W.T. Harkness and the Peoples Bank Building of Biloxi, Mississippi – Mystery Solved!

Posted on Updated on

Interesting blog post to share. Great job by “misspreservation.com!

https://misspreservation.com/2019/06/11/who-designed-biloxis-peoples-bank/

 


My comment about the post…”W.T. Harkness’ father was J.R. (John Rankin) Harkness, an architect by education from Pelham, Massachusetts. J.R. Harkness was my Great Great Grandfather. The family was a Biloxi pioneer family who built many of the Biloxi buildings long since gone and undocumented as told to me personally by my Great Aunt Stella, J.R.’s daughter. 

Perhaps you ran across that newspaper clipping from my blog here on Word Press? I have researched and posted extensively about the Harkness family. I grew up knowing, thanks to Aunt Stella, the Harkness family built the building known as the People’s Bank. I can assure you no tantrums were at issue in this family’s history as they were instrumental in the progress of their beloved Biloxi.
My blog is The Tenderly Rose Collection. That is where that newspaper clipping was originally posted about W.T. Harkness. It had never been available until I began my documentation of the Harkness pioneers.”

Advertisements

Delta Zeta Carolers – 1974 USM Chapter

Posted on Updated on

Delta Zeta Carolers-1974 Univ. of Southern Mississippi Chapter
Delta Zeta Sorority – Univ. of Southern Mississippi Dec. 1974

Hattiesburg American

December 24, 1974

Hattiesburg, Mississippi

***

Delta Zeta Carolers

Delta Zeta sorority members take a break at the home of Mrs. C. C. Sullivan, grandmother of Delta Zeta pledge Carey Sullivan, while making their Christmas spirit count. The truck-borne chorus sang carols in many areas of the city and in return asked for donations of canned food items which were distributed to needy families in the area. The girls are, from left:

Front—Brenda Fayard, Gulfport; Carey Sullivan, Hattiesburg; Cheryl Roberts, Yazoo City; Beth Mayo, Hattiesburg, and Vicki Jones, Ft. Walton Beach, Florida.

Back—Cheryl Moffett, Fayette, Arkansas; Sandra Reynolds, Jackson; Ann Thompson, Jackson; Tenderly Estrada, Gulfport; Dianne Tyner, Corinth and Beth Stanford, Pascagoula.

(Photo by Bob Waller)


 

Delta Zeta Creed
My copy of the creed given to me when I pledged Delta Zeta Sorority at the University of Southern Mississippi in the fall of 1974.
1974 Delta Zeta Pledge Invitation Card
In the fall of 1974, I received three invitations for pledging a sorority at USM. One from Phi Mu, one from Tri Sigma (I was a legacy through my mother, Jane Morris Bosworth) and Delta Zeta. I remember the anguish of trying to decide which one to join. I decided on Delta Zeta because the young women were so fun and friendly. I was ecstatic to learn my old sandbox friend from First Baptist Church had selected DZ, too. Gosh, those were such days. DZ sisters really are forever.

Remember when ‘Pied Piper’ Was A Smashing Hit? -1968- Prodution By Gulfport Little Theatre

Posted on Updated on

The Pied Piper of Hamelin-Gulfport Little Theatre
Gulfport Little Theatre Cast of “The Pied Piper of Hamelin”

‘PIED PIPER’ IS SMASHING HIT BY GULFPORT LITTLE THEATRE

Playing to packed houses and having to turn people away at the door, 55 children under the capable direction of Mrs. James H. Baxley, brought “The Pied Piper of Hamelin” to life at the Gulfport Little Theater July 12 and 13.

The line cast consisted of Keith Dubuisson, Robert Lizand, Bobby Parker, Emilu Gauthe, Rusty Sumrall, Ronnie Lizana, Beverly Spruill, Neidre Allgood, Jim Tucker, Laurie Juliana, Pete Hamp, Nancy Ciccarelli and Mary Eliza Turner.

The rats were played by Mary Margaret Angel, Misha Andre, Linda Hill, Matt Johnson, Bert Ladner, Geoffrey Morse, Scott McManus, Michael Novak, David Rogers, Lisa Rosetti, Jeff Johnson, and Roberta McIntyre.

The children of Hamelin were Vanessa Lindsay, Don Benefield, Nancy Bernheim, Margaret Bell, Rebecca Dabbs, Donna Glancey, Carol McManus, Charlotte Throop, Karen Hill, Michelle Johnson, Kathy McManus, Lisa Pickhardt, Laura Peno, Martha Rouse, Mary Todaro, and Douglas Bell.

