Elgin Illinois Genealogy

Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth 1832-1908

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Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth
Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth, wife of Mayor Franklin Smith Bosworth and mother of Mayor Frank Hunt Bosworth

 

Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth

On October 17th, 1832 Sarah Emeline Hunt was born to Ward Ensign and Mary (Bascom) Hunt in Perrysburg, Cattaraugus, New York, USA. Ward Ensign Hunt was from Vermont and Mary Bascom from Massachusetts. Ward and Mary (Bascom) Hunt were very early pioneers of western New York.

Sarah’s parents had 12 children: Hiram Bascom Hunt (1818-1852), Henry Ensign Hunt (1819-1893), Rev. Ward Isaac Hunt(1820-1904), William Edwin Hunt (1822-1889), an infant-unknown name (1824-1824), Reuben Gay Hunt (1826-1861), Mary Elizabeth Hunt (1827-____), Joshua Bascom Hunt (1830-1835), George Hunt (1832-____), Sarah Emeline Hunt (1832-1908), Ellen Hunt (1834-1854) and Aaron Bascom Hunt (1837-1900).

Sarah Emeline Hunt was a teacher by training and experience. In the book “Biography of a Mind: Bosworth of Oberlin,” Sarah wrote an account of her life and in it she spoke of her mother “keeping abreast of current events. I remember her telling us that the Civil War was inevitable.” Widowed early in life, the mother was deeply religious and practically poised. “She would take me on horseback, in front or behind her,” to attend the Presbyterian church some four miles from the family farm in northwestern New York state. Sarah writes of her mother, Mary Bascom’s, influence upon her own life: “Parents should remember that in training children they are also training grandchildren indirectly.” 

In Cleveland, Cuyahoga, Ohio, Miss Hunt was a public school teacher and teacher at Collamer Academy. Later, Sarah Emeline Hunt taught at Notre Dame located in St. Joseph County, Indiana. It was there Sarah met her future husband, Franklin Smith Bosworth who was actually a student of hers. Both were of the same age at the time.

Sarah Emeline Hunt and Franklin Smith Bosworth (1832-1919) were joined in marriage Jan. 4, 1859 in Dundee, Kane County, Illinois. At that point it appears Sarah’s career in teaching ended.

In 1852, Franklin S. Bosworth was engaged in business with his uncle, Increase C. Bosworth, in Dundee.  A home tour in 1975 featured the Franklin Bosworth home at West Main and Fourth Streets in Dundee, Illinois as one of their homes of interest.

After about 20 years, Franklin and Sarah established their home in Elgin. An 1880 U. S. Census shows the couple and their daughter, Mary Abbie, along with a servant, Mary Moran, living at 37 Fulton Street. Franklin is listed on that census as a hardware merchant. Another census shows them at that home with their son, Frank Hunt Bosworth.

The Bosworths had four children: Reuben Hunt Bosworth (1859-1860), Dr. Edward Increase Bosworth (1861-1927) of Oberlin College, Mary Abbie Bosworth (1867-1942) and Frank Hunt Bosworth (1870-1919) a mayor of Elgin, Kane County, Illinois.

Sarah’s husband, Franklin S. Bosworth, held several terms as mayor of Elgin, Kane County, Illinois and her son Frank Hunt Bosworth was mayor of Elgin for one term.

In an 1877 newspaper article in the “Inter Ocean” mentioned Sarah’s membership in the Women’s Temperance Union in Kane County, Illinois.

The family attended the Congregational Church in Elgin, in which Franklin S. Bosworth held several official positions. We learn from another newspaper clipping that Sarah E. (Hunt) Bosworth, at the age of 57 years old, gave the welcoming speech at the local Baptist Church for the fifth annual meeting of The Ladies Home Missionary of the Congregational Church on May 21, 1890.

Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth passed away June 25, 1908 in Elgin, Kane County, Illinois. She is buried with her husband in Dundee Township Cemetery West in Kane County, the place they began their life together and raised their family.

