Hoagland Family History

Jane May (Hoagland) Bailey (1881 – 1986): Possunt quia posse videntur

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The Press Democrat

Santa Rosa, California

December 20, 1981

Page 21

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20th Century woman still one who can

By Celia Ersland

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Jane Bailey’s motto in high school was “Possunt quia posse videntur.” Loosely translated, it  means, “He who thinks he can.”

Recently, Mrs. Bailey, a resident of Martin’s Retirement Home, 3357 Hoen Ave., rounded out a century of her life. Two parties were given for the centenarian – one for her friends of the retirement home and another at the home of her daughter, Betty Schreiber of Oakmont.

The party at her daughter’s home was attended by Mrs. Bailey’s grandchildren and great grandchildren, and for this occasion, she wrote a history of her life and of her family. She was assisted by Mrs. Schreiber.

“My high school motto has proven true many times in my life for when you live in a mining camp there are many challenges. I once remember sewing up a deep gash in a miner’s hand with an ordinary needle and thread to stop the bleeding. The hard rock miner who was holding the victim’s hand for me fainted!”

Mrs. Bailey who is alert and uses only her walker when she moves about, adds, “Our graduating class was called ‘The Twentieth Century Class’ as we were the first class to graduate in Elgin (Illinois) in this century. One of the highlights of my life was playing Hermes, the lead in our class play, ‘Midsummer Night’s Dream.’” It played two nights at the Elgin Opera House and we were directed by an actor from Chicago.”

“I must not have been as great as I thought I was, for I tried out for an elocution scholarship to the University of Chicago and lost. I did win a scholarship to the University of Illinois in home economics. My father didn’t believe that girls needed a college education, but he finally let me go. So in the fall of 1902, he took me by train to Urbana, Ill. I joined Chi Omega Sorority and had a wonderful time.”

Mrs. Bailey, who has four grandchildren and eight great grandchildren, was born in Elgin on Nov. 14, 1881. Her father Samuel Hoagland had a livery stable with “matched teams and equipment for all occasions – wedding, funeral, holidays … he finally owned the Yellow Cab Taxi Co. there.”

Her mother, Maria Blow Hoagland was “only five feet tall and always full of fun.” Her grandmother, Lucy Flude Knott, came from Leicester, England at the age of 20. She and her husband, Mrs. Bailey’s grandfather, who sailed aboard a sailing vessel to America in 1848, had 10 children and lived in Dundee, Ill. Grandmother Blow advised Mrs. Bailey when she was married “not to have such a large family as she always had one baby on her lap and one under her apron.”

Grandmother Hoagland was born Celia Sears and was related to the Sear, Roebuck & Founders. Grandmother Blow had Roebuck relatives.

One of Mrs. Bailey’s “happiest childhood memories is of riding over the snow to Thanksgiving and Christmas celebrations in Dundee with the sleigh bells ringing.”

Another recollection involved her freshman year at the University of Illinois in 1902. “At my first dance I met a tall handsome Sig Alph who asked me for a dance and put his name on my dance card – and then stood me up.”

“He must have had a good alibi, as we later became engaged and were married June 5, 1906, just before Tom Bailey graduated with a bachelor of science degree in chemistry. I didn’t graduate as after two years in school we had become engaged and my father didn’t see any reason for me to continue my education.

The Bailey’s had been bitten by the mining bug and we took a job as assayer with a mining company in Silverton, Colo.

Mrs. Bailey remembers the trip to the west in 9105. Indians stood around “wrapped in blankets at the train station and she was frightened a bit by the narrow gauge railroad they rode in the Colorado mountains.

“Silverton was a rough mining town in 1905…We took up residence in a rooming house.” Later they found a furnished home and eventually had their first daughter, Mary Elizabeth. But she lived only a few days. Two years later the couple moved to Wallstreet, another Colorado mining town.

Their children, Thomas, Dorothy and Betty, were born there.

“Wallstreet was about nine miles from Boulder,” Mrs. Bailey recalls, “but it took about a half a day to make the trip by horse and buggy – lots of resting the horse, as it was a steep road. Then we moved to Boulder where Tom opened a custom assay office and Bob was born.”

During World War I and II, the Baileys were involved in volunteer work. After World War I, he sold the assay office and took up metallurgy full time. During World War II, Tom Bailey went to work for the Bureau of Mines in Washington, D. C.

Later they moved to Oxford, N. C., for a few years and eventually back to Colorado. Tom Bailey died in 1965, after almost 60 years of marriage. Mrs. Bailey lived in Colorado until three years ago, when she came to Santa Rosa to be near her one remaining child, Betty Schreiber, and Mrs. Schreiber’s husband and children.

She attributes her century of life to her forebearers.

“They say if you want to live to a ripe old age, you should choose your ancestors for longevity. My grandfather Blow lived within 10 days of his 99th birthday, and four of his children lived into their late 90s – my mother lived the longest: 99 and four months.”

She adds, “Grandfather Blow smoked a pipe most of his life – a fact which some would say should have shortened his life. When he was 95, Prince Albert Smoking Tobacco used his picture in their ad.”

