Biloxi Harrison County Mississippi

Enjoyable Garden Party at the Misses Harkness Residence

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Biloxi Daily Herald

July 24, 1928

ENJOYABLE GARDEN PARTY

Miss Stella Harkness and Miss May Harkness entertained with a garden party on Monday night at their home on West Howard avenue, for all the Harkness “kin”. Many of this large family, who live away from Biloxi, are here on visits, and furnished inspiration for this gathering which included 54 members of the family, in-laws and children, with a very few friends. Stunts, games, music and happy reminiscing made the evening pass all too quickly. Japeneze [sic] lanterns illuminated the garden where a number of seats had been arranged and punch was served throughout the evening. Delicious ice cream and cake also were served. Among those attending were Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Harkness and children from Texas, Mrs. Holston and daughter Peggy from Lynchburg, Va., Mr. and Mrs. Roy Roberts of D’lo, Miss Sadie Harkness from Jacksonville, Fla., Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Chaffee and little daughter. Miss John Harkness, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Gilligan, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Peresich and children, Dr. and Mrs. B. Z. Welch and children, Rev. J. L. Jordan, Mrs. Earl Rohrer and children from Gulfport, Miss Abbie May Harkness, Beulah Harkness, Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Wilkes, Rev. and Mrs. W. M. Sullivan and Miss Katherine Sullivan, Mrs. D. E. Morris, Miss Irene Morris and Miss Martha Morris from Mobile and Misses Stella and May Harkness.

Things Seen in Biloxi

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Biloxi Daily Herald

June 24, 1928

Main St. Methodist Church Choir Watermelon Cutting

The choir of the Main Street Methodist Church enjoyed a watermelon cutting at the home of H. B. Rickey in Bay Terrace, following choir rehearsal last Friday night. A very gay time was had by these choir members, among whom were Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Barbour, Miss Laurine Barbour, Miss Nelson, Miss Irene Morris, Miss Martha Morris, Mrs. Adams, H. B. Rush, Miss Helen Rush, Miss Stella Harkness, Miss May Harkness and Miss Naomi Lockett.


 

THINGS SEEN IN BILOXI

(Q. Q. McIntryre)

Last Friday evening the choir of the Main Street Methodist Church met for rehearsal, after which they motored out to the beautiful home of H. B. Ricky in Bay Terrace where one least sees any sort of disturbance. Soon after the arrival of the first division H. B. Rush came with a bountiful supply of luscious watermelons that would tempt a Southern darkey to spend his last nickel.

These were sliced so as to give each one a full feed. Everything was calm and serene. In fact you would have suspected nothing but perfect harmony, but such was not the case. The evidence of war were to be seen. The smoke of battle was beginning to appear. Suddenly W. L. Barbour and Mr. Rush were the victims of an attack. This they could not stand. The call to the front was made instantly. Rush, Barbour and Rickey were in line of battle, eyes distended, teeth tight, fists clenched, ready for the fray. This was met by the second line, with Miss Naomi Lockett, the Morris sisters of Mobile, who are visiting their aunts, the Misses Harkness, assisted by Miss Helen Rush who acted as spy to the enemy. The battle raged. Soon all army rules were forgotten, the borders of the battlefield were enlarged, ranks were broken, no respect for lines. It was a hand to hand fight with H. B. Rush claiming the victory in the first skirmish and retired with a look of serene satisfaction. The ammunition was the cold juicy, red meat of the watermelon. All during the long battle, Miss Stella Harkness of the post office, remained neutral and with the utmost indifference, wielded her fork steadily. Much damage was done to clothing and permanent waves, but all were forgiven and the jolly, fun loving pastor, the Rev. W. M. Sullivan, poured oil on the troubled waters, as all good preachers should, and with both sides claiming the victory, all declared Mr. Rickey to be a wonderful host and were sorry that they trampled his spacious and well kept lawn.

Frank Bosworth’s Birthday Party – 6 Years old in 1939!

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Biloxi Daily Herald

June 20, 1939

FRANK BOSWORTH’S PARTY

Frank Hunt Bosworth II son of Dr. and Mrs. W. M. Bosworth of West Howard Avenue, celebrated his sixth birthday anniversary with a party Monday afternoon. Games were played in the house and on the lawn, with punch being served throughout the afternoon by Mrs. Bosworth, assisted by Mesdames Roy Roper, Thomas Atkinson and Olga Sewell. Ice cream and cake were served following the games, with all the little guests around the beautifully decorated table, where all sang Happy Birthday to Frank, he making a wish and blowing out all six candles at once and cutting the first slice of cake. Those enjoying this party were Frank and Tuffy Bosworth, Lucille Roper, J. J. McCarthy, Gwendolyn and Kenneth Sewell, Elizabeth and Tommy Atkinson, Rosalie and Roland Bersch, Mesdames C. A. Erskin, Roland Bersch, Thomas Atkinson, Roy Roper, Olga Sewell and Mrs. Bosworth.