——–

Respectfully submitted by Tenderly Rose Robin Melissa Bosworth, great great granddaughter of Franklin Smith and Sarah Emeline (Hunt) Bosworth – September 26, 2018


 

Sarah Emeline HUNT (1832 – 1908)
2nd great-grandmother

—–
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH I (1870 – 1919)
Son of Sarah Emeline HUNT
Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr. (1905 – 1990)
Son of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
Son of Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr.
Tenderly Rose Robin Melissa BOSWORTH
Tthe daughter of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

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Jane May (Hoagland) Bailey (1881 – 1986): Possunt quia posse videntur

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The Press Democrat

Santa Rosa, California

December 20, 1981

Page 21

***

20th Century woman still one who can

By Celia Ersland

***

Jane Bailey’s motto in high school was “Possunt quia posse videntur.” Loosely translated, it  means, “He who thinks he can.”

Recently, Mrs. Bailey, a resident of Martin’s Retirement Home, 3357 Hoen Ave., rounded out a century of her life. Two parties were given for the centenarian – one for her friends of the retirement home and another at the home of her daughter, Betty Schreiber of Oakmont.

The party at her daughter’s home was attended by Mrs. Bailey’s grandchildren and great grandchildren, and for this occasion, she wrote a history of her life and of her family. She was assisted by Mrs. Schreiber.

“My high school motto has proven true many times in my life for when you live in a mining camp there are many challenges. I once remember sewing up a deep gash in a miner’s hand with an ordinary needle and thread to stop the bleeding. The hard rock miner who was holding the victim’s hand for me fainted!”

Mrs. Bailey who is alert and uses only her walker when she moves about, adds, “Our graduating class was called ‘The Twentieth Century Class’ as we were the first class to graduate in Elgin (Illinois) in this century. One of the highlights of my life was playing Hermes, the lead in our class play, ‘Midsummer Night’s Dream.’” It played two nights at the Elgin Opera House and we were directed by an actor from Chicago.”

“I must not have been as great as I thought I was, for I tried out for an elocution scholarship to the University of Chicago and lost. I did win a scholarship to the University of Illinois in home economics. My father didn’t believe that girls needed a college education, but he finally let me go. So in the fall of 1902, he took me by train to Urbana, Ill. I joined Chi Omega Sorority and had a wonderful time.”

Mrs. Bailey, who has four grandchildren and eight great grandchildren, was born in Elgin on Nov. 14, 1881. Her father Samuel Hoagland had a livery stable with “matched teams and equipment for all occasions – wedding, funeral, holidays … he finally owned the Yellow Cab Taxi Co. there.”

Her mother, Maria Blow Hoagland was “only five feet tall and always full of fun.” Her grandmother, Lucy Flude Knott, came from Leicester, England at the age of 20. She and her husband, Mrs. Bailey’s grandfather, who sailed aboard a sailing vessel to America in 1848, had 10 children and lived in Dundee, Ill. Grandmother Blow advised Mrs. Bailey when she was married “not to have such a large family as she always had one baby on her lap and one under her apron.”

Grandmother Hoagland was born Celia Sears and was related to the Sear, Roebuck & Founders. Grandmother Blow had Roebuck relatives.

One of Mrs. Bailey’s “happiest childhood memories is of riding over the snow to Thanksgiving and Christmas celebrations in Dundee with the sleigh bells ringing.”

Another recollection involved her freshman year at the University of Illinois in 1902. “At my first dance I met a tall handsome Sig Alph who asked me for a dance and put his name on my dance card – and then stood me up.”

“He must have had a good alibi, as we later became engaged and were married June 5, 1906, just before Tom Bailey graduated with a bachelor of science degree in chemistry. I didn’t graduate as after two years in school we had become engaged and my father didn’t see any reason for me to continue my education.

The Bailey’s had been bitten by the mining bug and we took a job as assayer with a mining company in Silverton, Colo.

Mrs. Bailey remembers the trip to the west in 9105. Indians stood around “wrapped in blankets at the train station and she was frightened a bit by the narrow gauge railroad they rode in the Colorado mountains.

“Silverton was a rough mining town in 1905…We took up residence in a rooming house.” Later they found a furnished home and eventually had their first daughter, Mary Elizabeth. But she lived only a few days. Two years later the couple moved to Wallstreet, another Colorado mining town.