Mrs. Bailey, however, has never smoked and has never fancied alcoholic beverages.

If you ask her what vices she does have, she laughs and says with a twinkle in her eye. “Oh. I’ve had many!”

Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Getting ready for her 100th birthday party
Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Centenarian needs only a walker to get around
Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Life has taught Jane Bailey-He who thinks he can
Jane Bailey-Descendent of Charles and Lucy Blow of Dundee
Mrs Bailey watches her daughter Betty Schreiber cut her birthday cake

 


 

Relationship between Jennie “Jane” May Hoagland & Robin Melissa BOSWORTH:

Jennie “Jane” May Hoagland (1881 – 1986)
2nd great-aunt

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Maria Elizabeth BLOW (1854 – 1953)
Mother of Jennie “Jane” May Hoagland
Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND (1880 – 1961)
Son of Maria Elizabeth BLOW
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
Daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
Son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa BOSWORTH
The daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH

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Irma Francis Dupre – Author and Historian – Passes Away in 1980

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Cardunal Free Press

Wednesday, April 16, 1980

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Local historian dies

Irma F. Dupre, author, historian, reporter and editor, passed away Saturday, April 5, 1980, in the Elgin Mental Health Center.

Miss Dupre, 89, formerly of 129 S. Second St., West Dundee, spent much of her illustrious life with the written word. She wrote the book, “The Romance of Dundee Township,” for the township’s centennial celebration. For many years, until the close of her writing career, she wrote the column, “Suburbiana” for the Cardunal Free Press. She had also worked for the Evanston newspaper, and the defunct Dundee Review. At one time she reported the news over the radio.

Miss Dupre contributed to the written history of St. James Episcopal Church of Dundee in the 1964 Parish Centennial Booklet. She wrote many press releases for various organizations, and at one time for the Dundee Township Public Library and the Dundee Township Historical Society.

She was born Oct. 10, 1890, in Dundee, the daughter of Peter F. and Lucy Blow Dupre and had lived in the Dundee area most of her life.

She was a member of the St. James Episcopal Church of Dundee and a former member of the Zonta Club and the Dundee Historical Society.

There are no immediate survivors.

She was preceded in death by her parents and a brother Rae.

Memorial services will be held today, Wednesday, at 2 p.m. in St. James Episcopal Church of Dundee, the Rev. Chester Boynton officiating.

There will be no visitation.

Cremation was in Elmlawn Crematory, Elmhurst.

Sharp-Schmidt Funeral Home, West Dundee was in charge of arrangements.

Memorials may be made in her memory to the Dundee Township Historical Society.

 


 

Lucy Flude Blow (1857 – )
Mother of Irma Frances Dupre
Father, Peter Stephen Dupre
Charles BLOW (1820 – 1919)
Father of Lucy Flude Blow
Maria Elizabeth BLOW (1854 – 1953)
Daughter of Charles BLOW
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
Daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1933 – )
Son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa BOSWORTH – Me
the daughter of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH

Chicago Police Hunt Biloxi Dentist

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Chicago Daily Tribune

May 05, 2937

Page 13

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CHICAGO POLICE HUNT MISSING BILOXI DENTIST

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Wife Delays Operation and Flies Home.

Chicago police were notified last night of the disappearance of Dr. Wilder M. Bosworth, 34 years old, a Biloxi, Miss., dentist who has been missing since Sunday night when he started for Chicago by automobile to be at the bedside of his wife, who was to have had an operation in the Presbyterian hospital.

When the dentist did not appear Mrs. Bosworth had the operation postponed and flew home to Biloxi to join her two small children and aid in the search.

Finds Husband Gone.

Upon her arrival there she learned her husband had gone to visit a friend, Dr. W. C. White, in Birmingham, Ala., on Saturday and had left Dr. White’s home on Sunday and had left Dr. White’s home on Sunday evening for Chicago, saying he was going to drive all night.

Both the dentist and his wife are members of prominent Elgin families. Dr. Bosworth’s parents died a few years ago. Mrs. Bosworth is the daughter of Mrs. G. Mabel Hoagland, 225 Walnut avenue, Elgin, who said she had heard nothing from her son-in-law.

Shot in Roadhouse Gunfire.

Eight years ago Bosworth, before going into dentistry, had a narrow escape from death while entertaining a party of friends in a roadhouse on the Lincoln highway in North Aurora. He was shot and critically wounded by Emmett Lyons, moonshine crazed caddy master of the Aurora Country club.


Note:

From another newspaper clipping about this fiasco in my collection, I learned the Bosworths had moved to Biloxi from Florida a year earlier and Mrs. Bosworth was the president of a coast committee for the advancement of world peace. 

This story was picked up by the Associated Press and went nationwide. Some of the newspapers I’ve found it in are: Anniston Star of Alabama, Centralia Evening Sentinel of Illinois, Register Republic-Rockford of Illinois, Freeport Journal Standard, among others.

As reported in a 1941 Biloxi Daily Herald, a divorce suit was docketed for Wilder Morris Bosworth and Helen Hoagland Bosworth stating “Cruel and Inhuman Treatment Listed as cause for complaint”. I learned the date of their marriage from this newspaper clipping, I had searched for quite a while for that. My father Frank had listed their divorce date in his family history notes.

