Celia Mary (Sears) Hoagland 1825–1889

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Celia Mary (Sears) Hoagland 1825–1889

When Celia Mary Sears was born on March 31, 1825, in Dryden, New York, her father, William, was 28 and her mother, Susan, was 25. She married Zephaniah Campbell Hoagland on January 18, 1844, in Steuben County, New York. They had nine children in 20 years. She died on November 4, 1889, in Elgin, Illinois, at the age of 64, and was buried there.

She was my great great grandmother.

 


 

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Excerpt from The Bosworth Family History by Frank Hunt Bosworth II – information was incomplete when I received this history about Celia. I have researched much from that time to today.

 

Celia M. Sears-Daughter of William Richard Sears and Susan Gilbert: Celia M. Sears was the daughter of William Richard Sears and Susan Gilbert born 31 Mar 1825 in Howard, Steuben, New York, USA and died 4 Nov 1889 in Elgin, Kane, Illinois. She married Zephaniah C. Hoagland. Susan Gilbert was buried in Elgin in the Hoagland family plot. I have been working with other researchers of the Sears family and feel Celia is a sister to James, Charity, Bradford, Serena and John. She was somehow inadvertently missed in some genealogical information that is available on the internet.

Celia is the aunt of Richard Warren Sears 1863–1914, my 1st cousin 4x removed. He was a founder of Sears Roebuck and Company.

 


Celia Mary SEARS (1825 – 1889)
3rd great-grandmother
—–
Samuel Campbell HOAGLAND (1855 – 1940)
son of Celia Mary SEARS
 
Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND (1880 – 1961)
son of Samuel Campbell HOAGLAND
 
Helen Marie HOAGLAND (1907 – 1965)
daughter of Frederick Judson “Fred” HOAGLAND
 
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Helen Marie HOAGLAND
Me
the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

 

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Note from Family History by Celia M. Sears Hoagland – Mentions Ward L. Hoagland, Zeph’s brother and W. Richard Sears, Celia’s father.
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Excerpt from Celia Sears Hoagland’s Will
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Children of Zephaniah Hoagland/Celia M. Sears The Hoagland Family in America Excerpt

 

Celia Sears Hoagland-Elgin Every Saturday 9 Nov 1889
Celia Sears Hoagland Obituary – Elgin Every Saturday – 9 Nov 1889

 

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Bluff City Cemetery – Celia M. Hoagland is listed on this document for Bluff City Cemetery in Elgin, IL. The Mary listed as interred in 1990 is actually Mary Wells Hoagland, 2nd wife of Fred Hoagland. Susan Sears is Celia’s mother, Susan Gilbert.
First Congregational Church Elgin
First Congregational Church, Elgin, Illinois post card. Celia (Sears) Hoagland was a member of this church.

 

Note: On Ancestry.com – Someone has added Zeph to their family tree for the husband of Clarinda Griffith. This is absolutely not accurate. He was married once, and it was not to Clarinda Griffith. All the documentation and sources I have found through extensive research evidences the fact that Zephaniah Hoagland was married only once in his life and that is to Celia, whom he is buried next to.

 

Mary Celia Sears
Celia Mary (Sears) Hoagland Pedigree

Remembrances of Samuel C. Hoagland by Granddaughter Helen Marie Hoagland

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Remembrances of Samuel C. Hoagland

by Granddaughter Helen Marie Hoagland

“My grandfather told me many tales about his business and I remember the Livery Stable.  When I was a child I disappointed my grandfather by not liking a beautiful Nanny Goat with yellow cart that he gave me to ride in.  I thanked him but said she smelled too bad for me to go near her.  This is just an example of his kindnesses to me, as I had asked for a goat and cart.  I believe that if I’d asked for the moon he would have tried to get it for me.  I was treated like a little queen, as he had my hats made by a milliner, had beautiful ermine fur coats tailored, and a beautiful ermine muff and neck piece.  I remember beautiful boots and shoes that he had the cobbler make for me.

We had a daily ride in his beautiful buggy, which was yellow trimmed with red and harnessed to a beautiful horse.  He had a special seat belt harness made to keep me safe, in case the horse balked or reared while we made Grandfather’s business calls.  He was amused when I would fall asleep when riding but would awaken as we drove into the stable on the wooden floor and I would then demand that we return to town to buy a treat at the candy store.  He would drive on through, the building and out, laughing as he took me to candy store.  This went on most every day.