Their children, Thomas, Dorothy and Betty, were born there.

“Wallstreet was about nine miles from Boulder,” Mrs. Bailey recalls, “but it took about a half a day to make the trip by horse and buggy – lots of resting the horse, as it was a steep road. Then we moved to Boulder where Tom opened a custom assay office and Bob was born.”

During World War I and II, the Baileys were involved in volunteer work. After World War I, he sold the assay office and took up metallurgy full time. During World War II, Tom Bailey went to work for the Bureau of Mines in Washington, D. C.

Later they moved to Oxford, N. C., for a few years and eventually back to Colorado. Tom Bailey died in 1965, after almost 60 years of marriage. Mrs. Bailey lived in Colorado until three years ago, when she came to Santa Rosa to be near her one remaining child, Betty Schreiber, and Mrs. Schreiber’s husband and children.

She attributes her century of life to her forebearers.

“They say if you want to live to a ripe old age, you should choose your ancestors for longevity. My grandfather Blow lived within 10 days of his 99th birthday, and four of his children lived into their late 90s – my mother lived the longest: 99 and four months.”

She adds, “Grandfather Blow smoked a pipe most of his life – a fact which some would say should have shortened his life. When he was 95, Prince Albert Smoking Tobacco used his picture in their ad.”

Mrs. Bailey, however, has never smoked and has never fancied alcoholic beverages.

If you ask her what vices she does have, she laughs and says with a twinkle in her eye. “Oh. I’ve had many!”

Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Getting ready for her 100th birthday party
Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Centenarian needs only a walker to get around
Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Life has taught Jane Bailey-He who thinks he can
Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Mrs Bailey watches her daughter Betty Schreiber cut her birthday cake

 


 

Relationship between Jennie “Jane” May Hoagland & Robin Melissa BOSWORTH:

Jennie “Jane” May Hoagland (1881 – 1986)
2nd great-aunt

***

Maria Elizabeth BLOW (1854 – 1953)
Mother of Jennie “Jane” May Hoagland
Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND (1880 – 1961)
Son of Maria Elizabeth BLOW
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
Daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
Son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa BOSWORTH
The daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH

Dundee Pioneer Charles Blow A Hero at 94 Years Old

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Mr and Mrs Charles Blow of Dundee - 63rd Wedding Anniv
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Blow of Dundee, Illinois

 

The Rock Island Argus

July 18, 1913

Page 9

***

HUSBAND, 94, SAVES WIFE FROM FLAMES

Stairway Crashes as Aged Man Bears Helpmate Away from Burning House.

***

Muscatine, Iowa, July 18

Heroism which parallels that of genuine fiction was exhibited by Charles Blow, 94 years old, from possible death in a fire which totally destroyed the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Contriman at Fruitland yesterday.

The aged people were in the home alone at the time of the fire. They have been guests at the Contriman home for the past several weeks, coming here from their home at Elgin, Ill. Their daughter, Mrs. Contriman was out in the pasture while Mr. Contriman was in the field.

The fire was discovered by Mr. Blow just as he had descended to the kitchen preparatory toward securing his breakfast. Considerable headway has already been made by the fire, a gust of flame enveloping him as he opened the kitchen door. Staggering from the noxious fumes he pluckily made his way upstairs where his wife was dressing. The aged woman was almost prostrated by the smoke which filled the upstairs portion of the dwelling and her husband practically carried her down the flight of the stairs. The passageway was dense with smoke and the two old people were compelled to fight their way to safety blindly. Flames singed the hair of both although neither was otherwise injured.

Barely a minute after they reached fresh air, the stairway crashed in.

The home was burned to the ground in its entirety. Nothing was saved. The loss to the furniture is estimated at about $1,500, while to the dwelling about $1,2000. The house was owned by Theodore Drake, a well known Muscatine Island resident. But a small amount of insurance was carried. The dwelling had recently been remodeled but since the improvements the insurance had not been increased.

Mr. and Mrs. Contriman had made their home in Fruitland since last February coming here from Chicago.