The townspeople were Nancy Bell, Dede Dabbs, Judy Gilbert, Susan Herman, Sheryl Ireland, Ellen Bryant, Florence Keating Derrith Allgood and Robianne Vest. The colorful set was designed by Mrs. Tom Benefield and painted by Mrs. T. N. Roberts, Mrs. H. G. O’Conor, Robert and Ronnie Lizana and Mrs. Benefield. Light and sound were handled by Chris Elam and Tracey Bradley. Costumes were coordinated by Mrs. James Gilbert and Mrs. William Ruble. Lobby decorations were done by Mrs. Dean Keating, Florence Keating, and Dede Dabbs. Theater posters were by Mrs. T. N. Roberts.

Assisting Mrs. Baxley on the production were Miss Lanee Kent, Mrs. Robert Little, Mrs. Spencer Bell, and Mrs. Raymond Lizana. Also working on the production were Miss Lucy Turner, Miss Jan Guild, Rodney Bond, Mrs. Victor Allgood, Mrs. George Rosetti, Mrs. F. A. Stainken, David Longlois, Mr. Blaine Currie, Miss Nancy McKenzie, Miss Sharon Bingham, Miss Maianne Towell, Miss Martha Shae, Miss Jeanette Alford, Mrs. Neil Andre, Mrs. Joyce Foster, Miss Amy Foster, and Miss Gayler Panania.

Helping with hospitality were Mrs. William Hall, Mrs. George Morse, Mrs Jodie Johnson, Mrs. Richard Ciccarelli, Mrs. Charles Parker, Mrs. Edward Throop, Mrs. Charles Angel, Mrs. Neil Andre, and Mrs. Robert Novak. Ticket sales were handles by Mrs. James Bell, Mrs. William Ruble and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Rogers.

—–

The Dixie Guide (Gulfport, Mississippi)

Page 13

Thursday, August 1, 1968

 

 

1967 “Little Moon” Production by Gulfport Little Theatre

Posted on Updated on

Little Moon-Gulfport Little Theatre Play
1967 “Little Moon” Gulfport Little Theatre Cast-Junior Division – (Left to Right) First row: Patricia Danne Miller, Judy Putnam, Marcia Dubuisson, Lucy Rishel, Mary Christel Puissegur, Margie Putnam, Douglas Bell, Don Barkley, Cameron Crawford, Scott Simmons, Debbie Shows. Second Row: Donna Ladner, Emi Lu Gauthe, Jennie Shows, Andi Acree, Karen Ladner, Scott Crawford, Scott Roberts, Coy Hosch, Griffin Bland, Jr., Jay Bailey, Duncan Crawford, Virginia Simpkins, Carol Lee Cunningham. Third row: Susan Boyette, Jean Dell Alfonso, Garnet Quarles, Sherree Starr, Larry Rishel, Rusty Sumrall, Lanee Kent, Lyan Roberts, Susan Elam, Susie McConnell, Elizabeth Gates, Rebecca Glascock

Once again Gulfport Little Theatre has done its part to make the summer memorable for a group of young people, under the direction of Mrs. Allen Evans, who directed “Wind in the Willows” last year nearly forty youngsters produced a play in the Chinese manner.

It is the custom of Little Theatre to use children from six through sixteen in their plays. Occasionally an exception is made to this rule and this was done this summer when Lanee Kent, capable and charming assistant to the director was given a part in the play. As the stage manager the most important person in any Chinese drama she ruled supreme over her two property boys Griffin Bland, Jr. and Duncan Crawford, who moved property pieces and changed sets with truly Oriental finesse.

Dressed all in black, which the stage manager explained made them invisible, the two boys were given a great deal of responsibility for the success of the play. Equally responsible was Little Moon herself, smart daughter of an impoverished farmer, who had never had a son and was very tired of trying to remember girls’ names.

Little Moon was Jeannie Shows, who had an important part in the 1966 play, “Wind in the Willows.” Jeannie showed a poise and flair far beyond her years and was the truly helpful child of an otherwise helpless pair of parents. Rusty Sumrall played the father, and played him with authority. Susan Elam was a timid, fearful mother given to fainting when faced with trouble, but ready to fight to defend her girls, Sheree Starr was a peppy old grandmother outspoken and amusing.

The other daughters Camilla, Lilly, Orchid, Rosebud and Daffodil were very well played by Lynn Roberts, Elizabeth Gates, Debbie Shows, Andi Acree and Lucy Rishel. Lucy’s elder brother, Larry, was the dancing tutor, a man who knew just how to handle ticklish situations. And he needed to know, for the rich man who employed him, Lee Wang, Scott Crawford’s assignment in this play, was short-tempered and demanding. Scott played the part to the hilt, and never stepped out of character. Lady Silver Song, his charming wife is Jean Dell Alfonso in real life, a very talented young lady who will be seen often on many stages, so genuine is her talent.

