Bosworth Family Tree

Fred Judson Hoagland by Grandson Frank H. Bosworth

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Fred Judson Hoagland
by 

Grandson Frank H. Bosworth – 1985


I became first truly aware of my grandfather as a real person, when he was able to spend time with me after our 1947 Kankakee, Illinois auto accident. I’ll always remember his looking to be about 7 feet tall at my hospital bedside, standing net to my Uncle Bob Mogler. He lit a cigar and offered one to me before he thought of my age (14), looked piercingly at me, and asked if I smoked. I stated that I did not and his penetrating eyes that were kindly but seemed to see through me, he chuckled and smiled and said, “You’d better not!” He really loved my mom, my brother, and me. He later came to the Gulf Coast, Biloxi, to see us with his dogs “Taxi” and “Chevy”-a matching pair of beautiful boxers.

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Franklin Smith Bosworth (1832-1919)

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Franklin Smith Bosworth (1832-1919)

 

Commemorative Record, Biographies, Portraits, Kane and Kendall Counties, Illinois 2
Photo of the book Commemorative Record, Biographies, Portraits, Kane and Kendall Counties, Illinois that I found in the Milwaukee Library. The entry for Franklin Smith Bosworth is contained therein.
Franklin Smith Bosworth Entry Commemorative Record etc
Entry for Franklin Smith Bosworth in the Commemorative biographical and historical record of Kane County, Illinois

 

Franklin S. BOSWORTH – a native of Boston, Erie Co., New York, and son of Benjamin F. and Almira SMITH BOSWORTH.  The father was born in Greenfield, New York, and was the son of Alfred BOSWORTH, born in Bristol, Rhode Island, of English parentage.  Alfred came west in the fall of 1839, to Dundee, Ill. where he died in June 1861.  He followed the hatter’s trade, and later farming.  He married Olive CHILD of New York, and they had 6 children: Benjamin F., Oliver C., Increase C., Lucinda C., Mary C. wife of Harry WEED, Lucinda wife of Alfred EDWARDS and Abbie M, wife of Benj. SIMONDS; all are now deceased.      

Dr. Benjamine F. BOSWORTH the father practiced medicine til his removal to Illinois; locating in Chicago in 1856, he engaged in merchandising in that place until his removal to McHenry, Ill where he conducted a mercatile establishment until his death in Sept. 1843. (transcribers note: these dates are as given. Perhaps reversed?)His wife was the daughter of Amos SMITH, of NY.        

Franklin S. BOSWORTH, their only child, was born Dec. 17, 1832. He began merchandising in 1852, in connection with I.C. BOSWORTH, at Dundee, Ill. until June 1871, when he removed to Elgin.  There he pruchased [sic] interest in an east side hardware store, until Sept. 1883 when he sold to Metcalf and Reed.  1888 he purchased part of a coal and lumber yard – 1896 he became partners with his son Frank H. BOSWORTH.      

Jan 1859 he married Miss Sarah E. HUNT of Dundee, daughter of Ward E. and Mary HUNT, her father a native of Vermont. 4 BOSWORTH children: Reuben H., Edward, married to Bertha McCLURE of Elgin;  Mary, wife of Walter SKEELE; and Frank H. 

Mr. BOSWORTH was elected mayor of Elgin in 1880, for 2 terms. 

Biographical Record of Kane Co., Ill.S.J. Clarke Publishing Co.Chicago, Ill  1898 page 42


 

Franklin Smith Bosworth-Genealogy of the Child Childs and Childe families of the past and present in the United States and the Canadas
Franklin Smith Bosworth Entry in the Genealogy of the Child Childs and Childe families of the past and present in the United States and the Canadas book

Franklin Smith Bosworth-Kane County Illinois History
Entry for Franklin Smith Bosworth-Kane County Illinois History

Franklin Smith BOSWORTH (1832 – 1919)
2nd great-grandfather

Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1870 – 1919)
son of Franklin Smith BOSWORTH

Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
son of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH

Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.
 
Me, the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

Wilder Bosworth Ill

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Biloxi Daily Herald

Sept. 09, 1958

WILDER BOSWORTH ILL

Wilder Morris Bosworth, 23, husband of the former Virginia Champlin, and son of Mrs. W. [sic-should be Millard] A. Mason of Biloxi and Dr. Wm [sic-should be Wilder] M. Bosworth, Columbus, Miss., is in critical condition at VA Hospital, New Orleans. He completed his service in the Navy three months ago and planned to attend Perkinston Junior College.

His brother, Frank, now stationed at Ft. Jackson, S. C., awaiting shipment to Fort Benning, GA., to attend Officers Candidate School Oct. 13 is home on emergency leave and members of Wilder’s family also are in New Orleans with him.


Wilder Morris “Tuffy” Bosworth Jr. (1935 – 1958)
My Uncle
Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
father of Wilder Morris “Tuffy” Bosworth Jr.

 Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.

Me –  the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

The Death of Wilder Morris Bosworth, Jr.

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The Death of Wilder Morris “Tuffy” Bosworth

Wilder Morris Bosworth, Jr.
Biloxi National Cemetery

 

The Daily Herald, Gulfport and Biloxi, Mississippi Coast

Saturday Afternoon – December 13, 1958

Deaths

WILDER BOSWORTH

Wilder Morris Bosworth Jr., 23, 207 Reynoir St., Biloxi, died Friday, 2:30 p.m. at St. Joseph Hospital, Elgin, Ill. He was a native of Chicago and resided in Biloxi most of his life. He was in the Navy from 1954-58, was a member of First Methodist Church, Biloxi, Biloxi Yacht Club and he and his family had been visiting in Elgin for the past week. His death followed a long illness.

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Virginia Champlin Bosworth, mother, Mrs. Helen Mason, Biloxi; father, Dr. Wm. [sic-should be Wilder] Bosworth, Columbus, Miss., and two brothers Wm. Shales Bosworth [sic-correction last name was Shales, not Bosworth], Dixon, Calif., and Frank Hunt Bosworth OCS, Fort Benning Ga., and grandfather, Thad Hogland [sic-correction Fred Hoagland], Elgin, Ill.

The body will arrive in Biloxi at 2:50 a.m. Monday. The funeral will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday from Bradford Funeral Home with services at First Methodist Church by the Rev. W. F. Whaley.

 


 

Biloxi Daily Herald

December 17, 1958

BOSWORTH RITES

The funeral of Wilder Bosworth Jr., who died Friday at Elgin, Ill., was held Tuesday afternoon from Bradford Funeral Home with services at the First Methodist Church conducted by the Rev. W. F. Whaley. Burial was in the Biloxi Cemetery. Pallbearer were Vallie Lepre, John Baltar, Keith Fountain, Franklin Middleton, Jack Perez and John Switzer.


 

Wilder Morris Bosworth, Jr. 2
Photo of Wilder Morris “Tuffy” Bosworth in my grandmother Helen Hoagland Shales Bosworth Mason’s locket. This locket is in my possession.

Wilder Morris Bosworth, Jr., was my paternal uncle. His family members called him “Tuffy”. This was a nickname I was frequently affectionately called by my mother, Janie. She told me I looked like him and reminded her of him. I was 2 ½ years old when Tuffy died. I have no memories of him. I first visited Tuffy’s grave in the Biloxi National Cemetery just a few years ago. He is buried in a beautiful spot under a sprawling live oak tree. I took photos of his grave. I was told Tuffy died from cancer that was located in his leg. I wept for the uncle I never got to know. By all accounts, Tuffy was a kind and loving person with an adventuresome nature.

Wilder Morris Tuffy Bosworth Jr
Wilder Morris “Boz” Bosworth – 1938 Biloxi High School Graduate – “Work fascinates me–in fact I can sit and watch it for hours.”

