U.S. Navy

Wilder Bosworth Ill

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Biloxi Daily Herald

Sept. 09, 1958

WILDER BOSWORTH ILL

Wilder Morris Bosworth, 23, husband of the former Virginia Champlin, and son of Mrs. W. [sic-should be Millard] A. Mason of Biloxi and Dr. Wm [sic-should be Wilder] M. Bosworth, Columbus, Miss., is in critical condition at VA Hospital, New Orleans. He completed his service in the Navy three months ago and planned to attend Perkinston Junior College.

His brother, Frank, now stationed at Ft. Jackson, S. C., awaiting shipment to Fort Benning, GA., to attend Officers Candidate School Oct. 13 is home on emergency leave and members of Wilder’s family also are in New Orleans with him.


Wilder Morris “Tuffy” Bosworth Jr. (1935 – 1958)
My Uncle
Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
father of Wilder Morris “Tuffy” Bosworth Jr.

 Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.

Me –  the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

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Gulfport Pioneer James W. Bradley’s son Dies by Drowning in Service on U. S. S. Ranger in 1921

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Daily Herald – Gulfport, MS-Date approx. Aug. 1921

JAMES BRADLEY, POPULAR GULFPORT YOUTH DROWNS

The many friends of Mrs. James Bradley will regret to learn that she has received a telegram from the department in Washington stating that her son, James has been drowned in Porto Rico. James was one of Gulfport’s well known boys and went away on the Ranger, a government survey boat only a few weeks ago. Mrs. Bradley has the sympathy of the entire community in her bereavement. James was the only child. The telegram received reads as follows:

Washington, D. C. August 30, 1921.

Mrs. James Bradley, Gulfport, Miss.

Regret exceedingly to state that word has been received that your son James was drowned in Porto Rico. No details received. Request you to inform me if you desire to have body shipped there or buried in Porto Rico.

                                                      Signed. WILLIAM BOWIE, Acting Director Coast Survey.


 

Daily Herald – Gulfport, MS-Date approx. Sept. 1921

TO BURY BRADLEY THIS AFTERNOON

Body Brought Back to Gulfport Wrapped in Beautiful Folds of His Country’s Flag.

Five weeks ago the community was shocked and grieved when Mrs. J.W. Bradley received notice that her son, James had been accidentally drowned at Porto Rico. Yesterday the remains reached Gulfport on the 1 p.m. train from New Orleans, and another of the town’s own boys had come home, for his final rest, his casket wrapped in the beautiful folds of his country’s flag, in whose service he had died.

James Bradley came to Gulfport at the age of one year with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James W. Bradley. He received the greater part of his education in the city schools, but graduated from the county high school at Perkinston with the class of 1918. Young Bradley joined the navy and saw over a year’s service in the Pacific fleet aboard the battleship Texas. At the time of his death he was in service on the U. S. survey boat Ranger, his last visit home was in May when he had a short furlough.

James Bradley was a bright ambitious boy, generous and kindly of disposition, and was popular with young and old alike. His father, the late James W. Bradley was one of the beloved pioneers of Gulfport and at his death three years ago, was serving a second term as city commissioner. His mother is beloved by the whole community whom she serves so efficiently as librarian at the Carnegie Library.

The funeral services will be conducted by the pastor of the First Methodist Church, Rev. Mr. Linfield, of whose church the young man was a member, assisted by Drs. Grace and Mahoney of the Baptist Church. The funeral will be held from the residence of Mrs. J.W. Rankin a sister of Mrs. Bradley whose house was almost a second home to James, as these devoted sisters have lived side by side for many years. The pallbearers are Messrs. B. Havard, John Morris, Roger Williams, Vassar Anderson, J.L. Heiss, Drs. A.F. Carraway and Dr. OC. Harper and Dr, Arvah Hopkins.Interment will be made in Evergreen Cemetary, where some 13 years ago the first grave to be opened in this beautiful cemetery received the body of a younger brother of the deceased.

Among the many letters of sympathy which have reached Mrs. Bradley none have been a greater solace to her than the following sent her by the crew of the Ranger.

S. S. Ranger, San Juan, P. R., Sept. 22, 1921

My dear Mrs. Bradley:

It is indeed hard for us to express our sympathy in your bereavement. We only know your son as a comrade and can only miss his alert, generous and his good qualities and infectious good nature. To a mother, he must ever seem as a boy and his good qualities which gained him popularity among his fellow men are ever subordinate to mother love.

The circumstances surrounding the drowning only serve to make us feel how close we all are to the dividing line. The ship was at anchor in the harbor, a short distance off shore. James and another man were engaged in running a launch between the landing and the ship. On the midnight trip, the launch remained at the landing for a few minutes; James in company with another went up the street a short distance to a restaurant. They failed to return in time before the launch returned to the ship, but nothing was thought of the matter as there were a couple of small boats at the landing used by sailors returning to their ships. In about three quarters of an hour after the launch left James and his companion returned to the landing, but the boats which were present before were gone. The two men separated to look for boats at other landings. When James’ companion returned to the original landing, James was not there. However as a shower of rain had just passed it was assumed that he had been able to find a boat and returned to the ship.

