Miss Clara Lopez, Biloxi Socialite, Dies January 26, 1895

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Clara Lopez 1875-1895 of Biloxi, Mississippi
Photo Credit to Sue Giamo, descendant of the Biloxi Dulion/Lopez Family

 

January 26, 1895
The Daily Herald
Biloxi, Mississippi
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OBITUARY.

“God doth His own in safety keep, ‘He giveth His beloveth sleep.’”

Miss Clara Lopez, who departed this life last Sunday morning, in Asheville, No. C., to which place she had gone for the benefit of her health was the third daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. Lopez, of this city.

Miss Clara was one of Biloxi’s most charming young ladies. She was universally popular, and “to know her was to love her.” Her “passing away into that great beyond” has plunged many hearts into deepest grief. She was in her twentieth year—just entering upon womanhood—when that “Reaper, whose name is Death,” came “with his sickle keen,’ for the brightest and best of earth’s flowers.

“’My Lord has need of these flowerets gay,’
The Reaper said, and smiled,
‘Dear tokens of the earth are the, Where He was once a child.’”
And so he bereft an earthly home, this fair blossom so brightly adorned, that she might be transplanted “in fields of light”—“God’s own garden spot.”
For “not in cruelty, not in wrath,
The Reaper came that day,
‘Twas an angel visited the green earth
And took the flower away.”

Miss Clara was richly endowed with pleasing attributes of both mind and body—beauty of form and face, a clear, quick intellect, amiable disposition and Winning manners—and was quite a favorite in the social circles in which she moved, and, though God has called her into that “perfect rest for the soul,” away from parents and friends, away from sight and sound, she yet makes glad the “dear old halls of memory,” and—

“To live in hearts we leave behind
Is not to die.”
‘Ther is no death. The stars go down
To rise upon some fairer shore;
And bright in Heaven’s jeweled crown
They shine forevermore.
“There is no death. An angel form
Walks o’er the earth with silent tread
He takes our best loved things away
And then we call them ‘dead.’
“And when he sees a smile too bright,
A heart too pure for taint or vice,
He bears it to that world of light
To dwell in Paradise.”

The remains of the deceased were interred in the Biloxi cemetery last Tuesday evening. The funeral cortege moved on foot from the Lopez residence to the Catholic church, of which Miss Clara was a member, where appropriate services were held by Rev. Father Blanc. About a thousand people were in attendance at this sad ceremony. A number of young ladies, of the society of the Children of Mary, walked beside the bier of their former comrade, attired in “garments of pure shite.” The pall bearers were Messrs. Wm. Wachenfeld, Wm. T. Harkness, Emile Barre, Wm. Cousans, Henry Clark and Louis Harvey.

To the sorrowing parents, sisters, brothers and other relatives of the deceased, the Herald offers its sincere sympathy. “She is not dead, but sleepeth.”



The Harkness Family and the Lopez/Dulion Families were family and friends back in the old days. Two of their descendants are friends today even though we live far away from Biloxi – me and Sue Giamo. 



 

John R. Harkness Contract for Corner Building of Lameuse and Pass Christian Streets in Biloxi 1893

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January 14, 1893
The Daily Herald
Biloxi, Mississippi
—-

Excerpts from:
LOCAL HAPPENINGS

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“If the gentleman who lost his upper teeth under the Herald office stairway, during the holidays, will pay for this notice he can recover the lost property by calling on Pete DeJean, at Little Gem saloon, who has the aforesaid teeth in his possession.”


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“John R. Harkness, the old reliable builder has the contract fort he erection of a two story building on the corner of Lameuse and Pass Christian streets, which, when completed, will be occupied by Mr. Herbelin, who has recently moved here with his family from Covington, La.”


 

John R. Harkness was my maternal great great grandfather.

Alfred Bosworth of Milton, Saratoga, New York – Hat Business Advertisement from 1794

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Alfred Bosworth Carries The Hatting Business
Hat Manufactory – Alfred Bosworth – Milton, Saratoga, New York – June 12, 1798

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Martha M (Park) Wright 1826-1909

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Martha M Park Wright 1826-1909
Martha M Park Wright 1826-1909, Moss Point, Mississippi

 

When Martha M. (Park) was born on June 17, 1826, in Athens, Georgia, her father was Baptist Park and her mother was Frances. She married James P. Wright in 1845 in Jackson, Butts, Georgia when she was 19 years old. They had one child, Frances M. “Fanny” during their marriage.

In 1840, when Martha was 14 years old, her mother, Frances “Fanny” (Chandler) Park, died. 

In 1845, Martha married James P. Wright. She was 19 years old. January 8, 1845 brought Martha a daughter in Georgia whom she named Frances “Fanny”.

According to an 1850 Census: Martha lived in Jackson,  Butts County, Georgia – Subdivision 45. The census lists Baptist Park 50 as a farmer, Martha M. Wright 22, Frances V. Parks 20, Nancy C. Parks 18, Frances M. Wright 5.
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Elgin, Illinois, Bosworth-Hoagland Family Tree Written on Bible Page

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Bosworth-Hoagland Family Tree Written on Bible Page
My grandmother, Helen Hoaglan Shales Bosworth Mason Gave Me, Tenderly Rose, a Bible in the 1960s – This is a scrap from that Bible. It’s all I have left of the Bible. This was stuck in one of my baby books.