called her “Macy” from her last married name.

Helen Mason 1958 City Directory Listing
Helen Mason 1958 City Directory Listing with M.A. Mason and my father Frank

 

My Grandmother Helen was a gifted pianist and songstress. She especially loved to spend time with me. I recall her playing her piano and singing to entertain me. I remember her laughter and her smiles. I know she loved me with all her heart. She bought me beautiful dresses, hats and purses. Our relationship was very close after I was born and until she left for Elgin when I was still a little girl. After “Macy” left, my mother took me to visit her husband’s grave at Southern Memorial Cemetery in Biloxi several times- we called him “Boots”. I visited Grandmother Helen when she was in St. Joseph’s Hospital in Elgin when she suffered with leukemia and it was determined she would not live much longer. She died when I was nine years old. 


My Grandmother Helen held an immense amount of family history notes, photos and newspaper collections for the Hoagland/Bosworths. When she died, my father, Frank Bosworth came into possession of these articles and charts and wrote his own family history with the information from this collection. According to my father’s family history account, my grandmother Helen worked with his grandmother Bertha Swan Bosworth (paternal) to compile a family history. They were the two true genealogists on that side of the tree. When my father passed that family history to me, I transcribed his handwritten family history into text form. I took the family history he’d given to me and have grown the collection on my paternal side of my family to what it is today. It was the basis for the “Wings of Angels” family tree on Ancestry.com today. I later added my mother’s family tree to the “Wings of Angels” family tree. I had little to work with on her side of the family, so I started from scratch about 30 years ago trying to piece that together. These days, as an adult, I call “Macy” by the name of Grandmother Helen when referring to her. She is my inspiration for all the Hoagland/Bosworth genealogy research I do today. I am proud to follow in my grandmother’s footsteps as I continue to follow my genealogy passion. I consider my Grandmother Helen and my Great Grandmother Bertha Swan Bosworth the “Wings of Angels” that started my family tree. — note by Helen Marie’s grandaughter Tenderly


My Grandmother Helen was a lifelong Methodist.


Helen Marie Hoagland married William Benjamin Shales, Jr. on March 22, 1924, in Elgin, Illinois, when she was 16 years old. Their son, William David “Bill” Shales was born on March 27, 1925. Helen and Bill were divorced on June 27, 1927, in Elgin, Illinois, after three years of marriage. She was 20 years old.

Helen Marie Hoagland married Wilder Morris Bosworth I on February 7, 1931, in Elgin, Illinois, when she was 23 years old. Wilder was attending dental school around the year of 1931 in Chicago when their first son was born and my mother told me the child was put up for adaption. The child’s adoptive name was John Mosiman. My father Frank Hunt Bosworth was born in 1933 and my uncle Wilder Morris “Tuffy” Bosworth II was born in 1935, in Chicago, Illinois. Wilder was still in dental school. 

 Helen and Wilder, along with sons Frank and “Tuffy” lived in Safety Harbor, Florida, where my grandfather established his first dental practice in 1935.

In 1936, Wilder established a dental practice in Biloxi, Mississippi. 

Helen and Wilder Morris Bosworth were divorced on September 13, 1941, in Biloxi, Mississippi, after 10 years of marriage. She was 34 years old.

Helen married Millard Ayres “Boots” Mason on May 5, 1945, in Biloxi, Mississippi, when she was 37 years old.

Helen’s husband Millard Ayres “Boots” Mason passed away on October 24, 1960, in Biloxi, Mississippi, at the age of 59. They had been married 15 years.

Helen Marie Hoagland died on September 13, 1965, in Elgin, Illinois, when she was 58 years old. Helen’s remains were donated for research at Northwestern University where it was cremated. She has no known burial site or memorial that I could find.


 

 

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Helen and Millard Mason’s Home on Beach Blvd – Photo taken in the 1990’s. Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA. Before Katrina hit the Coast, this house was located right on Highway 90 directly across the street from the Gulf of Mexico. It was on a corner. I if it survived the storm. I know it survived Camille. I took this photo visiting the Coast on vacation.
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Helen Marie Hoagland Shales Bosworth Mason – Unknown year Biloxi, Mississippi and Elgin, Illinois
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Rosie S. Morris with Millard Ayers “Boots” and Helen Hoagland Mason. Mississippi Gulf Coast Out for supper at the “White House” Restaurant. It used to be a favorite place to dine for many Gulf Coast residents. I believe that shadow photographer may be my mother’s shadow and I would have been four years old at the time of this photo so was that me beside her?

 

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Birthday Party for Tenderly Rose abt 1958 Gulfport, Harrison, Mississippi, USA Bama Smith Grayson, Tenderly Rose Bosworth held by Janie Morris Bosworth, Rosie S. Morris, Patsy Grayson Gendron and Helen Hoagland Bosworth Mason standing together on front yard of “Hungry Hill” at 1711 Wisteria Street. Gulf Gardens. Home of Thelma Lefeve in background.

 

 

And so I began…

Image Posted on Updated on

 

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The Daily Herald

 

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A birthday party for Tenderly Rose: Gulfport, Harrison, Mississippi, USA – Left to right in photo: Bama Smith Grayson (my great aunt), Tenderly Rose Bosworth (me) held by Janie Morris Bosworth (momma), Rosie S. Morris (my maternal grandmother), Patsy Grayson Gendron (momma’s cousin) and Helen Hoagland Bosworth Mason (my paternal grandmother) standing together on front yard of “Hungry Hill” at 1711 Wisteria Street.