When my aunt moved to Colorado and after he retired in 1913, he took a trip each year to visit her.  When he came home, he would take me on an imaginary train ride to the Wild West.  This was in the days of the actual Buffalo Bill Cody.  He told me of every point of interest, even the formations of the mountains – some looked like Indian heads, etc.  His tales were so vivid that I was sure I had been there.  In my second school year, I described the trip in such detail that my teacher asked my mother if I had been there.  Truly he visited Colorado with me.  While I live he lives.

During my grade school years, I visited in my grandparents’ home every Saturday it was possible.  He came home at noon just to be with me.  One of the games he always played with me was “I Spy”.  He spent a few minutes hiding dimes all over the living room, then gave me for spending money all I could find.  He would then show me where the rest of the dimes were hidden and would put those back in his pocket.  We played many games together and my favorite, even after I was married, was dominoes.  It used to amuse him if I could catch him cheating.  It seems he was always teaching me lessons through the games.

When grandfather retired in 1913, he was using 50 horses to pull his many buses, hacks, and buggies.  All was auctioned and I can remember that sale.  It was also the end of the horse and buggy days.”

 


 

Samuel Campbell HOAGLAND

1855–1940

Birth 22 Dec 1855 Elgin, Kane, Illinois, USA

Death 14 Dec 1940 Elgin, Kane, Illinois, USA


 

Samuel Campbell Hoagland was my paternal great great grandfather.

Helen Marie Hoagland was my paternal grandmother.

 

John Mosiman 1931-2012

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John Mosiman bore a strong family resemblance to both of his biological parents and brothers.

John Mosiman

1931–2012

 John Mosiman was an uncle I never met and did not know much of anything about until I began my family history research. It broke my heart to know I had an uncle I never knew and cousins I never knew living in Texas. I had no other cousins or uncles on my father’s side of the family tree. I reached out to John Mosiman in the final years of his life, when I finally located him. I thought my father would be overjoyed to be in touch with John as he had mentioned him in a kind a loving way. I thought John would be happy to connect with my father, but, I think maybe my reaching out to him via e-mail was a great shock to him. I’ve saved those e-mails. They mean the world to me, however, frankly, I desperately wanted to meet him and his family. That was never to be.

I gave my father John’s contact information and I gave John my father’s contact information urging them to reach out to each other. I felt certain they would because of their strong religious faith and dedication to family. I was concerned that due to their age, one would pass and they would never have the opportunity to meet. And that is just what happened. It just hurt my heart so much. I had felt my Grandmother Helen holding my hand as I did this work of reunification of the two brothers. A few years have passed and I still hurt to have had this experience. I have learned you can’t fix some things, especially when it comes to broken family relations. I have let go and let God…

 
My father had noted in his family history notes he had a brother that was placed for adoption at birth. My mother had told me that my father had had a brother born before him in Chicago when my grandfather, Wilder Morris Bosworth, was in dental school. She told me my grandfather made my Grandmother Helen give him up for adoption. This is still a bit of a mystery to me because my father was born a year later and they raised him and another brother after this adoption took place.
 
I have a copy of a news article my grandmother kept with her family history research and collection of genealogy notes that my father came into possession of after my Grandmother Helen passed away. My father went through her things and saved what he felt was important. This article was included when my father wrote his version of the family history. His version of the family history was a work of opinion in several cases. 


John Mosiman (1931 – 2012)
uncle
 
Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
father of John Mosiman
(Adoptive parents: Fred and Lucille Mosiman of Elgin, Illinois)
 
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.
 
Me
the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

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This is the photo of John Mosiman from an article my Grandmother Helen had kept in her keepsakes until she passed away.

 


 

 

Mosiman-John The Daily Herald-Chicago IL USA 1974 December 27 Photo
The Daily Herald-Chicago Illinois 1974 January 27  “John Mosiman: his painting comes from the heart”

 

The Daily Herald-Chicago Illinois 1974 January 27

John Mosiman: his painting comes from the heart

By Eleanor Rives

One spectator called it “ballet on a palette.”