Relationship: My biological father.

Mayors of Biloxi

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Biloxi Daily Herald

October 31, 1934

MAYORS OF BILOXI — The earliest records available begin with the ‘50’s. L. E. Pradat was “president of the town” and “selectmen” served with him in 1857. The next record now at City Hall states that James Fewell was mayor in 1861 and James Blythe served as mayor protem  during that year, and the selectmen had become “aldermen.” Other mayors of which there are records are:

1866 – John L. Henley

1868 – Lyman B. Holley

            (There is a loss of records for a few years)

1875 – H. J. Meaut

1877 – Lyman B. Holley

1878-1880 – R. Caillavet

1881-1882 – F. W. Elmer

1883-(part) – J. R. Harkness

1883-1884 – Emile Laudner

1885-1886 – J. A. Bousquet

1887-1888 – Emile Laudner

1888 – John Walker

1889-1890 – Harry T. Howard

1891 – F. W. Elmer

1893-1894 – John A. Bousquet

1895-1913 – Edward Glennan

1914-1933 – John J. Kennedy

1933-1934 – R. Hart Chinn

 


 

Mayor J. R. Harkness was my Great Great Grandfather:

Capt. John Rankin HARKNESS (1830 – 1903)
2nd great-grandfather
Edna Irene HARKNESS (1880 – 1952)
daughter of Capt. John Rankin HARKNESS
John Harkness MORRIS (1901 – 1965)
son of Edna Irene HARKNESS
Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013)
daughter of John Harkness MORRIS
Me

Wilder Bosworth Ill

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Biloxi Daily Herald

Sept. 09, 1958

WILDER BOSWORTH ILL

Wilder Morris Bosworth, 23, husband of the former Virginia Champlin, and son of Mrs. W. [sic-should be Millard] A. Mason of Biloxi and Dr. Wm [sic-should be Wilder] M. Bosworth, Columbus, Miss., is in critical condition at VA Hospital, New Orleans. He completed his service in the Navy three months ago and planned to attend Perkinston Junior College.

His brother, Frank, now stationed at Ft. Jackson, S. C., awaiting shipment to Fort Benning, GA., to attend Officers Candidate School Oct. 13 is home on emergency leave and members of Wilder’s family also are in New Orleans with him.


Wilder Morris “Tuffy” Bosworth Jr. (1935 – 1958)
My Uncle
Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
father of Wilder Morris “Tuffy” Bosworth Jr.

 Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.

Me –  the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

The Death of Wilder Morris Bosworth, Jr.

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The Death of Wilder Morris “Tuffy” Bosworth

Wilder Morris Bosworth, Jr.
Biloxi National Cemetery

 

The Daily Herald, Gulfport and Biloxi, Mississippi Coast

Saturday Afternoon – December 13, 1958

Deaths

WILDER BOSWORTH

Wilder Morris Bosworth Jr., 23, 207 Reynoir St., Biloxi, died Friday, 2:30 p.m. at St. Joseph Hospital, Elgin, Ill. He was a native of Chicago and resided in Biloxi most of his life. He was in the Navy from 1954-58, was a member of First Methodist Church, Biloxi, Biloxi Yacht Club and he and his family had been visiting in Elgin for the past week. His death followed a long illness.

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Virginia Champlin Bosworth, mother, Mrs. Helen Mason, Biloxi; father, Dr. Wm. [sic-should be Wilder] Bosworth, Columbus, Miss., and two brothers Wm. Shales Bosworth [sic-correction last name was Shales, not Bosworth], Dixon, Calif., and Frank Hunt Bosworth OCS, Fort Benning Ga., and grandfather, Thad Hogland [sic-correction Fred Hoagland], Elgin, Ill.

The body will arrive in Biloxi at 2:50 a.m. Monday. The funeral will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday from Bradford Funeral Home with services at First Methodist Church by the Rev. W. F. Whaley.

 


 

Biloxi Daily Herald

December 17, 1958

BOSWORTH RITES

The funeral of Wilder Bosworth Jr., who died Friday at Elgin, Ill., was held Tuesday afternoon from Bradford Funeral Home with services at the First Methodist Church conducted by the Rev. W. F. Whaley. Burial was in the Biloxi Cemetery. Pallbearer were Vallie Lepre, John Baltar, Keith Fountain, Franklin Middleton, Jack Perez and John Switzer.