Jade, their daughter, was played by a newcomer to the Junior Division, Mary Christel Puissegur. Her clear voice and excellent projection made her a natural for the part, and like many another successful actress she was easy to look at, too.

The pantomime scene in which Little Moon’s plot to get jobs for her eligible sisters was outlined was cleverly played by Little Moon and Rosebud, Andi Acree, Lilly, Elizabeth Gates, Camilla, Lynn Roberts. The wicked servant, Fragrant Apple, who caused all the trouble for the four girls was Garnet Quarles, clear-spoken and sure of herself in all scenes.

The other servants, Plum, Emily Gauthe, Peach, Patricia Danne Miller, and Pear, Karen Ladner had all been in service long enough to earn the honor of having their names on their backs in colorful pictures. But First Servant, Donna Ladner and Second Servant, Don Barkly had only numbers on the backs of their identical jackets. Rebecca Glascock was an indignant cook, boss of her own kitchen and anxious to be the best cook in the land.

A charming seamstress and later a lady shopper, Virginia Simpkins looked exactly like an animated Chinese doll. Carol Lee Cunningham was pretty as one of her own flowers as she tried to sell baskets and flowers to passer by – only the best baskets “made in Japan”. Scott Roberts had a hug boa-constructor-type-snake in his yellow yellow basket, and piped him up whenever the action required. Douglas Bell, cute as a button, a jet button, in his black satin togs tried to sell silks to the rich men and found him hard to please.

Susan Boyette sold festival lanterns, and Scott Simmons set himself up in business downstage left as a sell of duck eggs. Young Cameron Crawford, grandson of famed author-actor-director- Elliott Nugent, made his first appearance on any stage as a rickshaw coolie, plaintively unsuccessful in his line of work. Two lovely little girls Margie and Judy Putnam did a butterfly dance which was dainty as its name, and three tumblers trained by Mr. and Mrs. McConnell were Coy Hosch, Marcia Dubuisson and Susie McConnell.

Jay Bailey was the boy who pretended to be naughty and hard-boiled, and who said girls were dumb, but went out of his was to take care of them. Jay was in last year’s play as a jailer, this year he made the most of his comedy part.

Backstage there were a number of young people without whom there would have been no play. Lucy Turner, Gail Bailey, Gil Bailey, Patty Woodsworth, Becky Woodworth, Chris Elam, Chris Evans, Joan Glascock, Kathy Singleton, and that youngest helper of them all, Mrs. James H. Baxley. Ruth Ann Pecoul was choreographer, and sets and costumes were designed by Frances Gordon, and made by many mothers and some friends.

—–

The Dixie Guide, Page 6, August 1967

 

 

 

Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth 1832-1908

Posted on Updated on

Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth
Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth, wife of Mayor Franklin Smith Bosworth and mother of Mayor Frank Hunt Bosworth

 

Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth

On October 17th, 1832 Sarah Emeline Hunt was born to Ward Ensign and Mary (Bascom) Hunt in Perrysburg, Cattaraugus, New York, USA. Ward Ensign Hunt was from Vermont and Mary Bascom from Massachusetts. Ward and Mary (Bascom) Hunt were very early pioneers of western New York.

Sarah’s parents had 12 children: Hiram Bascom Hunt (1818-1852), Henry Ensign Hunt (1819-1893), Rev. Ward Isaac Hunt(1820-1904), William Edwin Hunt (1822-1889), an infant-unknown name (1824-1824), Reuben Gay Hunt (1826-1861), Mary Elizabeth Hunt (1827-____), Joshua Bascom Hunt (1830-1835), George Hunt (1832-____), Sarah Emeline Hunt (1832-1908), Ellen Hunt (1834-1854) and Aaron Bascom Hunt (1837-1900).

Sarah Emeline Hunt was a teacher by training and experience. In the book “Biography of a Mind: Bosworth of Oberlin,” Sarah wrote an account of her life and in it she spoke of her mother “keeping abreast of current events. I remember her telling us that the Civil War was inevitable.” Widowed early in life, the mother was deeply religious and practically poised. “She would take me on horseback, in front or behind her,” to attend the Presbyterian church some four miles from the family farm in northwestern New York state. Sarah writes of her mother, Mary Bascom’s, influence upon her own life: “Parents should remember that in training children they are also training grandchildren indirectly.” 

In Cleveland, Cuyahoga, Ohio, Miss Hunt was a public school teacher and teacher at Collamer Academy. Later, Sarah Emeline Hunt taught at Notre Dame located in St. Joseph County, Indiana. It was there Sarah met her future husband, Franklin Smith Bosworth who was actually a student of hers. Both were of the same age at the time.