John Mosiman, Elgin artist who has made thousands of appearances before clubs, schools, conventions, banquets and churches, entitles it “Musical Paintings.”

More than music, more than art, Mosiman’s program holds an audience enthralled. At his recent appearance at the Des Plaines Ladies of Elks Christmas dinner, one could hear a pin drop.

He dramatically combines stereophonic music, “painting” with colored chalks and theatrical lighting units that he manipulates to produce various moods in an almost dreamlike sequence.

His movements coincide with the rhythms and interpretations of such orchestral sound tracks as “Carmen”

His Scenes are realistic 00 the vastness and grandeur of America’s West; landscapes from Venice, Ecuador, Spain; a Midwestern farm scene; vistas of natural beauty he has encountered in his travels from coast to coast and in seven foreign countries.

Let’s look in on Mosiman’s Christmas program.

“I have my orchestra with me tonight in there two boxes,” Mosiman chats with the audience, with modest reference to his new stereophonic speakers, part of the 200 pounds of equipment – easel, sound system and theatrical lighting units – he brings with him.

The only illumination in the room falls on the large canvas in the gold frame.

Matching his strokes and pace to the music, the lefthanded artist proceeds to depict the manger scene on a background already aswirl with muted color. Mosiman matches mood for mood, slashing in bold, dramatic lines to the beat, excitement building as the music crescendos. The finished scene is viewed in quiet awe through a succession of lighting effects – now dim, now fiery, now fluorescent – to a musical background of “What Child is This?”

And so it is with the Wise Men following a star, then with the shepherds tending their flocks in the fields, ending with the stirring music of Handel’s “Messiah.”

House lights go up, the audience returns to reality to pop questions at Mosiman, who explainds the ‘more mundane aspects of how to use the vinyl-backed canvas over and over, how to make one’s own chalk, how the lights are operated.

“Making chalk is easier than making a cake…all except black, I buy that,” he says.

Back in 1952, John Mosiman, a student at Wheaton College, was drawing I the black ghettos on the south side of Chicago. Then, with art degree tucked under his arm, he took off for Ecuador to work with a missionary radio station.

“I was doing missionary work in a specialized way,” he said. He was sent by the mission to give art programs in Peru, Bolivia, Colombia, Panama, Costa Rico. He presented them to a background of classical music.

Gradually he began moving with the music. When the mission got late television, John was responsible for all the art work, the title cards, the backdrops and a program of his own.

When he saw his own program on TV, he realized he was not identifying with the music nearly as much as he supposed. “From that time on I just let go,” he said. “I really threw myself into it.

Mosiman met his wife, a nurse with the mission, at language school in Costa Rica where he was studying Spanish. They married, lived 10 years in Quito, Ecuador, then moved back to the states with their three children, settling in Algonquin (later in Elgin).

At that time, Johns life was at crossroads, with three possible directions. He was a partner and craftsman in a small printing shop; he had returned to school, Northern Illinois University, to work on his master’s degree; he could continue performing. Which route to go?

“I really liked performing best,” he said.

H attained his master’s degree, ended his print shop affiliation and began performing again. In the next few years his programs mushroomed from none to 250 a year.

Since then he has performed in San Francisco, Las Vegas, Dallas, Miami, New York and host of other places including numerous engagements in the northwest suburbs. He has appeared before approximately 200 organizations this past year, 25 of them schools. For the convenience of club program chairmen, he is listed in Paddock Publications Program Directory. He may be reached at 805-7341.

His programs vary from 15 to 75 minutes. Some are light and gay, some serious and sedate. All involve weeks of preparation designing color sketches, lighting sequences, musical sound tracks, scripts and choreography. But more than this makes John Mosiman’s performance exhilarating.

He summed it simply. “I feel the pictures. They come from inside.”

 


 

In Memory of  John Mosiman

September 12, 1931 – December 26, 2012

Obituary

John Mosiman, devoted husband, father, and grandfather went to be with his Lord on December 26, 2012.

John was the adopted son of Fred and Lucille Mosiman of Elgin, Illinois. He leaves a legacy of faith and love to his wife of 57 years, Gloria.