Charles BLOW (1820 – 1919)
My 3rd great-grandfather
 
Maria Elizabeth BLOW (1854 – 1953)
daughter of Charles BLOW
 
 
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
 
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
 
Robin Melissa BOSWORTH
Me, the daughter of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH

Mr. Charles Blow and his wife, Lucy Flude Knott, are my 3x great grandparents.

 


 

Submitted by Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa Bosworth Reininger

Chicago Police Hunt Biloxi Dentist

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Chicago Daily Tribune

May 05, 2937

Page 13

*****

CHICAGO POLICE HUNT MISSING BILOXI DENTIST

*****

Wife Delays Operation and Flies Home.

Chicago police were notified last night of the disappearance of Dr. Wilder M. Bosworth, 34 years old, a Biloxi, Miss., dentist who has been missing since Sunday night when he started for Chicago by automobile to be at the bedside of his wife, who was to have had an operation in the Presbyterian hospital.

When the dentist did not appear Mrs. Bosworth had the operation postponed and flew home to Biloxi to join her two small children and aid in the search.

Finds Husband Gone.

Upon her arrival there she learned her husband had gone to visit a friend, Dr. W. C. White, in Birmingham, Ala., on Saturday and had left Dr. White’s home on Sunday and had left Dr. White’s home on Sunday evening for Chicago, saying he was going to drive all night.

Both the dentist and his wife are members of prominent Elgin families. Dr. Bosworth’s parents died a few years ago. Mrs. Bosworth is the daughter of Mrs. G. Mabel Hoagland, 225 Walnut avenue, Elgin, who said she had heard nothing from her son-in-law.

Shot in Roadhouse Gunfire.

Eight years ago Bosworth, before going into dentistry, had a narrow escape from death while entertaining a party of friends in a roadhouse on the Lincoln highway in North Aurora. He was shot and critically wounded by Emmett Lyons, moonshine crazed caddy master of the Aurora Country club.


Note:

From another newspaper clipping about this fiasco in my collection, I learned the Bosworths had moved to Biloxi from Florida a year earlier and Mrs. Bosworth was the president of a coast committee for the advancement of world peace. 

This story was picked up by the Associated Press and went nationwide. Some of the newspapers I’ve found it in are: Anniston Star of Alabama, Centralia Evening Sentinel of Illinois, Register Republic-Rockford of Illinois, Freeport Journal Standard, among others.

As reported in a 1941 Biloxi Daily Herald, a divorce suit was docketed for Wilder Morris Bosworth and Helen Hoagland Bosworth stating “Cruel and Inhuman Treatment Listed as cause for complaint”. I learned the date of their marriage from this newspaper clipping, I had searched for quite a while for that. My father Frank had listed their divorce date in his family history notes.

Biloxi Daily Herald September 4 1941 - The Divorce
Biloxi Daily Herald, September 4 1941

 


Dr. Wilder Morris Boswoth , D.D.S. and Helen Hoagland Bosworth were my grandparents.


Submitted by Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa Bosworth Reininger

Wealthy Elgin Youth Shot by Caddie Master – 1929

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Shot At Dance-Wilder M. Bosworth who was wounded by caddy master
Elgin Socialite, Wilder Morris Bosworth, son of Frank Hunt Bosworth and Bertha Amoret (Swan) Bosworth. Frank Hunt Bosworth, a coal and lumber dealer, was a past mayor of Elgin, Kane County, Illinois.

*****

Chicago Daily Tribune

April 28, 1929

Wealthy Elgin Youth Shot by Caddie Master

Wilder M. Bosworth, 26 years old, member of a wealthy Elgin family, was shot and critically wounded early this morning as he sat with a party of friends amid a crowd of dancers and diners in El Rora Inn, on the Lincoln highway, in North Aurora. Emmett Lyons, 24 years old, caddie master at the Aurora Country club, was seized as Bosworth’s assailant and locked up at Geneva.