Sarah Emeline Hunt and Franklin Smith Bosworth (1832-1919) were joined in marriage Jan. 4, 1859 in Dundee, Kane County, Illinois. At that point it appears Sarah’s career in teaching ended.

In 1852, Franklin S. Bosworth was engaged in business with his uncle, Increase C. Bosworth, in Dundee.  A home tour in 1975 featured the Franklin Bosworth home at West Main and Fourth Streets in Dundee, Illinois as one of their homes of interest.

After about 20 years, Franklin and Sarah established their home in Elgin. An 1880 U. S. Census shows the couple and their daughter, Mary Abbie, along with a servant, Mary Moran, living at 37 Fulton Street. Franklin is listed on that census as a hardware merchant. Another census shows them at that home with their son, Frank Hunt Bosworth.

The Bosworths had four children: Reuben Hunt Bosworth (1859-1860), Dr. Edward Increase Bosworth (1861-1927) of Oberlin College, Mary Abbie Bosworth (1867-1942) and Frank Hunt Bosworth (1870-1919) a mayor of Elgin, Kane County, Illinois.

Sarah’s husband, Franklin S. Bosworth, held several terms as mayor of Elgin, Kane County, Illinois and her son Frank Hunt Bosworth was mayor of Elgin for one term.

In an 1877 newspaper article in the “Inter Ocean” mentioned Sarah’s membership in the Women’s Temperance Union in Kane County, Illinois.

The family attended the Congregational Church in Elgin, in which Franklin S. Bosworth held several official positions. We learn from another newspaper clipping that Sarah E. (Hunt) Bosworth, at the age of 57 years old, gave the welcoming speech at the local Baptist Church for the fifth annual meeting of The Ladies Home Missionary of the Congregational Church on May 21, 1890.

Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth passed away June 25, 1908 in Elgin, Kane County, Illinois. She is buried with her husband in Dundee Township Cemetery West in Kane County, the place they began their life together and raised their family.

——–

Respectfully submitted by Tenderly Rose Robin Melissa Bosworth, great great granddaughter of Franklin Smith and Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth – September 26, 2018


 

Sarah Emeline HUNT (1832 – 1908)
2nd great-grandmother

—–
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH I (1870 – 1919)
Son of Sarah Emeline HUNT
Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr. (1905 – 1990)
Son of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
Son of Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr.
Tenderly Rose Robin Melissa BOSWORTH
Tthe daughter of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

Illustrious Journalist, Author, Historian, Reporter and Editor, Irma Frances Dupre of Dundee, Illinois Passes Away

Posted on Updated on

Irma Frances Dupre

 

“Local historian dies”

Irma F. Dupre, author, historian, reporter and editor, passed away Saturday, April 5, 1980, in the Elgin Mental Health Center.

Miss Dupre, 89, formerly of 129 S. Second St., West Dundee, spent much of her illustrious life with the written word. She wrote the book, “The Romance of Dundee Township.” For the township’s centennial celebration. For many years, until the close of her writing career, she wrote the column, “Suburbiana” for the Cardunal Free Press. She had also worked for The Evanston newspaper, and the defunct Dundee Review. At one time she reported the news over the radio.

Miss Dupre contributed to the written history of St. James Episcopal Church of Dundee in the 1964 Parish Centennial Booklet. She wrote many press releases for various organizations, and at one time for the Dundee Township Public Library and the Dundee Township Historical Society.

She was born Oct. 10, 1890, in Dundee, the daughter of Peter F. and Lucy Blow Dupre and had lived in the Dundee area most of her life.

She was a member of the St. James Episcopal Church of Dundee and a former member of the Zonta Club and the Dundee Historical Society.

There are no immediate survivors.

She was preceded in death by her parents and a brother Rae.

Memorial services will be hel today, Wednesday, at 2 p.m. in St. James Episcopal church of Dundee, the Rev. Chester Boynton officiating.

There will be no visitation.

Cremation was in Elmlawn Crematory, Elmhurst.

Scharp-Schmidt Funeral Home, West Dundee was in charge of arrangements.

Memorials may be made in her memory to the Dundee Township Historical Society.

—–

Cardunal Free Press, 16 Apr 1980, Wed., Page 46.

 


Irma Frances Dupre (1890 – 1980)

My 1st cousin 3x removed

Lucy Flude Blow (1857 – 1950)
Mother of Irma Frances Dupre

Charles BLOW (1820 – 1919)
Father of Lucy Flude Blow

Maria Elizabeth BLOW (1854 – 1953)
Daughter of Charles BLOW

Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND (1880 – 1961)
Son of Maria Elizabeth BLOW

Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
Daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND

Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
Son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND

Tenderly Rose Robin Melissa BOSWORTH
You are the daughter of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH