Biloxi Catholic

Chicago Police Hunt Biloxi Dentist

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Chicago Daily Tribune

May 05, 2937

Page 13

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CHICAGO POLICE HUNT MISSING BILOXI DENTIST

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Wife Delays Operation and Flies Home.

Chicago police were notified last night of the disappearance of Dr. Wilder M. Bosworth, 34 years old, a Biloxi, Miss., dentist who has been missing since Sunday night when he started for Chicago by automobile to be at the bedside of his wife, who was to have had an operation in the Presbyterian hospital.

When the dentist did not appear Mrs. Bosworth had the operation postponed and flew home to Biloxi to join her two small children and aid in the search.

Finds Husband Gone.

Upon her arrival there she learned her husband had gone to visit a friend, Dr. W. C. White, in Birmingham, Ala., on Saturday and had left Dr. White’s home on Sunday and had left Dr. White’s home on Sunday evening for Chicago, saying he was going to drive all night.

Both the dentist and his wife are members of prominent Elgin families. Dr. Bosworth’s parents died a few years ago. Mrs. Bosworth is the daughter of Mrs. G. Mabel Hoagland, 225 Walnut avenue, Elgin, who said she had heard nothing from her son-in-law.

Shot in Roadhouse Gunfire.

Eight years ago Bosworth, before going into dentistry, had a narrow escape from death while entertaining a party of friends in a roadhouse on the Lincoln highway in North Aurora. He was shot and critically wounded by Emmett Lyons, moonshine crazed caddy master of the Aurora Country club.


Note:

From another newspaper clipping about this fiasco in my collection, I learned the Bosworths had moved to Biloxi from Florida a year earlier and Mrs. Bosworth was the president of a coast committee for the advancement of world peace. 

This story was picked up by the Associated Press and went nationwide. Some of the newspapers I’ve found it in are: Anniston Star of Alabama, Centralia Evening Sentinel of Illinois, Register Republic-Rockford of Illinois, Freeport Journal Standard, among others.

As reported in a 1941 Biloxi Daily Herald, a divorce suit was docketed for Wilder Morris Bosworth and Helen Hoagland Bosworth stating “Cruel and Inhuman Treatment Listed as cause for complaint”. I learned the date of their marriage from this newspaper clipping, I had searched for quite a while for that. My father Frank had listed their divorce date in his family history notes.

Biloxi Daily Herald September 4 1941 - The Divorce
Biloxi Daily Herald, September 4 1941

 


Dr. Wilder Morris Boswoth , D.D.S. and Helen Hoagland Bosworth were my grandparents.


Submitted by Tenderly Rose-Robin Melissa Bosworth Reininger

Miss Clara Lopez, Biloxi Socialite, Dies January 26, 1895

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Clara Lopez 1875-1895 of Biloxi, Mississippi
Photo Credit to Sue Giamo, descendant of the Biloxi Dulion/Lopez Family

 

January 26, 1895
The Daily Herald
Biloxi, Mississippi
—–

OBITUARY.

“God doth His own in safety keep, ‘He giveth His beloveth sleep.’”

Miss Clara Lopez, who departed this life last Sunday morning, in Asheville, No. C., to which place she had gone for the benefit of her health was the third daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. Lopez, of this city.

Miss Clara was one of Biloxi’s most charming young ladies. She was universally popular, and “to know her was to love her.” Her “passing away into that great beyond” has plunged many hearts into deepest grief. She was in her twentieth year—just entering upon womanhood—when that “Reaper, whose name is Death,” came “with his sickle keen,’ for the brightest and best of earth’s flowers.

“’My Lord has need of these flowerets gay,’
The Reaper said, and smiled,
‘Dear tokens of the earth are the, Where He was once a child.’”
And so he bereft an earthly home, this fair blossom so brightly adorned, that she might be transplanted “in fields of light”—“God’s own garden spot.”
For “not in cruelty, not in wrath,
The Reaper came that day,
‘Twas an angel visited the green earth
And took the flower away.”

Miss Clara was richly endowed with pleasing attributes of both mind and body—beauty of form and face, a clear, quick intellect, amiable disposition and Winning manners—and was quite a favorite in the social circles in which she moved, and, though God has called her into that “perfect rest for the soul,” away from parents and friends, away from sight and sound, she yet makes glad the “dear old halls of memory,” and—

“To live in hearts we leave behind
Is not to die.”
‘Ther is no death. The stars go down
To rise upon some fairer shore;
And bright in Heaven’s jeweled crown
They shine forevermore.
“There is no death. An angel form
Walks o’er the earth with silent tread
He takes our best loved things away
And then we call them ‘dead.’
“And when he sees a smile too bright,
A heart too pure for taint or vice,
He bears it to that world of light
To dwell in Paradise.”

The remains of the deceased were interred in the Biloxi cemetery last Tuesday evening. The funeral cortege moved on foot from the Lopez residence to the Catholic church, of which Miss Clara was a member, where appropriate services were held by Rev. Father Blanc. About a thousand people were in attendance at this sad ceremony. A number of young ladies, of the society of the Children of Mary, walked beside the bier of their former comrade, attired in “garments of pure shite.” The pall bearers were Messrs. Wm. Wachenfeld, Wm. T. Harkness, Emile Barre, Wm. Cousans, Henry Clark and Louis Harvey.

To the sorrowing parents, sisters, brothers and other relatives of the deceased, the Herald offers its sincere sympathy. “She is not dead, but sleepeth.”



The Harkness Family and the Lopez/Dulion Families were family and friends back in the old days. Two of their descendants are friends today even though we live far away from Biloxi – me and Sue Giamo.