Harrison County, Mississippi

Stella Goes to Washington

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Biloxi Daily Herald

1 Jun 1917

Miss Stella Harkness leaves tonight for Washington, where she will attend the annual reunion of the United Confederate Veterans and Sons of Veterans.

 

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Enjoyable Garden Party at the Misses Harkness Residence

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Biloxi Daily Herald

July 24, 1928

ENJOYABLE GARDEN PARTY

Miss Stella Harkness and Miss May Harkness entertained with a garden party on Monday night at their home on West Howard avenue, for all the Harkness “kin”. Many of this large family, who live away from Biloxi, are here on visits, and furnished inspiration for this gathering which included 54 members of the family, in-laws and children, with a very few friends. Stunts, games, music and happy reminiscing made the evening pass all too quickly. Japeneze [sic] lanterns illuminated the garden where a number of seats had been arranged and punch was served throughout the evening. Delicious ice cream and cake also were served. Among those attending were Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Harkness and children from Texas, Mrs. Holston and daughter Peggy from Lynchburg, Va., Mr. and Mrs. Roy Roberts of D’lo, Miss Sadie Harkness from Jacksonville, Fla., Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Chaffee and little daughter. Miss John Harkness, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Gilligan, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Peresich and children, Dr. and Mrs. B. Z. Welch and children, Rev. J. L. Jordan, Mrs. Earl Rohrer and children from Gulfport, Miss Abbie May Harkness, Beulah Harkness, Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Wilkes, Rev. and Mrs. W. M. Sullivan and Miss Katherine Sullivan, Mrs. D. E. Morris, Miss Irene Morris and Miss Martha Morris from Mobile and Misses Stella and May Harkness.

Things Seen in Biloxi

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Biloxi Daily Herald

June 24, 1928

Main St. Methodist Church Choir Watermelon Cutting

The choir of the Main Street Methodist Church enjoyed a watermelon cutting at the home of H. B. Rickey in Bay Terrace, following choir rehearsal last Friday night. A very gay time was had by these choir members, among whom were Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Barbour, Miss Laurine Barbour, Miss Nelson, Miss Irene Morris, Miss Martha Morris, Mrs. Adams, H. B. Rush, Miss Helen Rush, Miss Stella Harkness, Miss May Harkness and Miss Naomi Lockett.


 

THINGS SEEN IN BILOXI

(Q. Q. McIntryre)

Last Friday evening the choir of the Main Street Methodist Church met for rehearsal, after which they motored out to the beautiful home of H. B. Ricky in Bay Terrace where one least sees any sort of disturbance. Soon after the arrival of the first division H. B. Rush came with a bountiful supply of luscious watermelons that would tempt a Southern darkey to spend his last nickel.

These were sliced so as to give each one a full feed. Everything was calm and serene. In fact you would have suspected nothing but perfect harmony, but such was not the case. The evidence of war were to be seen. The smoke of battle was beginning to appear. Suddenly W. L. Barbour and Mr. Rush were the victims of an attack. This they could not stand. The call to the front was made instantly. Rush, Barbour and Rickey were in line of battle, eyes distended, teeth tight, fists clenched, ready for the fray. This was met by the second line, with Miss Naomi Lockett, the Morris sisters of Mobile, who are visiting their aunts, the Misses Harkness, assisted by Miss Helen Rush who acted as spy to the enemy. The battle raged. Soon all army rules were forgotten, the borders of the battlefield were enlarged, ranks were broken, no respect for lines. It was a hand to hand fight with H. B. Rush claiming the victory in the first skirmish and retired with a look of serene satisfaction. The ammunition was the cold juicy, red meat of the watermelon. All during the long battle, Miss Stella Harkness of the post office, remained neutral and with the utmost indifference, wielded her fork steadily. Much damage was done to clothing and permanent waves, but all were forgiven and the jolly, fun loving pastor, the Rev. W. M. Sullivan, poured oil on the troubled waters, as all good preachers should, and with both sides claiming the victory, all declared Mr. Rickey to be a wonderful host and were sorry that they trampled his spacious and well kept lawn.

Frank Bosworth’s Birthday Party – 6 Years old in 1939!

