Genealogy, Family History, Wings of Angels, The Tenderly Rose Collection

Mrs. John Rankin Harkness Visits Daughter in Grand Bay, Alabama

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August 03, 1907
Daily Herald
Biloxi, Mississippi
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PERSONAL – Those Who Travel
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Mrs. J. R. Harkness and little grand-daughter, Irene and Alethea Harkness, left for a visit to Grand Bay, Ala., this morning to visit Mrs. D. E. Morris.

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Some Family History for My Daddy Jim, Capt. James Peter Estrada, Child of Spanish Immigrants

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My Daddy Jim and Grandma Angela
Capt. James Peter Estrada as a child with his mother, Angela (Franquet) Estrada in New York.
James Peter Estrada
Capt. James Peter Estrada as a boy-Lake Champlain-late 1930s.

My Daddy Jim, was born James Peter Estrada to James and Angela (Franquet) Estrada in New York, USA, on May 7, 1934. In 1940, a U. S. Census shows a five year old James Estrada living with his parents, the only child. The census shows little James’ 31 year old father, a diamond setter in the jewelry industry, as having been born in France, and his 30 year old mother, Angela, a dressmaker in the dress manufacturing business, having been born in Spain. The couple rented the home at 172 111th Street in Queens, New York.

Grandma Angela and Grandpa Jim with Daddy Jim
Grandma Angela (Franquet) and Grandpa Jim with little Jim Estrada – 1930s

I know he attended Georgia Military Academy.

I don’t know how he and my mother, Janie Morris, met. I do know they were married at a chapel on Keesler Air Force Base, Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi.

Janie and Jim Estrada Just Married
James Peter Estrada and Janie Morris just married.

I have had trouble finding documentation for Daddy Jim’s life events and accomplishments other than the newspaper articles and information I collected for his death. 

Capt. James Peter Estrada
Capt. James Peter Estrada-Southern Memorial Park, Biloxi, Mississippi

About Daddy Jim’s parents and grandparents:

From this point forward for the sake of simplicity, I will refer to my Daddy Jim as “Jim” and his father as James Sr. I know from family history told to me by my Grandma Angela that James Sr. was born of a Spanish family that had migrated to Paris in the jewelry trade. I recall spending much time with both of my adopted grandparents, the Estradas, in Houston, Texas, where my Grandpa Jim Estrada had retired after years in the oil industry.

At some point, James’s father went to work for Gulf Oil in Venezuela, but Jim stayed behind in the United States to attend military academies. In Venezuela, a sister, Beatrice, was born. I found passenger records of Jim having traveled to Venezuela for visits to his parents. 

James, Sr. was born Dec. 19, 1908 in Paris, France. James, Sr., died in Houston, Texas, July 13, 1967, of multiple myeloma (cancer) at the age of 58. I remember when he passed away. He was buried at Southern Memorial Park in Biloxi, Mississippi, near his son, Capt. James Peter Estrada. He wanted to be buried by his son. James, Sr., migrated to New York with his parents as a young child. He spoke French and Spanish.

Obit for James Peter Estrada (1908-1967)
Obit for James Peter Estrada (1908-1967) from The Daily Herald, July 15, 1967, p. 2

My Grandma Angela (Franquet) Estrada’s Obituary
ESTRADA
Angela Franquet Estrada, beloved wife, mother and grandmother went home to be with the Lord on July 8, 2006.  She was born in Valencia, Spain on November 10, 1909.  Preceded in death by her parents; two sisters and two brothers; her husband, James Estrada; and son, Captain James Peter Estrada.  Survived by her daughter, Beatrice Hood and husband Dean; grandsons, Alan Hood and wife Lorie, and Douglas Hood of Houston; and daughter-in-law, Jane Estrada of Gulfport, Miss.; grandchildren, Tenderly, Angela, Alison, James P. Estrada and wife Jan; five great-grandchildren; and one great great grandchild.  She retired from Esther Wolf and Everitt Beulow.
A Memorial Service will be held at Grace Bible Church, 13700 Schroeder Rd., Houston, TX on Wednesday, July 12, 2006 at 3:00pm.  In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Still Creek Ranch, 6055 Hearne Lane, Bryan, TX 77808, or Vitas Hospice, 4828 Loop Central Dr., Suite 890, Houston, TX 77081.

Gravesites for James Estrada and Angela (Franquet) Estrada-Southern Memorial Park-Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi
Gravesites for James Estrada and Angela (Franquet) Estrada-Southern Memorial Park-Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi

James, Sr.’s father was named James “Jaime” Estrada. He was born July 25, 1888 in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, and died in December of 1970 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. I met “Yiyo” the nickname for him. He had flown up to Gulfport to see us. I recall he had a pistol in his luggage, which greatly concerned my mother, and he had a “youth tonic” he drank every morning involving honey and lemon juice. He had a good disposition and spoke only Spanish and French, I think. James, Sr., was a jeweler-having been in business in Paris before establishing himself in New York as a jeweler. 

James, Sr.’s mother was named Conchita Torres. Conchita Torres, James, Sr.,’s mother, was born May 21, 1886 in Puebla de Castro, Spain. I don’t have records for her death. 

According to documentation, both Jaime and Conchita’s arrival dates were 1911 and 1912, respectively, from Paris, France.

In 1920, James “Jaime” and Conchita (Torres) Estrada, along with their son, James lived at 298 East 77th Street in Manhattan Assembly District 14, in New York, New York. “Jaime” was listed at a jeweler and he was listed as “Papers submitted”. In 1930, they still lived at the Manhattan address above listed as and Conchita was listed as “Alien”. Jaime was listed as “First papers”. By 1940, at the same Manhattan address, “Conchita” was listed as having “First papers”. 

I have not found documentation for the parents for Jaime or Conchita at this time. That information would be in Spain, I would presume, and I have no access to those records. I am still looking, though.

Here is just one of the documents I had found in support of the family history I am working on for Daddy Jim’s genealogy:

Naturalization Papers for Conchita (Torres) Estrada
Naturalization Papers for Conchita (Torres) Estrada

Tenderly Rose and Fluffy
Tenderly Rose and Grandma Angela’s dog, Fluffy, in Houston. Abt. 1959

Having had two fathers in my life, I grew up without either one. I was born to Capt. and Mrs. Frank Hunt Bosworth. My mother was Janie Morris. They divorced soon after I was born, and as the story was told to me, my mother met and married Jim Estrada. They were married when I was about two years old. Jim adopted me as his child. I was raised as Jim Estrada’s child and he is the one I have the most cherished childhood memories any child could ever dream of. I have hung onto those memories-they are as clear as if they happened yesterday.

The Estrada family shared their love with me as if I was a child born with their blood. I cherished them, especially my Aunt Bea-Bea. I grew up with the Estrada name and was always very proud of it. I am forever grateful for the time I spent with them and the advantages that went with being part of their family. Every summer I can remember, my siblings and I were packed up and sent to Houston to have extended visits with our Texas Estradas. This included the Hood family my Aunt Bea-Bea eventually married into. We had very good times! We swam in the icy cold rice wells in Katy, Texas, at Uncle Dean’s sister’s farm – the McIroys, I believe were their names. Uncle Dean always had to win at Monopoly and Aunt Bea-Bea made the most delicious food. One dish I remember was some sort of Mexican casserole. The houses in Ponderosa Forest, a subdivision of Houston were amazing to experience. My Uncle Dean had been a builder of some of those houses. Aunt Bea-Bea was a teacher and one of the most positive influences in my life. I can hear her laughter as I write this.

The Estrada Family on Wisteria St
A visit from the Estradas. I’m on the left of the photo, my Aunt Bea is second from the right of the photo and Grandma Angela is on the far right of the photo. My mother, Janie is peaking around my Aunt Bea’s head. She is standing next to Uncle Pete’s son and Uncle Pete is in front of his son. My two sisters are in the front of the photo. Gulfport, Mississippi.