 

Wilder Morris Bosworth, Jr. 2
Photo of Wilder Morris “Tuffy” Bosworth in my grandmother Helen Hoagland Shales Bosworth Mason’s locket. This locket is in my possession.

Wilder Morris Bosworth, Jr., was my paternal uncle. His family members called him “Tuffy”. This was a nickname I was frequently affectionately called by my mother, Janie. She told me I looked like him and reminded her of him. I was 2 ½ years old when Tuffy died. I have no memories of him. I first visited Tuffy’s grave in the Biloxi National Cemetery just a few years ago. He is buried in a beautiful spot under a sprawling live oak tree. I took photos of his grave. I was told Tuffy died from cancer that was located in his leg. I wept for the uncle I never got to know. By all accounts, Tuffy was a kind and loving person with an adventuresome nature.

Wilder Morris Tuffy Bosworth Jr
Wilder Morris “Boz” Bosworth – 1938 Biloxi High School Graduate – “Work fascinates me–in fact I can sit and watch it for hours.”

Old Biloxi Newspaper of 1876 Reviewed

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Biloxi Daily Herald

Biloxi, Mississippi, USA

September 4, 1905

—–

A PAGE OF PAST LOCAL HISTORY

“Old Biloxi Newspaper of 1876 Reviewed”

Hopes For a Constitutional Convention Expressed.

Louisiana State Lottery Prizes Won in Biloxi.

Old local newspapers are always interesting. They turn back the page of forgotten history and an intimate glance at a day that is dead.

Yesterday Mrs. H. Aken, who has spent many useful years at Biloxi and on Deer Island, showed a Herald reporter a copy of the Biloxi Mirror, published Saturday, January 1, 1876.

It is a small, five-column edition, yellow with age and torn in many places, but it brings to mind actors on the stage of activity thirty years ago, many of whom are known to the writer only by name but who in the printed page of newspaper seem to the reader to live and act again.

At the head of the editorial page appears:

FOR U. S. SENATE

COL. RODERIC SEAL

Col. Seal is also mentioned in another part of the paper. Col. R. Seal was at home for the holidays but intended returning to Washington to further prosecute his claim for his seat in congress and for the ejection of the negro John R. Lynch from the place on charges of fraud, bribary [sic} and irregularities.

We know now that Col. Seal never did succeed in having Lynch ousted but we are still firm in the faith that it should have been done.

Immense growth of the oyster industry in Biloxi was recorded. The two principal firms, Bousquet, Elmer & Maycock and Lopez & Co., were shipping one or two carloads of oysters in the shells nearly every day “besides thousands of opened ones to different portions of Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Missouri and other states.” The future of the orange exportation industry was also highly spoken of.

The editors, C. K. Browning and B. A. Reynolds, were both optimists, evidently. They took a cheerful view of the outlook for the south, Biloxi and the world in general.

The editorials breathe of hopes for “the blessingf [sic] of constitutional liberty,” for the impeachment of Ames, then governor, and for a “convention clothed with plenary power to form a constitution, securing domestic peace and fostering the blessings of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

These hopes of the editors, we are happy to say, have all come true. The carpetbagger is still down where he was placed in the election of 1875 and his seed has been rooted out of the land forever.

The paper spoke complimentarily of the Judge G. C. Chandler, then circuit judge of this district, though he was a republican, and expressed the hopes that Gov. Ames would appoint him over any other republican. It also urged the appointment of Hon. W. A. Champlin, democrat to position.

Among the local matters, Mr. Mike Keegan had just died; W. L. Williams, esq., secretary of the State Grange, had been in town; Mr. John Forelich was dead; Father Chavalier had given a supper to the Catholic church choir; several Biloxians won prizes in the Louisiana state lottery; J. E. Rivers & Co., proprietors of the St. James hotel, had given a dinner; Mr. B. Leger had been stabbed at Handsboro while acting peacemaker; a boy had been accidentally shot by a playmate; the city council, H. J. Meaut, mayor, resolved to open up Washington street and appropriated money to pay for it, the councilmen present at the meeting were P. Schaffer, V. Desporte, J. Bradford and Marshal Hurd; Capt. Sam Lawson was the newly elected justice of the peace; Rev. W. M. Jordan was pastor of the Methodist church.

There is more that might be of interest to many Biloxians, but the present is of more importance than the past, insofar as The Herald’s space is concerned, though due notice should not be neglected of the fact that the Mirror tenders thanks to Hon. J. R. Lynch for congressianal [sic} documents.

 


 

My Great Great Great grandfather was Rev. W. M. Jordan, pastor of the Methodist Church in Biloxi.