Café Crowded with Dancers

Bosworth, with Miss Evelyn Kingsley, 24 years old of Elgin, and three couples, went to the Inn shortly before midnight. The party was seated at a table in the large room where an orchestra was playing and the dance floor was crowded. Witnesses said that Lyons, who appeared to have been drinking, was strolling among the tables chatting with other guests. Suddenly he approached the Elgin party’s table and addressed Bosworth.

“How would you like to get shot?” he is reported to have said.

Rushed to Aurora Hospital

Then without another word he drew a pistol and fired as Miss Kingsley ran screaming across the floor. The bullet struck Bosworth in the abdomen. Two deputy sheriffs, Clarence Sayre and Charles Anderson, who were in the place, dashed through the terrified crowd and seized Lyons. Bosworth was hurried to St. Joseph’s hospital in Aurora.

Bosworth is the son of the late F. H. Bosworth, coal and lumber merchant of Elgin. His uncles Henry I. and Alfred Bosworth, are retired Elgin bankers. It is believed Bosworth and Lyons were strangers.

*****

Seattle Daily Times

April 29, 1929

Seattle, Washington

Caddy Master Takes Eight Drinks and Shoots Stranger

“What Happened?” Asks Golf Club Employee When He Wakes Up in Jail; Victim Smiling When Hit by Bullet

By Associated Press

Aurora, Ill., Monday, April 29.

“Where do you want it?” asked Emmett Lyons, 25-year-old caddy master of the Aurora Country Club, pointing a revolver at Wilder M. Bosworth, 23; “in the stomach or in the head?”

Bosworth, one of a party of young men and women seated in the El Rora Inn smiled. He did not think this man he never before had seen would shoot. He was still smiling when the weapon sent a bullet into his abdomen.

Lyons awoke in jail yesterday wondering why he was there.

“I must have been pretty much under the weather to be brought here,” he said to the jailer. “What happened?”

The jailer told him that Bosworth, member of a prominent Elgin family, had been seriously wounded.

George Carbary, prosecuting Attorney of Kane County, said he would pay particular attention in the investigation to the liquor angle, but believed no liquor angle, but, believed no liquor had been sold at the inn. Lyons told arresting officers that he had eight drinks from a friend’s bottle shortly before the shooting. He carried a pistol, he said, because he sometimes acted as night watchman at the country club.

*****

Decatur Evening Herald

Monday, April 29, 1929

Decatur, Illinois

CADDIE MASTER HELD FOR SHOOTING STRANGER

AURORA—April 29—Emmett Lyons 25 caddie master awoke in jail here to be told that he had sot and probably fatally wounded another youth, a stranger to him.

The victim of the shooting Wilder M. Bosworth, 23 was reported near death with a bullet wound in his abdomen.

The shooting occurred at a dance hall. Witnesses told police that Lyons apparently intoxicated approached a table where Bosworth was seated with seven girl companions and demanded one of the girls to dance with him.

Thy ignored him and Lyons drew a gun and shot Bosworth.

*****

Sterling Daily Gazette

Friday, May 10, 1929

FORGIVING MOTHER MAY SAVE THE CADDY

AURORA, ILL—(A.P.)—A mother’s capacity to forgive may save Emmett Lyons, young caddy master, from prison.

Last April 27 Lyons shot and seriously wounded Wilder Bosworth at a dance. Bosworth was a stranger to him. Lyons was drunk for the first time in his life.

“It was the liquor, not the boy,” the mother of Bosworth told State’s Attorney George D. Carbury in asking him not to prosecute Lyons.

Bosworth is recovering from the wound.

*****

1929-05-01 Daily Register Gazette Caddie Master Held After Shooting Rich Youth 1
1929-05-01 Daily Register Gazette-Caddie Master Held After Shooting Rich Youth (Wilder M. Bosworth of Elgin, Illinois)

Elgin, Illinois, Bosworth-Hoagland Family Tree Written on Bible Page

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Bosworth-Hoagland Family Tree Written on Bible Page
My grandmother, Helen Hoaglan Shales Bosworth Mason Gave Me, Tenderly Rose, a Bible in the 1960s – This is a scrap from that Bible. It’s all I have left of the Bible. This was stuck in one of my baby books.