My Grandma Angela, “Granny Annie”, as we called her in the 60’s always made sure we had beautiful dresses and swimwear from Esther Wolfe, the store she worked at, and she provide tennis lessons for us at one of the townhouse developments she lived in. We had a blast with her. She was a very fastidious and clean housekeeper and we were expected to make our beds every day or we couldn’t go swimming at the pool if we didn’t. It just was really the best of time when we went to Houston. I wanted to live there. 

It was always so exciting when Grandma Angela speed down the “freeway” heading to downtown Houston. She would holler out, “Get out of my way, you old fossil!” if she had to pass a car. We always giggled because the person in the other car appeared to be her age. I remember one trip to the Galleria for shopping. I had never seen a shopping mall quite like that one. It was new when I was there. She took me to an art gallery because she knew I loved art and always encouraged me. When she got much older, she took painting classes and produced some pretty impressive artwork herself. I was so proud of her!

The Estrada Crew in Texas
The Estrada Crew, as my mother, Janie, liked to call us, in my Aunt Bea Estrada’s wedding to Dean Hood. I am the tallest one. 1960’s.

As a family, we spent many holidays in Houston with the Estradas. The Christmas lights were just fantastic. The trips we made in the car were long and kind of miserable. We traveled with six of use in the car. Momma drove, Mamaw (her mother) rode shotgun and four of us kids had to sit in the back of the station wagon along with ice chests filled with food and luggage. We did take breaks at rest stops and that helped. When we got to Houston, it was all worth it.

Aunt Bea (Estrada) Hood and Grandma Angela (Franquet) Estrada 1990s.
Aunt Bea (Estrada) Hood standing behind Grandma Angela (Franquet) Estrada. 1990s. The last photo I have of them. This was at my brother’s wedding in Mississippi.

 

 

 

 

 

My Grandmother’s Mississippi Driver’s Manual

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Scrapbook 4
My grandmother’s Mississippi Drivers Handbook
Scrapbook 3
My grandmother’s Mississippi Drivers Handbook
Scrapbook 2
My grandmother’s Mississippi Drivers Handbook
Scrapbook 1
My grandmother’s Mississippi Drivers Handbook

I have no idea what year this handbook was distributed. My grandmother, Rosie (Smith) Morris, told me she was given this to study if she wanted to get her driver’s license. Her husband was owned and operated a car dealership and he gave her a car. After she took the car on a test drive, and she ran off the road, she refused to drive it from then on. She never got her license, by the way. She preferred to ride the bus or take a cab. — T.Rose

“The Flames” – Biloxi Business District in Ashes – October 13, 1894

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Biloxi Daily Herald

October 13, 1894

THE FLAMES

A PORTION OF THE PRINCIPAL STREET OF BILOXI IN ASHES.


Business Houses and Residences Were Burned Like so Much Chaff


LOSS ABOUT $75,000—INSURANCE $28,000.

Heroic Action of Firemen and Citizens


Biloxi has again been visited by a conflagration more sweeping in extent and entailing a financial loss greater than that of the fire of June, 1889. Friday morning about 2 o’clock a private watchman discovered flames issuing from the two-story building of Jos. W. Swetman, located on Pass Christian st., main thoroughfare, and in the most densely populated portion of the city. The alarm was sounded and the fire department turned out in quick order, but the flames had gained such headway that it was impossible to save the building and efforts of the firemen were directed to those adjoining. The Swetman building was occupied by J. W. Swetman a drug-store with sleeping apartments on the second floor occupied by his family, and so rapidly did the fire eat its way that the family were only able to hastily gather a few articles of clothing and make their escape. Another portion of this building on the first floor was occupied John W. Henley, as a oyster saloon. Adjoining the Swetman building, and on the west the fire quickly communicated to the engine room of Mechanics Fire Co., and from that to the Masonic Opera House, a large frame structure. Continuing its course west, on Pass Christian street, the two buildings owned by John Eistetter, one occupied by J. H. Murphy as a blacksmith shop, and the other by P. Ferzar, as a lunch house, were consumed as was also the tin shop belonging to Dan Markey, and a small residence, both in the rear and owned by Jno. Eistetter. Crossing Magnolia street the storehouse and dwelling of Miss St. Tual was soon in ashes. The fire in its eastern course was checked with the burning of the market-house of Felix Borries, by the most desperate and heroic work on the part of both firemen and citizens.