A Letter from Alfred Bosworth (1773-1861) – to His Brother Hezekiah

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Alfred Bosworth’s Letter to His Brother Hezekiah

 

Alfred BOSWORTH (1773 – 1861)
4th great-grandfather
Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D. (1801 – 1843)
son of Alfred BOSWORTH
Franklin Smith BOSWORTH (1832 – 1919)
son of Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH M.D.
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1870 – 1919)
son of Franklin Smith BOSWORTH
Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
son of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.
Me

Deborah FLUDE (1800 – 1847)

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Deborah FLUDE Knott (1800 – 1847)

My 4th great-grandmother

 
Lucy Flude KNOTT (1828 – 1916)
daughter of Deborah FLUDE
 
Maria Elizabeth BLOW (1854 – 1953)
daughter of Lucy Flude KNOTT
 
Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND (1880 – 1961)
son of Maria Elizabeth BLOW
 
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
 
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
 
Me
The daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

Deborah Flude was born on October 28, 1800, in Leicester, Leicestershire, England. She was a lifelong resident who married James Knott in 1822 in Leicester, Leicestershire. They had five, maybe six, children in 13 years. Her daughter, Lucy Flude, was my 3rd great grandmother. Deborah died on May 15, 1847, in Leicester, Leicestershire, at the age of 46, and was buried there in the St. Nicholas Church cemetery. Lucy came to America and settled in Elgin, Kane, County, Illinois. She married Charles Blow. Deborah’s father, James Knott, also came to America and was married twice after Deborah’s death. He was a grocer in Elgin, Kane County, Illinois. Deborah has become one of my special ancestors I feel I have a spiritual relationship with.
Every now and then, when doing genealogy, I have experienced what I call a “Wings of Angels” moment. A connection is made with someone who helps me along the way in my journey to learn about my ancestors. This was one of those experiences that sent genealogy information “on the wings of angels” to me. I have described those times as a spiritual feeling, a bit of luck and a message from my ancestors. I began researching Deborah Flude only to find a BBC broadcaster, Tony Wadsworth and his wife had done a radio show about her. I contacted him, and ultimately he sent me a copy of the show’s presentation on a CD and a copy of her death certificate one of his researchers had given to him. I had a nice amount of correspondence with Mr. Wadsworth. He told me he passed Deborah’s grave everyday walking to work and that had cause him to question her life so long ago. He was happy to become acquainted with me because he was interested in what had become of her offspring. To learn I was a descendant in America seemed to please him very much. I enjoyed our correspondence. I’m invited to visit him if I ever make the jump across the pond. 

 

Forget Me Knott

BBC Leicester’s Tony Wadsworth goes in search of a Leicester woman who was born, married and buried in the same street. 

How often do you pass familiar buildings, statues and objects in the street without giving them a second thought?

One sunny day BBC Leicester’s Tony Wadsworth stopped to take a look round the churchyard he walks past everyday, and found one woman’s remarkable story amongst the gravestones.

It got him thinking about the area around St. Nicholas Church and how it had changed since her days in the 1800s, and even in the last 50 years.

Deborah’s Death

Deborah’s death certificate states that she died of “enlargement of the liver” and “heart disease”.

BBC Leicester’s Julie Mayer spoke to Dr Clive Harrison to find out what could have caused Deborah’s poor health…

Leicester in the mid 1800s was a very different place from the city we know today and the environment would have affected everyone’s health.

In 1813 the Inspector of Nuisances, George Brown painted the city conditions as a radical risk to the health of its residents.

He said the River Soar was “torpid and turbid”, describing parts of it as an “open cesspool” emitting “pestiferous gasses which cause disease of the most malignant and mortal character”.

Doctors of the time often didn’t understand much more about disease than their patients; miasma, the belief that illness came from bad smells, was a popular concept.

Infant mortality was particularly high with a fifth of children dying before they reached the age of one.

In the 19th Century diarrhoea, consumption, scarlet fever and lung infections were all common causes of deaths.

With people living in cramped conditions, next to cesspits, abattoirs and stables, Clive believes it’s no wonder disease was rife.

Before the time of the NHS and antibiotics, city residents would normally be treated by local doctors who used reference books to give prescriptions from their own pharmacies.

There was just one hospital in the area during the 1800’s. Leicester Infirmary was founded in 1771 but was only open to a small section of society.

Overall Dr Clive said it was unsurprisingly Deborah had died of disease and all things considered she didn’t do too badly to last until 47 years-old: “I’d have said she was almost elderly.”