Biloxi Daily Herald September 4 1941 - The Divorce
Biloxi Daily Herald, September 4 1941

 


Dr. Wilder Morris Boswoth , D.D.S. and Helen Hoagland Bosworth were my grandparents.


Submitted by Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa Bosworth Reininger

Elgin, Illinois, Bosworth-Hoagland Family Tree Written on Bible Page

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Bosworth-Hoagland Family Tree Written on Bible Page
My grandmother, Helen Hoaglan Shales Bosworth Mason Gave Me, Tenderly Rose, a Bible in the 1960s – This is a scrap from that Bible. It’s all I have left of the Bible. This was stuck in one of my baby books.

Celia M. Sears Hoagland, Death Notice- Nov. 9, 1889

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Elgin Every Saturday

Elgin, Kane, Illinois, USA

Celia M. Sears Hoagland, Death Notice
9 Nov 1889

Celia M., wife of Zephaniah C. Hoagland, died very suddenly at her home 186 Kimball Street, Nov. 4th, aged 64 years. Two weeks ago she had a paralytic stroke, though up to that time in good health. She was apparently recovering, when a second stroke carried her off. She came to Elgin in 1849 and has always been much respected and beloved. She leaves five children to mourn for her.


Celia Mary SEARS (1825 – 1889)

My 3rd great-grandmother

Samuel Campbell HOAGLAND (1855 – 1940)
son of Celia Mary SEARS

Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND (1880 – 1961)
son of Samuel Campbell HOAGLAND

Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND

Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND

Me – the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

Fred Judson Hoagland by Grandson Frank H. Bosworth

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Fred Judson Hoagland
by 

Grandson Frank H. Bosworth – 1985


I became first truly aware of my grandfather as a real person, when he was able to spend time with me after our 1947 Kankakee, Illinois auto accident. I’ll always remember his looking to be about 7 feet tall at my hospital bedside, standing next to my Uncle Bob Mogler. He lit a cigar and offered one to me before he thought of my age (14), looked piercingly at me, and asked if I smoked. I stated that I did not and his penetrating eyes that were kindly but seemed to see through me, he chuckled and smiled and said, “You’d better not!” He really loved my mom, my brother, and me. He later came to the Gulf Coast, Biloxi, to see us with his dogs “Taxi” and “Chevy”-a matching pair of beautiful boxers.

Remembrances of Samuel C. Hoagland by Granddaughter Helen Marie Hoagland

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Remembrances of Samuel C. Hoagland

by Granddaughter Helen Marie Hoagland

“My grandfather told me many tales about his business and I remember the Livery Stable.  When I was a child I disappointed my grandfather by not liking a beautiful Nanny Goat with yellow cart that he gave me to ride in.  I thanked him but said she smelled too bad for me to go near her.  This is just an example of his kindnesses to me, as I had asked for a goat and cart.  I believe that if I’d asked for the moon he would have tried to get it for me.  I was treated like a little queen, as he had my hats made by a milliner, had beautiful ermine fur coats tailored, and a beautiful ermine muff and neck piece.  I remember beautiful boots and shoes that he had the cobbler make for me.

We had a daily ride in his beautiful buggy, which was yellow trimmed with red and harnessed to a beautiful horse.  He had a special seat belt harness made to keep me safe, in case the horse balked or reared while we made Grandfather’s business calls.  He was amused when I would fall asleep when riding but would awaken as we drove into the stable on the wooden floor and I would then demand that we return to town to buy a treat at the candy store.  He would drive on through, the building and out, laughing as he took me to candy store.  This went on most every day.

When my aunt moved to Colorado and after he retired in 1913, he took a trip each year to visit her.  When he came home, he would take me on an imaginary train ride to the Wild West.  This was in the days of the actual Buffalo Bill Cody.  He told me of every point of interest, even the formations of the mountains – some looked like Indian heads, etc.  His tales were so vivid that I was sure I had been there.  In my second school year, I described the trip in such detail that my teacher asked my mother if I had been there.  Truly he visited Colorado with me.  While I live he lives.

During my grade school years, I visited in my grandparents’ home every Saturday it was possible.  He came home at noon just to be with me.  One of the games he always played with me was “I Spy”.  He spent a few minutes hiding dimes all over the living room, then gave me for spending money all I could find.  He would then show me where the rest of the dimes were hidden and would put those back in his pocket.  We played many games together and my favorite, even after I was married, was dominoes.  It used to amuse him if I could catch him cheating.  It seems he was always teaching me lessons through the games.

When grandfather retired in 1913, he was using 50 horses to pull his many buses, hacks, and buggies.  All was auctioned and I can remember that sale.  It was also the end of the horse and buggy days.”

 


 

Samuel Campbell HOAGLAND

1855–1940

Birth 22 Dec 1855 Elgin, Kane, Illinois, USA

Death 14 Dec 1940 Elgin, Kane, Illinois, USA


 

Samuel Campbell Hoagland was my paternal great great grandfather.

Helen Marie Hoagland was my paternal grandmother.