Before this time, however, buildings were burning in all directions, and it looked as if the larger portion of the city would be consumed before the wrath of the fiery monster was appeased. Opposite the Opera House the large two-story business house and dwelling of S. Picard was in flames, and in the flying cinders the intense heat almost immediately ignited the residence of W. K. M. Dukate, on the east and a cottage on Magnolia street, owned by N. Voivedich and occupied by F. W. Eaton. With the destruction of the last named building the flames were, checked on Magnolia street, although the house south of it and occupied by T. E. Colline, was badly scorched.

On the south side of Pass Christian street the residence of Mrs. Rich and a small building adjoining, occupied as a candy store were being rapidly reduced to ashes only to be followed in quick succession by the building occupied by Joseph Lawrence as a shoe shop, and the barber shop J. Kilk both owned by George Ohr, Sr. From the barber shop the next to fall a prey to the fiery demon was the large two-story building owned by Chas. Redding and occupied by him as a residence and grocery store. South of Redding’s a cottage belonging to Dr. J. J. Lemon and occupied by Mrs. Kelty, was burned as was also a two-story cottage adjoining, belonging to Geo. Ohr, Sr. On the north side of Pass Christian st., and east of the Swetman building, four small buildings owned by the same gentlemen, were destroyed—one of these was without a tenant and the other occupied by Sing Lee as a laundry; H. Eikel, merchant tailor; and Mrs. Ohr, grocer.


The fire in this direction was checked at the building owned by Mrs. Amare and occupied by Keel & Jennett, grocers. This building was damaged to the extent of about $100, and it seemed at times beyond the power of human beings to save the structure and it was only by almost superhuman efforts that the flames were checked at this point. The destruction of this building would have followed by the loss of many more, and with this appalling fact staring them in the face the firemen worked with redoubled vigor and until their hands and faces were scorched and blistered by the devouring element.


In the rear of the property last destroyed stood the famous pottery of Geo. E. Ohr, whose shop during the past severel [sic] years has been visited by hundreds of visitors from other sections and from almost every State in the Union, seeking relics in artistic pottery. In a few moments the toil and work of Ohr, the artistic potter, was reduced to ashes.

In the rear of the opera-house the planning mills of John R. Harkness & Sons, together with a large amount of finished work and lumber, was destroyed.


In the upper story of the opera-house were the lodge rooms of the Masons and Knights of Pythias. The regalia and all paraphernalia of both orders were completely destroyed, only the secretary’s and treasurer’s books of the Masonic order being saved.


On the ground floor of the opera-house was the office of the Postal Telegraph Co., and the watch-maker shop of B. M. Root, both suffering a total loss.


Fortunately there was but little wind during the conflagration, else the damage would have been more than doubled. As it was, houses several blocks away from the seat of the fire were ignited by flying cinders, and it was only by the closest surveillance that many other buildings were not added to the conflagration.


The Convent of Mercy, situated some distance from the scene, was on fire twice, but before gaining any headway, the flames were extinguished.


During the height of the fire, and until it was well under control, much excitement prevailed among residents in the neighborhood. Houses were emptied of their contents, and vehicles of all sorts were pressed in service to aid in conveying the goods to a place of safety. In many instances this was found to be unnecessary. Household goods were piled helter-skelter in every direction, and when daylight came, the scene presented cannot be described. The area of the fire covers the larger portion of four squares in the heart of the city and as the buildings destroyed were all of wood, there was little resistance to the flames.