John is survived by his sister Sue Wyld of Wheaton, Illinois; three adult children, his daughter Elizabeth Adkins of Summerville, South Carolina; his daughter Marianne and her husband John Sullivan of Austin, Texas; his son John Douglas Mosiman and his wife Ajeli of Fort Mill, South Carolina; and five grandchildren.

John graduated from Wheaton College in 1953 and later earned his Master of Art degree in art at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, Illinois.

John and Gloria met in San José, Costa Rica. They studied Spanish prior to mission work in Ecuador South America. They were married in Quito, Ecuador where they served as missionaries for twelve years.

John created an art form he called “Musical Paintings.” It was a blend of chalk paintings with theatrical lighting and choreographed to music, captivating audiences at clubs, conventions, churches and schools. He performed from New York to Dallas, Miami to San Francisco, also to Canada and seven countries in Latin America crossing a span of forty-one years.

John was an accomplished artist and created pencil drawings and acrylic paintings. He enjoyed hiking and camping in the wilderness. During his career he climbed forty-seven peaks in the Rocky Mountains. He was well-known for sleeping under the stars in his hammock instead of a tent. He greatly enjoyed carving intricate designs and Bible verses on walking sticks.

John opted to spend his retirement years ministering in Ciudad Acuña, Mexico. A major part of his work was building houses for destitute families, enabling them to move out of their cardboard shacks and into frame houses. He recruited and spearheaded volunteer construction teams, supervising them and working with his own hands as well. They constructed over one hundred fifty houses. John gather financial donation of over one million dollars.

John sponsored hundreds of Mexican youths for high school and university education. Through his life, God radically changed the life of many people; both those in need and those who came to help.

John completed his work in Mexico in 2010 when his illness prevented him from travelling. Since that time, being confined at home, he enjoyed teaching the Bible to small groups at his home and mentoring several individuals.

John will be missed by his family and friends worldwide. John often mentioned this Bible verse: “There is nothing in us that allows us to claim that we are capable of doing this work. The capacity we have comes from God. It is he who made us capable of serving…” – 2 Corinthians 3.5, 6 TEV.

A memorial service celebrating John’s life will be held at 2:00 P.M. on Saturday, January 5, 2013 at Hillcrest Baptist Church, 3838 Steck Ave, Austin, Texas. 78759.

In lieu of flowers, John has requested donations be made out to His Work, Inc., 13217 Dime Box Trl. Austin, TX 78729, with a memo designating the check for Acuña Mexico Ministry, Building and or Education. Website: http://hisworkinc.org or for aiding persecuted Christians around the world, send donations to the Voice of Martyrs, PO Box 443, Bartlesville, OK 74005-0443, phone 800-747-0085, memo John Mosiman memorial.

Condolences may be made at www.cookwaldenchapelofthehills.com

http://obits.dignitymemorial.com/dignity-memorial/obituary.aspx?n=John-Mosiman&lc=4885&pid=161990150&mid=5357326#

 


 

I still have deep sadness when I think of my Grandmother Helen’s tremendous sacrifice of having to place her son for adoption. I have sadness that there was a family I never knew and whom I would have loved with all my heart. It is just a heartbreaking story that haunts me. While I am grateful and appreciative I was able to find out who my uncle was and how he spent his life, I just wish I could have helped those two brothers to unite. 


Here are some bits of information I gleaned from my research:

 

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John Mosiman at Wheaton College
Florida, Passenger Lists 1898-1963 for John Mosiman
Florida, Passenger Lists 1898-1963 for John Mosiman

 

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Two Pumps by John Mosiman 8×16 inch serigraph
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Grand Canyon by John Mosiman, 6×8 serigraph
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Signed JOHN MOSIMAN ” Door County Barn ” Original Serigraph
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John Mosiman Serigraph Numbered Misty Autumn Morning LE 69/225 Woods Cabin 13×10

 

The Daily Herald-Chicago IL USA 1
John Mosiman “Musical Painter” – The Daily Herald/Chicago Illinois 1971 January 21

 

http://sacredartpilgrim.com/collection/view/86

https://reachbeyond.org/content/news/read/compassion-and-brush-strokes-of-artist-brightened-lives-of-others-1

http://www.graceofgiving.org/Newsletters/Newsletter%20April%202005.pdf

 

So many of John Mosiman’s works of art are available to view just by Googling his name. I especially love the barn and Wisconsin scenes, of course. My style of painting is much like his. 