Life after Deborah

Although Deborah’s grave clearly marks her marriage to James Knott, her husband and children do not rest in the same churchyard.

Peter Cousins searched the 1851 census but was unable to find their names, “Husband, children – just disappeared off the face of Leicester.”

After quite a bit of thinking and investigating Peter traced down the family’s movements after the death of Deborah.

An 1849 shipping list reveals that James Knott, his sons William and Fredrick, and daughter Elizabeth, emigrated to America.

The travelled on the Guy Mannering ship on her first East-West voyage from Liverpool to New York on 22 May 1849.

The journey to the new world and their new home took 38 days.

After digging a bit deeper Peter found the Knott’s settled in Illinois the next year, with what appears to be a young wife for James:

“So he’s not only gone to start a new life, it looks like he’s started a new family.”

St. Nicholas Church, Leicester

In Search of Deborah

BBC Leicester’s Tony Wadsworth and Julie Mayer went in search of the woman who was born and buried on the same street in Leicester…

Deborah was born in 1800 on St. Nicholas Street, which is now a continuation of the High Street – just round the corner from the BBC Leicester studios.

At that time Leicester’s population would have rested at around 17,000 people. Her particular neighbourhood was small but densely inhabited.

Her unusually modern name, which first drew Tony to her story, was passed on from her older sister who died in infancy just a year before her arrival in the world.

She married James Knott in 1822 at St. Nicholas Church, at the age of 22. Find out more about marriage in the 1800s…

Weddings at this time would have been simple and quiet affairs, with just a few close family members witnessing their solemnisation of matrimony.

Local Historian Richard Gill commented, “this notion that we have to have 150 guests at your wedding and you have a huge slap up meal afterwards, that is actually middle to late 20th Century.

“It didn’t happen for my parents in the 1920s.”

A Different Life

Deborah continued to live with her husband on the same road she grew up on, raising six children in the process.

Local genealogist Peter Cousins discovered that at the time of the 1841 Census the children ranged from between three and 16 years-old:

“They were quite regular in their habits, you might say!”

James worked as a shoemaker, which was a common profession in an area home to many shoe factories, however Mrs Knott is likely to have been a housewife.

It is difficult to know how comfortably the Knotts lived as James’ specific position is unknown and could range from business owner to manual worker.

However Richard believes there may be some clues to the family’s wealth in Deborah’s gravestone – a smart but not overly elaborate piece made from local Swithland slate:

“This would rather suggest that there was at least sufficient money to memorialise her when she died.”

Deborah’s life in the 1800s would have been a very different experience to the Leicester women of today.

There were no aeroplanes, no electric light bulbs, no phones, no water pipes delivering fresh water, no flushing toilets, no NHS, and definitely no television or radio!

Leicester: 1800s

With the St. Nicholas area now home to several car parks and a developing park and ride scheme it is particularly interesting to consider that Deborah would have never seen a motor vehicle.

Very few areas of Leicester would still be recognisable to Deborah now, including the Guildhall, five medieval churches, a few chapels, the City Rooms, and a small network of streets south of St. Martins.

Richard said, “In the period in which she lived, that first half of the 19th Century, Leicester was very different and the sort of Leicester we think of as Victorian Leicester came more or less as was dying. So very little survives.”

Deborah died on 15 May 1847 at the age of 47 and was buried in the grounds of St. Nicholas Church in Leicester, where she remains to this day.

It may seem young to us now, but Richard believes it wouldn’t have been at all shocking in the 1840s:

“No drains, no deposal sewage, clean water uncertain – so one was pray to all kinds of things.

“And medicine was really just a case of nursing people, no antibiotics or anything like that, and often the flus in the winter and summer diarrhoea carried people off.

“So it may well be some people thought, ‘well she might have lived longer’, but 47 wasn’t bad.”

last updated: 04/09/2009 at 09:34

created: 07/07/2009

BBC


 

The story about Deborah as documented by Tony Wadsworth can be heard by clicking on this link and following the links within the story:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/leicester/content/articles/2009/07/07/deborah_knott_feature.shtml

 

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