[Partially illegible paragraph] paraphernalia, $500; insurance on opera-house, $1500.
Knights of Pythias, $1000; insurance, $600.
Geo. Ohr, Sr., $5000; no insurance.
John R. Harkness & Sons, $3000; no insurance.
Miss St. Tual, $700; insurance, $2000.
Geor E. Ohr, $3000; no insurance.
H. Eikel, $2800; insurance $1000.
J. Kilk, $400; no insurance.
Jos. Lawrence, $100; no insurance.
Mrs. Rich (2 houses), loss unknown.
Dan Markey, $250; no insurance.
Mechanics’ Steam Fire Co., $400; no insurance.
J. H. Murphy, $100; no insurance.
Felix Borries, $400, no insurance.
N. Voivedich, $700; no insurance.
F. W. Eaton, $00; no insurance.
J. Eistetter, $1000; no insurance.
B. M. Root, $400; no insurance.
P. Ferrar, $800; no insurance.


The insurance is divided among the following companies of E. W. Morrill’s agencies:
Royal $00; Harford, $6450; American Fire, $2345; Phoenix of London, $2275; Phenix of Brooklyn, $2550; Lancashire, $2000; Queen, $1500; Liverpool, London and Globe, $3500; Mechanics and Traders, $3200.


In but few instances was any portion of the contents of the burned buildings saved, and then only in a damaged condition. There is also considerable loss in the way of outhouses, stables, fences, etc.


The Electric Light Co. lose [sic] about $6000 in the destruction of poles wires, transformers, etc.


Many of those burned out will commence rebuilding at once. The loss is a severe one to our people, and to many is the loss of all their possessions. The business men who own property along Pass Christian st., to whom a Herald reporter has talked to on the subject signify their willingness to widen the street ten feet on either side than its present width.


The Herald building was threatened by flying cinders, and had it not been covered with abestos [sic], there is but little doubt that the roof would have ignited and it would have been almost impossible to have saved the building from destruction, and that or other and valuable property. Owners having property in the west end of town can thank their lucky stars that this office was covered by asbestos [sic], for had it burned the destruction would have been three fold greater than now recorded.


 

My great great grandfather John Rankin Harkness’s business is mentioned as destroyed in this article. Capt. John Rankin Harkness (1830-1903) was one of the founders of the Biloxi Fire Dept. He was born in Pelham, Hampshire, Massachusetts, the son of William Harkness and Abigail Turner.

Capt. John Rankin HARKNESS (1830 – 1903) — My 2nd great-grandfather

Edna Irene HARKNESS (1880 – 1952), daughter of Capt. John Rankin HARKNESS

John Harkness MORRIS (1901 – 1965), son of Edna Irene HARKNESS

Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013), daughter of John Harkness MORRIS

Me, the daughter of Janie Lucille MORRIS

 

 

Moss Point Odd Fellows’ Celebration at the residence of Mr. John Wesley Morris

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The Pascagoula Democrat Star

May 4, 1894

Odd Fellows’ Celebration.


Last Friday night at the residence of Mr. John W. Morris Moss Point Lodge N. 117 I. O. O. F. gave a grand celebration in honor of the 75th anniversary of the order. The lodge occupied the spacious gallery of the residence and the guests were seated under the large oaks. The grounds were beautifully lighted. After the opening ceremonies of the lodge, readings descriptive of the objects and purposes of Odd Fellowship were given by Messrs. C. M. Fairley and R. W. Cowan, and the exercises concluded with an able, interesting and instructive address on the past, present and future of Odd Fellowship by Prof. M. Caldwell, whose remarks were warmly applauded. After its conclusion all present were invited to partake of the good things prepared for their entertainment. It was the unanimous expression that the occasion had been a most delightful and profitable one and will be the means of increasing interest in this noble order. Moss Point Lodge No 117 was organized with six members Sept. 13, 1893, and during its short life has increased to thirty-four members, and its good influence has been felt in this community. The present officers are: J. W. Stewart, P. G.; D. E. Morris, N. G.; C. W. Garner, V. G.; A. F. Dantzler, secretary and Chas H. Wood, treasurer.


John Wesley MORRIS (1839 – 1896) was my great-great grandfather.