I just wish I could have met him. I wish my father and grandmother could have known him. At least I feel I kind of know him.

 

 

 

Mary Ann (Kynerd) Smith 1819–1911

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Mary Ann Kynerd 1819–1911

When Mary Ann Kynerd was born on May 13, 1819, in Alabama, her father, Jacob, was 22 and her mother, Rosanah (Taylor), was 20. She married George Rayford Smith on November 6, 1843, in Perry County, Alabama. They had 11 children in 19 years. She died on September 13, 1911, in Neshoba County, Mississippi, at the impressive age of 92, and was buried there.

 


Mary Ann KYNERD (1819 – 1911)
 my 2nd great-grandmother
 
John George SMITH (1861 – 1946)
son of Mary Ann KYNERD
 
Rosa Ann Elizabeth “Rosie” SMITH (1895 – 1984)
daughter of John George SMITH
 
Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013)
daughter of Rosa Ann Elizabeth “Rosie” SMITH
 
Me
the daughter of Janie Lucille MORRIS

Various spellings of Mary Ann’s last name exist.

 

Irene (Jordan) Harkness 1845–1916

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Birth 30 Nov 1845 Mississippi, USA

Death 15 Nov 1916 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA

my great great grandmother

Irene JORDAN Harkness (1845 – 1916)
Edna Irene HARKNESS (1880 – 1952)
daughter of Irene JORDAN
John Harkness MORRIS (1901 – 1965)
son of Edna Irene HARKNESS
Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013)
daughter of John Harkness MORRIS
Me
the daughter of Janie Lucille MORRIS

Irene Jordan
Irene JORDAN Harkness (1845 – 1916) of the Mississippi Gulf Coast
When Irene JORDAN was born on November 30, 1845, in Mississippi, her father, William, was 30 and her mother, Nancy, was 24. She married Capt. John Rankin HARKNESS on November 19, 1868, in Harrison County, Mississippi. They had seven children in 14 years. She died on November 15, 1916, in Biloxi, Mississippi, at the age of 70, and was buried there.
Irene “was the daughter of Wm. M Jordan and Nancy Bond Jordan.”
Bradford O’Keefe Funeral Home records.

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Irene JORDAN Harkness (1845 – 1916), Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi Obituary

Irene is buried with her husband, John Rankin Harkness and daughter (also named Irene) in the old Biloxi Cemetery.

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Biloxi Pioneers – John Rankin Harkness and his wife, Irene Jordan Harkness. Old Biloxi Cemetery, Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi

Pioneers of Biloxi Mississippi

Irene Jordan Harkness’ father, Rev. William Millard S. Jordan, 
  founded Biloxi’s first Methodist Church in abt 1842.
Her mother Nancy Bond Jordan’s family history includes a locally famous pioneer of the Mississippi Gulf Coast listed in the . Irene’s great grandfather was John Bond of Wiggins, Mississippi. He was an American Revolutionary War officer.  He and his father is listed in “The Order of the First Families of Mississippi 1699-1817” ancestor roster.

Capt. John Rankin Harkness 1830-1903

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Capt. John Rankin Harkness 1830–1903 / Biloxi Pioneer / Architect and builder of many homes, the school and businesses in Biloxi. Harkness was street commissioner on the Biloxi City Council and was a member of the school board as evidenced in The Biloxi Herald newspaper at the time.

 

 


Capt. John Rankin Harkness

 

1830–1903

Birth 26 Mar 1830 Pelham, Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA

Death 11 Jun 1903 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA

my great-great grandfather

 


Edna Irene HARKNESS (1880 – 1952)
daughter of Capt. John Rankin HARKNESS
 
John Harkness MORRIS (1901 – 1965)
son of Edna Irene HARKNESS
 
Janie Lucille MORRIS (1935 – 2013)
daughter of John Harkness MORRIS
 
Me
the daughter of Janie Lucille MORRIS

J.R. Harkness is a descendant of two proved Mayflower passengers:
Francis Cooke and John Turner

 

When Capt. John Rankin Harkness was born on March 26, 1830, in Pelham, Massachusetts, his father, William, was 37 and his mother, Abigail, was 36. He married Irene Jordan on November 19, 1868, in Harrison County, Mississippi. They had seven children in 14 years. He died on June 11, 1903, in Biloxi, Mississippi, at the age of 73, and was buried there.