When it was found that James was not aboard a search in town was made. About ten o’clock in the morning that body was observed by some boys in swimming. As he was wearing only his underclothing when recovered, his only other garment having been a pair of trousers, it is believed he endeavored to swim to the ship.

The entire crew unite in expressing their sympathy. Many of them have been his boyhood friends and all of us have been attracted by his personality while he was among us. As it is impossible to acknowledge our feelings in person we hope that this letter may convey in some measure our sincerest sympathy.

Signed by:

Executive Officer, Chief Engineer, Boatswain, Carpenter, Assistant Engineer, Fireman, Seaman, Seaman.


 

I found these news articles while researching my great grandfather’s life in print. My great grandfather, David Edmund “D.E.” Morris, was in service on the U. S. S. Ranger as the Chief Engineer when this tragic accident occurred. His son, my grandfather John Harkness Morris is listed as a pallbearer in the news article. I knew a small amount about this story as told by my grandmother, John Morris’ wife, Rosie, when I was just a child. She would tell me the tale as we visited the graves in our family plot in Evergreen Cemetery. We walked over to James Bradley’s grave a time or two and she described the drowning and how the men had recovered the body of James. She was close to my great grandfather, D.E. So, now upon reading this article, I assume she was told the story by him. She was always sad when she spoke of the story. I wondered if she was friends with Mrs. Bradley. I knew when I found this article exactly who James Bradley was in relation to my family. The Bradley boys’ graves are not far from my family’s plot at Evergreen cemetery where my grandmother, grandfather and great grandfather, D.E. Morris are buried. Below is a photo of D.E. Morris in Puerto Rico – he’s the one in the middle.

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cir 1920 – David Edmund Morris, Chief Engineer, USS Ranger. David Edmund Morris is the officer in the middle of the photo.

Judge John Smith “Johnny” Morris

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Judge John Smith “Johnny” Morris, Gulfport, Harrison, Mississippi, USA – Harrison County Chancery Court Judge

Honoring my Uncle Johnny – The Honorable John Smith “Johnny” Morris 1925-1991, Gulfport, Harrison, Mississippi. Father’s Day has come and gone, but, I always remember all the cards and presents I made for him when I was growing up. When I was a little girl, he was there for me as a father figure even though he never had any children born to him. He was married to Roma June Gentry, my dear Aunt June.

As kids we always had to shout, “Here comes the judge, here comes the judge, court be quiet ’cause here comes the judge” whenever he came to visit… we’d all laugh!

When Hon. John “Johnny” Smith Morris was born on October 11, 1925, in Gulfport, Mississippi, his father, John, was 24 and his mother, Rosa, was 29. He married Roma June Gentry on December 1, 1953, in his hometown. He died on November 4, 1991, in Gulfport, Mississippi, at the age of 66, and was buried in Biloxi, Mississippi at the Veteran’s Cemetery.

Hon. John “Johnny” Smith Morris (1925 – 1991)
uncle
 
John Harkness MORRIS (1901 – 1965)
father of Hon. John “Johnny” Smith Morris
 
Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013)
daughter of John Harkness MORRIS
 
Me
the daughter of Janie Lucille MORRIS

Hon. John “Johnny” Smith Morris served in the military about 1943, when he was 18 years old. US Navy Enlistment-Uncle Johnny lied about his age to enlist early. He lost a leg soon afterward during a conflict overseas somewhere. I really don’t know much at this point about his military career, although, I do plan to research more as time permits. I was told by my grandmother Uncle Johnny lost his leg before he was of age to enlist, but, had joined without his parent’s permission and she didn’t know about it until it was too late.

Uncle Johnny proudly attended Mississippi State University and remained a dedicated football fan for “Ole Miss” all his life. He loved watching football games at home in Bayou View, just off Pass Road.

I remember Uncle Johnny wanting to learn to play electric guitar. He had one he stored at his home. He gave me his book about how to play the ukulele, which he had apparently learned to play in the military. I still have the book.

Uncle Johnny graduated with a B.S. Finance/School of Business and Finance at Ole Miss. In 1962, he returned to Ole Miss to complete a masters degree in law.

He offered to send me to the Ringling School of Art in Florida because he recognized my talent and passion for art. I did not take him up on the offer. I wish I had. Both Uncle Johnny and Aunt June bought clothes and shoes for me when I needed them in junior high and high school, even college. They were supportive of me and I spent much time with them. I helped Uncle Johnny on the campaign trail handing out his cards and information, talking to voters and attending rallies with him.


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Judge Johnny S. Morris, Gulfport, Harrison County, Mississippi
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Judge Johnny S. Morris, Gulfport, Harrison County, Mississippi
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Copy of a photo of Uncle Johnny being sworn in. (Judge Johnny S. Morris, Gulfport, Harrison County, Mississippi) – my grandmother used to tease that he was being sworn at.
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Back of card – Judge Johnny S. Morris, Gulfport, Harrison County, Mississippi
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Front of card – Judge Johnny S. Morris, Gulfport, Harrison County, Mississippi from the scrapbook of T.Rose, his niece.
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Judge Johnny S. Morris, Gulfport, Harrison County, Mississippi – from his neice T.Rose’s scrapbook
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Judge Johnny S. Morris, Gulfport, Harrison County, Mississippi burial at the Biloxi Veteran’s Cemetery alongside his wife Roma June Gentry Morris.