David Edmund “D.E.” MORRIS (1866 – 1934), son of John Wesley MORRIS

John Harkness MORRIS (1901 – 1965), son of David Edmund “D.E.” MORRIS

Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013), daughter of John Harkness MORRIS

Me,  the daughter of Janie Lucille MORRIS

 

 

Bola Lafayette “Bolie” Smith 1888-1970

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Laurel Leader Call

August 10, 1970

DEATHS

B. L. SMITH

Funeral services for B. L. Smith, 82, 860 South Magnolia, were held Monday at 11 a.m. from the chapel of Thompson Funeral Home with the Rev. Tom Sumrall officiating. Burial was in Crestview Cemetery.

Smith died Saturday in a Laurel hospital after a short illness. He was born in Neshoba County, Mar. 28, 1888. He was a member of Magnolia Street Baptist Church, and a retired carpenter.

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Tama Aultman Smith; three daughters: Mrs. J. T. McKinney, Gainsville, Fla; Mrs. Elson Boutwell, New Orleans, La.; and Mrs. Franklin Rhoades, Hobart Ind.; two sons: Dick Smith, Ellisville; and J. W. Smith, Decatur, Ala.; 13 grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; six sisters: Mrs. Josie Harris, Jackson; Mrs. Betty Harper, Collins; Mrs. Rosie Morris, Mrs. Mattie Bell Robertson and Mrs. Bama Grayson, all of Gulfport; and Mrs. Bertie Quinn, Pascagoula; and three brothers: Levi Smith, Crossett, Ark.: Sylvester Smith and Bradie Smith, both of Laurel.

 


 

Bola Lafayette “Bolie” Smith (1888 – 1970)
Was my great-uncle…
Mary Jane RICE (1867 – 1947)
mother of Bola Lafayette “Bolie” Smith
Rosa Anna Elizabeth “Rosie” SMITH (1895 – 1984)
daughter of Mary Jane RICE
Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013)
daughter of Rosa Anna Elizabeth “Rosie” SMITH
Me
the daughter of Janie Lucille MORRIS

Beatriz Zuniga Dónde Estás?

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My mother had numerous baby books for me, some she sent me years ago and then others she had hidden from me because they had my birth last name in them. I’ve been scanning in old photos, some I’ve never seen, from a baby book I had never seen until after my mother passed away a few years ago and it was sent to me.
 
I found this photo of a young woman named Beatriz Zuniga holding me as I chewed on my mother’s twirling baton. On the back of the photo was Beatriz’s name, and a note that she was from Guatemala. I later found a note in my baby book that Beatriz was my “Honorary Godmother”. I was raised as a Southern Baptist, so in those days there were not really any Godparents for our religion. I had several I knew of when I was growing up, but, none were ever involved in my life when I was growing up, so I was surprised to find this photo. The photo was taken at the University of Southern Mississippi, where I stayed in the Home Ec Dept. while my mother attended school there.
 
My mother called the young students who cared for me overnite on campus in the Home Ec buildings my “Southern Mommas”. My mother stayed in a dorm with her sorority sisters on campus. These students were responsible for my care as part of the curriculum there at USM. I am amazed with this photo — I’ve had a lifelong love affair with the Spanish language and cultures that speak the language. I only know a little bit of Spanish. I am wondering if my Southern Momma Beatriz had an influence in my infancy that fostered my love of diversity.
 
There are many other reasons I love the Spanish/Mexican/South American culture and language, but, I have to say I was very intrigued to learn of Beatriz yesterday. I spent some time on Ancestry looking for Beatriz Zuniga. There were several. I thought I’d share this photo with you because it is so sweet. I’d love to find her. But, if I can’t find her, I know she is special to me. I will share this little story on my blog, The Tenderly Rose Collection. Wouldn’t it be neat if somehow I could reconnect with her?
041-2
Beatriz Zuniga, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, 1956 holding Tenderly Rose – the Home Economics baby. Beatriz was an “honorary godparent” to Tenderly Rose.