 

Capt. John Rankin Harkness Family Chart
Capt. John Rankin Harkness of Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi. Biloxi Pioneer.

J.R. Harkness resided in Biloxi.

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25 Feb 1888 The Biloxi Daily Herald – J.R. Harkness, Biloxi, MS

 

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23 Jun 1888 The Biloxi Daily Herald / Mississippi / J.R. Harkness

In 1888 the state of Mississippi began providing pensions to former Confederate soldiers and sailors, as well as their widows and wartime servants residing in the state.

1888 JR Harkness designed this building. Howard Memorial School-Biloxi, Harrison County, Mississippi

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J.R. Harkness – Architect – Biloxi, Mississippi 1888
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John Rankin Harkness – 23 Jun 1888 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA – Newspaper Article from the Biloxi Daily Herald-Contractor & Builder

 

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John Rankin Harkness-President of Mechanics Steam Fire Engine Company No. 2 – 19 Sep 1891 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA Newspaper Article from the Biloxi Daily Herald, Also show W.T. Harkness as 2nd Assistant.
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Confederate Veterans-J.R. Harkness is listed as part of committee of arrangements for a barbecue for ex-Confederates, their families and friends. 8 Oct 1892

Biloxi Herald – November 19, 1892 states J.R. Harkness ran for Alderman.

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1893 John R. Harkness & Sons Planing and Milling Co. of Biloxi, Mississippi Daily Herald Newspaper, Biloxi, MS

 

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Capt. J. R. Harkness Contracted to Repair Damages-The Daily Herald, Biloxi, MS 24 Feb 1894
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The Harkness Boys Have Always Been Sailors 7 Aug 1897 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA Daily Herald Newspaper, Biloxi, MS Note: Their boat was named the May H. (May Harkness?)
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William Harkness Family in History of Pelham History of Pelham, Page 421. Mention of John Harkness in Pelham as William Harkness’ son.

J.R. Harkness was a member of the Freemasons

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Downtown Biloxi 1902-Photo from The Daily Herald Twentieth Century Coast Edition-Historical and Biographical 1902 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA The building on the right side of this photo, on the corner, is one built by J.R. Harkness and his son.
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J. R. Harkness – Biloxi Street Commissioner 1902 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA Twentieth century coast edition of the Biloxi Daily Herald … historical and biographical: “one of the oldest and most respected citizens”

 

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List of Biloxi Pioneers – “HARKNESS” is on the list.
John R. Harkness born-Massachusetts Town and Vital Records 1620-1988
John R. Harkness born-Massachusetts Town and Vital Records 1620-1988 / Biloxi Pioneer
John R. Harkness born-Massachusetts Town and Vital Records 1620-1988  2
John R. Harkness born-Massachusetts Town and Vital Records 1620-1988 Zoom
U.S. City Directories 1822-1995 Biloxi Mississippi Listing for J.R. Harkness' Widow Irene
U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 Biloxi, Mississippi listing for John R Harkness’ widow, Irene.

The Carson edifice at Belle Fontaine, was designed and built by John R. Harkness & Sons of Biloxi.  John .Rankin Harkness (1827-1903), a native of Amherst, Massachusetts, had commenced his contracting business at Biloxi in 1868.  The two-story residence cost $5000 and was shingled from the ground to the cone.  Mr. Harkness and his family and friends occasionally sailed to the construction site, often referred to as “New Chicago”, for a days outing.  J.R. Harkness & Sons completed the Carson home in October 1892.(Dyer, 1895, “Biloxi”, The Biloxi Herald, April 9, 1892, p. 4, July 30, 1892, p. 4, and September 28, 1892, p. 4)

http://www.oceanspringsarchives.com/osfamilies.htm taken from several issues of the Biloxi Daily Herald 1892


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John R. Harkness / Irene Jordan Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA Old Biloxi City Cemetery
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John Rankin Harkness Death Notice 12 Jun 1903 Biloxi, Harrison, Mississippi, USA Newspaper Notice from the Daily Herald

 

Memorial on Find-A-Grave for John Rankin Harkness:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=29276167&ref=acom

 

Almira (Smith) Bosworth 1811-1834

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Almira SMITH Bosworth

1811–1834

Birth 6 Jan 1811 Saratoga, Saratoga, New York, USA

Death 09 Dec 1834 Saratoga, New York, USA

my 3rd great grandmother

 


 
Franklin Smith BOSWORTH (1832 – 1919)
son of Almira SMITH
 
Frank Hunt BOSWORTH (1870 – 1919)
son of Franklin Smith BOSWORTH
 
Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S. (1905 – 1990)
son of Frank Hunt BOSWORTH
 
Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II (1933 – )
son of Dr. Wilder Morris BOSWORTH Sr., D.D.S.
 
Me
the daughter of Capt. Frank Hunt BOSWORTH II

Almira SMITH was born on January 6, 1811, in Saratoga, New York, the child of Amos. She married Benjamin Franklin BOSWORTH on January 12, 1832, in Buffalo, New York. They had one child during their marriage. She died as a young mother on December 9, 1834, in her hometown, at the age of 23.

Almira is one of my mystery ancestors. I want to know who her parents are. It is possible her first name was Amelia. She died of consumption so young, and with a child, it just tugs on my heartstrings.

Dr. Benjamin Franklin Bosworth was Almira’s husband.

I believe she was of the Methodist Episcopal faith. I would very much like to learn who Amelia’s parents were.


 

Franklin S. BOSWORTH – a native of Boston, Erie Co., New York, and son of Benjamin F. and Almira SMITH BOSWORTH.  The father was born in Greenfield, New York, and was the son of Alfred BOSWORTH, born in Bristol, Rhode Island, of English parentage.  Alfred came west in the fall of 1839, to Dundee, Ill. where he died in June 1861.  He followed the hatter’s trade, and later farming.  He married Olive CHILD of New York, and they had 6 children: Benjamin F., Oliver C., Increase C., Lucinda C., Mary C. wife of Harry WEED, Lucinda wife of Alfred EDWARDS and Abbie M, wife of Benj. SIMONDS; all are now deceased.
Dr. Benjamine F. BOSWORTH the father practiced medicine til his removal to Illinois; locating in Chicago in 1856, he engaged in merchandising in that place until his removal to McHenry, Ill where he conducted a mercatile establishment until his death in Sept. 1843. (transcribers note: these dates are as given. Perhaps reversed?)
His wife was the daughter of Amos SMITH, of NY. 
Franklin S. BOSWORTH, their only child, was born Dec. 17, 1832. He began merchandising in 1852, in connection with I.C. BOSWORTH, at Dundee, Ill. until June 1871, when he removed to Elgin.  There he pruchased interest in an east side hardware store, until Sept. 1883 when he sold to Metcalf and Reed.  1888 he purchased part of a coal and lumber yard – 1896 he became partners with his son Frank H. BOSWORTH.
Jan 1859 he married Miss Sarah E. HUNT of Dundee, daughter of Ward E. and Mary HUNT, her father a native of Vermont. 4 BOSWORTH children: Reuben H., Edward, married to Bertha McCLURE of Elgin;  Mary, wife of Walter SKEELE; and Frank H.
Mr. BOSWORTH was elected mayor of Elgin in 1880, for 2 terms.

Biographical Record of Kane Co., Ill.
S.J. Clarke Publishing Co.
Chicago, Ill  1898

page 4

Bosworth Entries in the Biographical Record of Kane Co., Ill.

1898

Elgin, Kane, Illinois, USA

Biographical Sketch of Franklin Smith Bosworth, Alfred Bosworth, Dr. Benjamin F. Bosworth and families.

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Original data: Child, Elias,. Genealogy of the Child, Childs, and Childe families : of the past and present in the United States and the Canadas, from 1630 to 1881. Utica, N.Y.: Published for the author by Curtiss & Childs, 1881.

 

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Marriage records. Early Settlers of New York State, Vol. I April 1938, Marriage Records., Borland – Bowen. Taken from Buffalo Newspapers.