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Biloxi Daily Herald

June 20, 1939

FRANK BOSWORTH’S PARTY

Frank Hunt Bosworth II son of Dr. and Mrs. W. M. Bosworth of West Howard Avenue, celebrated his sixth birthday anniversary with a party Monday afternoon. Games were played in the house and on the lawn, with punch being served throughout the afternoon by Mrs. Bosworth, assisted by Mesdames Roy Roper, Thomas Atkinson and Olga Sewell. Ice cream and cake were served following the games, with all the little guests around the beautifully decorated table, where all sang Happy Birthday to Frank, he making a wish and blowing out all six candles at once and cutting the first slice of cake. Those enjoying this party were Frank and Tuffy Bosworth, Lucille Roper, J. J. McCarthy, Gwendolyn and Kenneth Sewell, Elizabeth and Tommy Atkinson, Rosalie and Roland Bersch, Mesdames C. A. Erskin, Roland Bersch, Thomas Atkinson, Roy Roper, Olga Sewell and Mrs. Bosworth.


Relationship: My biological father.

1960’s Social Life on the Mississippi Gulf Coast

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Once the home of Millard and Helen Mason-Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA. Located on Beach Blvd, the home faces the Gulf of Mexico directly across the street from the sandy beach. Photo by Tenderly Rose 1990’s.

Before Hurricane Katrina hit the Coast, this house was located right on Highway 90 directly across the street from the Gulf of Mexico. It was on a corner. I don’t know if it survived the storm. I know it survived Hurricane Camille because this photo was taken in the 1990’s on one of my visits home. I took this photo while riding past the home when Momma was driving.

“Boots” and Helen Mason owned and operated Mason’s Interiors in downtown Biloxi in the 1950’s. Helen was an interior decorator. She was a devout Methodist having been a member of first United Methodist Church in Biloxi. Boots was a retired U. S. Marine.

Below is a photo of my grandmother, Rosie Smith Morris (from the left), Millard Ayres “Boots” Mason and my grandmother, Helen Hoagland Mason out for supper at the popular restaurant, the “White House” on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, now long gone.

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D.E. Morris Designs Motor Tractor Plow for Dantzler Foundry in 1912

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1912-10-07 Daily Herald – Gulfport, Mississippi

DISC PLOW DRAWN BY MOTOR TRACTOR

Product of the Dantzler Foundry Is Tried Out With Success and Inspected by Experts

Gulfport, October 7

A disc plow operated by a motor tractor is one of the recent products of the Dantzler Foundry and Machine Shop and was made under the supervision of D.E. Morris, general manager of that concern. This plow by actual measurement cuts a swath 6 feet wide and will with all its discs added cut 9 feet. It has been operated with success on the Bouslog tract of land in the rear of the Finley Hewes residence on East Beach. Among those seeing its operation were the immigration agents of the G. & S. I. and the L. & N. Railroads who spoke of its work as being excellent. This plow has a capacity of 12 acres per day on raw lands and more on lands already under cultivation. It cuts through root sand other minor obstructions on the land as it would through ordinary grass.

Mr. Morris, who designed and supervised the making of this big machine has ordered an Oliver Engine Gang Plow wheel he will attach to the motor tractor for experimental purposes. This plow will Cost $370, but should it do the work that is claimed for it, it will be used in conjunction with the disc.

It is believed that as the “back country” develops a demand for such plows as the Motor Tractor will be such as to justify its being manufactured here.

 


David Edmund “D.E.” MORRIS (1866 – 1934)
(My maternal great grandfather)
John Harkness MORRIS (1901 – 1965)
son of David Edmund “D.E.” MORRIS
Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013)
daughter of John Harkness MORRIS
Me – the daughter of Janie Lucille MORRIS

Thinking of Mamaw – today is her birthday…

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Rosa Ann Elizabeth Smith as a young woman. Cir. 1915. 

Photo of my grandmother as a young woman fresh out of nursing school at Rockefeller Hospital. Cir. 1915. She was born and raised in the Mississippi woods. She was the daughter of John George Smith and Mary Jane Rice of Seminary, Mississippi. Rosie was a private duty nurse and registered nurse at Kings Daughters Hospital and Gulfport Memorial Hospital. Her daughter, Jane Morris Estrada, was my mother.
BIRTH: 8 DEC 1895 • Seminary, Covington, Mississippi, USA

DEATH: 31 MAR 1984 • Gulfport, Harrison, Mississippi, USA